Translation: from spanish

which way to go

Look at other dictionaries:

  • not know which way to turn — or[not know which way to jump] {v. phr} To be puzzled about getting out of a difficulty; not know what to do to get out of trouble. * /When Jane missed the last bus home, she didn t know which way to turn./ * /After Mr. Brown died, Mrs. Brown had …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • not know which way to turn — or[not know which way to jump] {v. phr} To be puzzled about getting out of a difficulty; not know what to do to get out of trouble. * /When Jane missed the last bus home, she didn t know which way to turn./ * /After Mr. Brown died, Mrs. Brown had …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • every which way — also[any which way] In all directions. * /Bricks and boards were scattered in confusion on the ground every which way, just as they had fallen after the tornado./ Compare HELTER SKELTER …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • every which way — also[any which way] In all directions. * /Bricks and boards were scattered in confusion on the ground every which way, just as they had fallen after the tornado./ Compare HELTER SKELTER …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • every which way — adverb Etymology: probably by folk etymology from Middle English everich way every way Date: 1824 1. in every direction 2. in a disorderly manner ; irregularly < toys scattered about every which way > …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • any which way — See: EVERY WHICH WAY …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • know which way to turn — See: NOT KNOW WHICH WAY TO TURN …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • any which way — See: EVERY WHICH WAY …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • know which way to turn — See: NOT KNOW WHICH WAY TO TURN …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • way — See: ALL THE WAY or THE WHOLE WAY, BY THE WAY, BY WAY OF, COME A LONG WAY, CUT BOTH WAYS or CUT TWO WAYS, EVERY WHICH WAY, FROM WAY BACK, GO OUT OF ONE S WAY, HARD WAY, HAVE A WAY WITH, IN A BAD WAY, IN A BIG WAY, IN A FAMILY WAY, IN A WAY, IN… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • which — I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, of what kind, which, from Old English hwilc; akin to Old High German wilīh of what kind, which, Old English hwā who, gelīk like more at who, like Date: before 12th century 1. being what one or ones out of a …   New Collegiate Dictionary


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