Translation: from spanish

turn the TV on

Look at other dictionaries:

  • turn the clock back — {v. phr.} To return to an earlier period. * /Mother wished she could turn the clock back to the days before the children grew up and left home./ * /Will repealing the minimum wage for workers under age eighteen turn the clock back to the abuses… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • turn the clock back — {v. phr.} To return to an earlier period. * /Mother wished she could turn the clock back to the days before the children grew up and left home./ * /Will repealing the minimum wage for workers under age eighteen turn the clock back to the abuses… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • turn the tide — {v. phr.} To change what looks like defeat into victory. * /We were losing the game until Jack got there. His coming turned the tide for us, and we won./ Compare: TIP THE SCALES …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • turn the tide — {v. phr.} To change what looks like defeat into victory. * /We were losing the game until Jack got there. His coming turned the tide for us, and we won./ Compare: TIP THE SCALES …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • turn the other cheek — {v. phr.} To let someone do something to you and not to do it in return; not hit back when hit; be patient when injured or insulted by someone; not try to get even. * /Joe turned the other cheek when he was hit with a snowball./ …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • turn the other cheek — {v. phr.} To let someone do something to you and not to do it in return; not hit back when hit; be patient when injured or insulted by someone; not try to get even. * /Joe turned the other cheek when he was hit with a snowball./ …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • turn the trick — {v. phr.}, {informal} To bring about the result you want; succeed in what you plan to do. * /Jerry wanted to win both the swimming and diving contests, but he couldn t quite turn the trick./ Compare: DO THE TRICK …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • turn the trick — {v. phr.}, {informal} To bring about the result you want; succeed in what you plan to do. * /Jerry wanted to win both the swimming and diving contests, but he couldn t quite turn the trick./ Compare: DO THE TRICK …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • turn the scales — {v. phr.} To affect the balance in favor of one party or group against the other. * /It could well be that the speech he made turned the scales in their favor./ …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • turn the scales — {v. phr.} To affect the balance in favor of one party or group against the other. * /It could well be that the speech he made turned the scales in their favor./ …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • turn the tables — {v. phr.} To make something happen just the opposite of how it is supposed to happen. * /The boys turned the tables on John when they took his squirt gun away and squirted him./ …   Dictionary of American idioms


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

Wir verwenden Cookies für die beste Präsentation unserer Website. Wenn Sie diese Website weiterhin nutzen, stimmen Sie dem zu.