Translation: from latin

the sixteenth

  • 1 digitus

        digitus ī, m    [DIC-], a finger: de digito anulum detraho, T.: digitos impellere, ut Scriberent: Indice monstrare digito, H.: illam digito uno attingere, to touch gently, T.: alqd extremis digitis attingere, to touch lightly: attingere caelum digito, to be exceedingly happy: digiti, per quos numerare solemus, O.: in digitis suis singulas partīs causae constituere: si tuos digitos novi, skill in reckoning: si digitis concrepuerit, by a snap of the finger: digitum ad fontīs intendere, to point: qui digito sit licitus, bid at an auction: digitis nutuque loqui, by signs, O.: digito compesce labellum. hold your tongue, Iu.: monstror digito praetereuntium fidicen, H.: demonstravi digito Gallum.— Prov.: ne digitum quidem porrigere, not to move a finger.—A toe: constitit in digitos adrectus, V. — A finger's breadth, inch (the sixteenth part of a pes), Cs.: clavi digiti pollicis crassitudine, Cs.— Prov.: digitum transversum non discedere, swerve a finger's breadth: ab argento digitum discedere: digitis a morte remotus Quattuor, Iu.
    * * *
    finger; toe; a finger's breath

    Latin-English dictionary > digitus

  • 2 sextādecimānī

        sextādecimānī ōrum, m    [sexta decima; sc. legio], the soldiers of the sixteenth legion, Ta.

    Latin-English dictionary > sextādecimānī

  • 3 sextusdecimus

    sextusdecima, sextusdecimum ADJ

    Latin-English dictionary > sextusdecimus

  • 4 Digitus

    1.
    dĭgĭtus, i, m. [Gr. daktulos; cf. Germ. Zehe, Eng. toe; from root dek(dechomai), to grasp, receive; cf.

    Germ. Finger, from fangen,

    Curt. Gr. Etym. 133. Corssen, however, still refers digitus to root dik-, dico, deiknumi, as the pointer, indicator, Ausspr. 1, 380; cf. dico], a finger.
    I.
    Prop.:

    tot (cyathos bibimus), quot digiti sunt tibi in manu,

    Plaut. Stich. 5, 4, 24; id. Most. 5, 1, 69; id. Mil. 2, 2, 47; 4, 2, 57 et saep.—The special designations: pollex, the thumb; index or salutaris, the forefinger; medius, also infamis and impudicus, the middle finger; minimo proximus or medicinalis, the ring-finger; minimus, the little finger, v. under those words.—
    B.
    Special connections:

    attingere aliquem digito (uno),

    to touch one lightly, gently, Plaut. Pers. 5, 2, 15; Ter. Eun. 4, 6, 2 Ruhnk.; Licinius ap. Gell. 19, 9, 13; Cic. Tusc. 5, 19, 55; cf.

    with tangere,

    Plaut. Rud. 3, 5, 30; id. Poen. 5, 5, 29:

    attingere aliquid extremis digitis (with primoribus labris gustare),

    to touch lightly, to enjoy slightly, Cic. Cael. 12:

    attingere caelum digito,

    to be exceedingly happy, id. Att. 2, 1, 7: colere summis digitis, to adore (to touch the offering or consecrated gift) with the tips of the fingers, Lact. 1, 20; 5, 19 fin.; cf. Ov. F. 2, 573:

    computare digitis,

    to count on the fingers, to reckon up, Plaut. Mil. 2, 2, 51; Plin. 34, 8, 19, no. 29, § 88; cf.:

    numerare per digitos,

    Ov. F. 3, 123:

    in digitis suis singulas partis causae constituere,

    Cic. Div. in Caec. 14, 45.—Hence, venire ad digitos, to be reckoned, Plin. 2, 23, 21, § 87; and:

    si tuos digitos novi,

    thy skill in reckoning, Cic. Att. 5, 21, 13; cf.

    also: digerere argumenta in digitos,

    to count on the fingers, Quint. 11, 3, 114: concrepare digitos or digitis, to snap the fingers, as a signal of command, Petr. 27, 5; Plaut. Mil. 2, 2, 53; Cic. Off. 3, 19; v. concrepo; cf.

    also: digitus crepans,

    Mart. 3, 82, 15:

    digitorum crepitus,

    id. 14, 119:

    digitorum percussio,

    Cic. Off. 3, 19, 78:

    intendere digitum ad aliquid,

    to point the finger at any thing, Cic. de Or. 1, 46 fin.:

    liceri digito,

    to hold up the finger in bidding at an auction, Cic. Verr. 2, 3, 11;

    for which also: tollere digitum,

    id. ib. 2, 1, 54. The latter phrase also signifies, to raise the finger in token of submission, said of a combatant, Sid. Ep. 5, 7; cf. Mart. Spect. 29, 5;

    and Schol,

    Pers. 5, 119:

    loqui digitis nutuque,

    to talk by signs, Ov. Tr. 2, 453;

    different is: postquam fuerant digiti cum voce locuti,

    i. e. playing as an accompaniment to singing, Tib. 3, 4, 41; cf.:

    ad digiti sonum,

    id. 1, 2, 31; cf. also Lucr. 4, 587; 5, 1384:

    digito compesce labellum,

    hold your tongue, Juv. 1, 160.—For the various modes of employing the fingers in oratorical delivery, cf. Quint. 1, 10, 35; 11, 3, 92 sq.; 103; 120 al.: monstrari digito, i. e. to be pointed out, to become distinguished, famous, Hor. C. 4, 3, 22; Pers. 1, 28;

    for which: demonstrari digito,

    Tac. Or. 7 fin.; Cic. de Or. 2, 66, 266; id. Rep. 6, 24; Nep. Datam. 11, 5; Suet. Aug. 45.—Prov. phrases:

    nescit, quot digitos habeat in manu, of one who knows nothing at all,

    Plaut. Pers. 2, 2, 5:

    in digitis hodie percoquam quod ceperit,

    i. e. he has caught nothing, id. Rud. 4, 1, 11: ne digitum quidem porrigere, not to stretch out a finger, like the Gr. daktulon mê proteinai, ekteinai, for not to give one's self the least trouble, Cic. Fin. 3, 17, 57; cf.:

    exserere digitum,

    Pers. 5, 119 Scal.;

    and in like manner: proferre digitum,

    to move a finger, to make any exertion, Cic. Caecin. 25, 71:

    scalpere caput digito, of effeminate men fearful of disarranging their hair,

    Juv. 9, 133; cf. Sen. Ep. 52 fin.; a habit of Pompey's, acc. to Calvus ap. Schol. Luc. 7, 726, and Sen. Contr. 3, 19; Amm. 17, 11. (Cf. Echtermeyer's Ueber Namen und symbolische Bedeutung der Finger bei den Griechen und Römern, Progr. d. Hall. Pädagogiums, v. 1835.)
    II.
    Transf.
    A.
    A toe (cf. Heb., Gr. daktulos, Fr. doigt), Lucr. 3, 527; Verg. A. 5, 426; Petr. 132, 14; Sen. Ep. 111; Quint. 2, 3, 8 et saep.; also of the toes of animals, Varr. R. R. 3, 9, 4; Col. 8, 2, 8; Plin. 10, 42, 59, § 119 al.—
    B.
    A small bough, a twig, Plin. 14, 1, 3, § 12; 17, 24, 37, § 224.—
    C.
    As a measure of length, an inch, the sixteenth part of a Roman foot (pes), Front. Aquaed. 24 sq.; Caes. B. G. 7, 73, 6; id. B. C. 2, 10, 4; Juv. 12, 59 al.: digiti primores, finger-ends, as a measure, Cato R. R. 21, 2;

    digitus transversus,

    a fingerbreadth, id. ib. 45 fin.;

    48, 2.—Prov.: digitum transversum non discedere ab aliqua re,

    not to swerve a finger's breadth, Cic. Ac. 2, 18, 58; cf.

    without transversum: nusquam ab argento digitum discedere,

    id. Verr. 2, 4, 15;

    and ellipt.: ab honestissima sententia digitum nusquam,

    id. Att. 7, 3, 11.
    2.
    Dĭgĭtus, i, m., a proper name; in plur.: Digiti Idaei = Daktuloi Idaioi, the priests of Cybele, Cic. N. D. 3, 16, 42; cf. Arn. 3, 41 and 43, and v. Dactylus.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Digitus

  • 5 librarius

    1.
    lībrārĭus, a, um, adj. [libra].
    I.
    Of or containing a pound, of a pound weight (post-Aug.):

    frusta,

    Col. 12, 53, 4:

    as,

    Gell. 20, 1, 31.—
    II.
    Subst.
    A.
    lībrārĭus, ii, m., a weight, the sixteenth part of a modius, = sextarius: sextarius aequus aequo cum librario siet, sexdecimque librarii in modio sient, Plebisc. ap. Paul. ex Fest. p. 246 Müll.—
    B.
    lībrārĭa, ae, f., she that weighed out the wool to the female slaves, a forewoman, head-spinner, called also lanipendia, Juv. 6, 475 (by others referred to 2. librarius); Inscr. Orell. 4212.
    2.
    lĭbrārĭus, a, um, adj. [3. liber], of or belonging to books:

    scriba librarius,

    a copyist, transcriber of books, Varr. R. R. 3, 2, 14; Cic. Agr. 2, 13, 32:

    libraria taberna,

    a bookseller's shop, Cic. Phil. 2, 9, 21:

    scriptor,

    a transcriber of books, Hor. A. P. 354:

    atramentum,

    ink for writing books, Plin. 27, 7, 28, § 52.—Hence,
    II.
    Subst.
    A. 1.
    A transcriber of books, a copyist, scribe, secretary, Cic. Agr. 2, 5, 13:

    librum ut tuis librariis daret,

    id. Att. 12, 40, 1:

    librarii mendum,

    Liv. 38, 55, 8: legionis, the secretary of the legion, Inscr. ap. Grut. 365, 1; cf. Sen. Contr. 1, 7, 18; Juv. 9, 109.—
    2.
    A bookseller, Sen. Ben. 7, 6, 1; Gell. 5, 4, 2; 18, 4, 1; Sulp. Sev. Dial. 1, 23, 4. —
    3.
    (Sc. doctor.) An elementary teacher, Hier. Ep. 107, 4.—
    B.
    lĭbrārĭa, ae, f.
    1.
    A female scribe:

    (Parcae) utpote librariae Superum archivumque custodes,

    Mart. Cap. 1, § 65 (perh. also Juv. 6, 476; cf. sub 1. librarius).—
    2.
    A bookseller's shop; in libraria, ego et Julius Paulus poëta consederamus, Gell. 5, 4, 1:

    quispiam in libraria sedens,

    id. 13, 30, 1.—
    C.
    lĭbrārĭum, ii, n., a place to keep books in, a bookcase, bookchest:

    exhibe librarium illud legum vestrarum,

    Cic. Mil. 12, 33:

    libraria omnia exurerent,

    Amm. 29, 2, 4.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > librarius

  • 6 Q

    Q, q, the sixteenth letter of the Latin alphabet (in which i and j were reckoned as one), concerning the origin of which the ancients were in doubt, some correctly supposing it to be the Greek Koppa (ϙ), transferred from the Dorian alphabet of Cumæ, Quint. 1, 4, 9; Ter. Maur. p. 2253 P.; Mar. Victor. p. 2459 and 2468 ib.; while others erroneously explained it as a mere graphical contraction of C and V, Vel. Long. p. 2218 P.; Ter. Maur. p. 2399 ib.; cf. Diom. p. 420 ib.; Mart. Cap. 3, § 255; Isid. Orig. 1, 4, 14. There is a perpetual vacillation between the spelling cu, q, and qu in the inscrr. and MSS.; hence q frequently stands for c. In early inscriptions, PEQVDES and PEQVNIA occur for pecudes and pecunia (Lex Thor. lin. 14 and 19); QVM for the prep. cum, Inscr. Vet. ap. Orell. 566, and also upon a coin, A. U. C. 737; and QVOM for the prep. cum, in the fourth epitaph of the Scipios, and in the Lex Thor. lin. 21:

    QVOQIRCA for quocirca in the Lex Jul. Municip.: IN OQVOLTOD for in occulto, S. C. Bacch. On the other hand, for quod stands CVOD,

    Inscr. Orell. 3882;

    for aquae, ACVAE,

    Inscr. Grut. 593, 5. But qu before a u sound does not occur during the Republican period, when quom or cum, equos, locuntur, anticus, etc., were the forms in use; v. Rib. prol. Verg. p. 442 sq.; 449; Brambach, p. 20 sq. — On the vacillation of the oldest MSS. between cu and qu, see Freund ad Cic. Mil. p. 31 sq. — Q often corresponds with the Greek p: Lat. quinque, equos, sequor; Gr. pente (pempe) hippos, hepô. — And also with the Gr. t, for which the Oscan has p: Gr. tis, ti; Oscan pis, pit; Lat. quis, quid: Gr. te; Oscan pe; Lat. que: Gr. tettara; Oscan petora; Lat. quattuor; on the origin of the Lat. qu in an lndo-European kv, v. Corss. Ausspr. 1, 67 sqq.; Ascoli, Vergl. Lautl. 1, p. 49 sqq.; cf., on the development of qu from c in the Latin language itself, Corss. Ausspr. 2, 356 sq.—As an abbreviation, Q designates most freq. the prænomen Quintus, but also stands for Quaestor, que, quinquennalis, al. Q. I. S. S. quae infra scripta sunt. Q. R. C. F. quando rex comitiavit fas. Q. S. P. P. S. qui sacris publicis praesto sunt. Q. V. A. qui vixit annos. S. P. Q. R. senatus populusque Romanus, etc.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Q

  • 7 seligo

    sē-lĭgo, lēgi. lectum, 3, v. a. [se-lego].
    I.
    In gen. separate by culling out; to choose out, cul select (rare but class.;

    syn.: eligo, deligo), nec vero utetur imprudenter hac copia (communium locorum), sed omnia expendet et seliget,

    Cic. Or. 15, 47:

    exempla,

    id. ib. 29, 103; id. Fin. 3, 6, 22 Orell. and Otto N. cr.: ex quo (commentario) tu, quae digna sunt, selige, Cael. ap. Cic. Fam. 8, 11, 4; Ov. Am. 3, 11, 49; App. M. 10, p. 245, 10:

    selectae sententiae,

    Cic. N. D. 1, 30, 85:

    (Romulus) selecta pectora Patres dixit,

    Ov. F. 5, 71.—
    II.
    In partic.
    A.
    Judices selecti, the judges in criminal suits selected by the prœtor, Cic. Clu. 43, 121; id. Verr. 2, 2, 13, § 32; Hor. S. 1, 4, 123; Ov. Tr. 2, 132; id. Am. 1, 10, 38:

    non potest ad haec sumi judex ex turbā selectorum,

    Sen. Ben. 3, 7, 7; cf. also Plin. 33, 2, 7, § 31.—
    B.
    Di selecti, acc. to Varro, the following twenty Roman deities (twelve male and eight female): Deos selectos esse Janum, Jovem, Saturnum, Genium, Mercurium, Apollinem, Martem, Vulcanum, Neptunum, Solem, Orcum, Liberum patrem, Tellurem, Cererem, Junonem, Lunam, Dianam, Minervam, Venerem, Vestam, Varr. ap. Aug. Civ. Dei, 7, 2 sq.; cf. Aug. Civ. Dei, 7, 33. The sixteenth book of Varro's Antiquitates rerum divinarum treats of the di selecti; cf. Becker, Antiq. 4, p. 24 sq.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > seligo

  • 8 Sex

    1.
    sextus, a, um, num. ord. adj. [sex], the sixth, Plaut. Ps. 4, 2, 5:

    sextus ab urbe lapis,

    Ov. F. 2, 682:

    sextus decimus ab Hercule,

    Vell. 1, 6, 5:

    hic annus sextus, postquam ei rei operam damus,

    Plaut. Men. 2, 1, 9; id. Most. 4, 2, 41:

    sexto decimo anno,

    Cic. Rep. 2, 33, 57:

    sextus locus est, etc.,

    id. Inv. 1, 53, 102:

    sextus decimus (locus),

    id. ib. 1, 56, 109; Tac. A. 1, 17:

    sexta decima legio,

    id. ib. 1, 37 al.:

    sexta decima (sc. hora),

    Mart. Cap. 6, § 696;

    for which also, in one word: post sextumdecimum annum,

    the sixteenth, Liv. 30, 19:

    abdicat die sextodecimo,

    id. 4, 34:

    sextodecimo Calendas Jan.,

    Col. 11, 2, 94.—In gram.:

    sextus casus,

    the ablative case, Quint. 1, 4, 26.—
    B.
    Advv.
    1.
    sextum, for the sixth time:

    in M. Catonis quartā Origine ita perscriptum est: Carthaginienses sextum de foedere decessere. Id verbum significat, quinquies ante eos fecisse contra foedus, et tum sextum,

    Gell. 10, 1, 10:

    sextum consul,

    Cic. Pis. 9, 20.—
    * 2.
    sextō, six times: lavit ad diem septimo aestate vel sexto, Treb. Gall. 17.
    2.
    Sextus (abbrev. Sex.), i, m., a Roman proper name.
    1.
    Sex. Roscius Amerinus, Cic. Rosc. Am. 6, 15.—
    2.
    Sex. Pompeius, Cic. Att. 12, 37, 4.—In a play upon 1. sextus, Quint. 6, 3, 86; v. annalis fin.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Sex

  • 9 sextadecimani

    sextā-dĕcĭmāni, ōrum, m. [sextus], the soldiers of the sixteenth legion, Tac. H. 3, 22.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > sextadecimani

  • 10 sextarius

    sextārĭus, ii, m. [sextus].
    I.
    In gen., the sixth part of a measure, weight, etc., Rhemn. Fann. Pond. 71; Fest. s. v. publica pondera, p. 246 Müll.—
    II.
    In partic.
    A.
    As a liquid measure, the sixth part of a congius, = a pint, Cato, R. R. 13, 3; Varr. ap. Gell. 3, 14, 2; Cic. Off. 2, 16, 56; Hor. S. 1, 1, 74; Plin. 28, 6, 17, § 64 al.—
    B.
    As a dry measure, the sixteenth part of a modius, Col. 2, 9 fin.; 2, 10, 24; 12, 5, 1; Plin. 18, 13, 35, § 131; 24, 14, 79, § 129; Dig. 47, 2, 21, § 5.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > sextarius

  • 11 sextum

    1.
    sextus, a, um, num. ord. adj. [sex], the sixth, Plaut. Ps. 4, 2, 5:

    sextus ab urbe lapis,

    Ov. F. 2, 682:

    sextus decimus ab Hercule,

    Vell. 1, 6, 5:

    hic annus sextus, postquam ei rei operam damus,

    Plaut. Men. 2, 1, 9; id. Most. 4, 2, 41:

    sexto decimo anno,

    Cic. Rep. 2, 33, 57:

    sextus locus est, etc.,

    id. Inv. 1, 53, 102:

    sextus decimus (locus),

    id. ib. 1, 56, 109; Tac. A. 1, 17:

    sexta decima legio,

    id. ib. 1, 37 al.:

    sexta decima (sc. hora),

    Mart. Cap. 6, § 696;

    for which also, in one word: post sextumdecimum annum,

    the sixteenth, Liv. 30, 19:

    abdicat die sextodecimo,

    id. 4, 34:

    sextodecimo Calendas Jan.,

    Col. 11, 2, 94.—In gram.:

    sextus casus,

    the ablative case, Quint. 1, 4, 26.—
    B.
    Advv.
    1.
    sextum, for the sixth time:

    in M. Catonis quartā Origine ita perscriptum est: Carthaginienses sextum de foedere decessere. Id verbum significat, quinquies ante eos fecisse contra foedus, et tum sextum,

    Gell. 10, 1, 10:

    sextum consul,

    Cic. Pis. 9, 20.—
    * 2.
    sextō, six times: lavit ad diem septimo aestate vel sexto, Treb. Gall. 17.
    2.
    Sextus (abbrev. Sex.), i, m., a Roman proper name.
    1.
    Sex. Roscius Amerinus, Cic. Rosc. Am. 6, 15.—
    2.
    Sex. Pompeius, Cic. Att. 12, 37, 4.—In a play upon 1. sextus, Quint. 6, 3, 86; v. annalis fin.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > sextum

  • 12 Sextus

    1.
    sextus, a, um, num. ord. adj. [sex], the sixth, Plaut. Ps. 4, 2, 5:

    sextus ab urbe lapis,

    Ov. F. 2, 682:

    sextus decimus ab Hercule,

    Vell. 1, 6, 5:

    hic annus sextus, postquam ei rei operam damus,

    Plaut. Men. 2, 1, 9; id. Most. 4, 2, 41:

    sexto decimo anno,

    Cic. Rep. 2, 33, 57:

    sextus locus est, etc.,

    id. Inv. 1, 53, 102:

    sextus decimus (locus),

    id. ib. 1, 56, 109; Tac. A. 1, 17:

    sexta decima legio,

    id. ib. 1, 37 al.:

    sexta decima (sc. hora),

    Mart. Cap. 6, § 696;

    for which also, in one word: post sextumdecimum annum,

    the sixteenth, Liv. 30, 19:

    abdicat die sextodecimo,

    id. 4, 34:

    sextodecimo Calendas Jan.,

    Col. 11, 2, 94.—In gram.:

    sextus casus,

    the ablative case, Quint. 1, 4, 26.—
    B.
    Advv.
    1.
    sextum, for the sixth time:

    in M. Catonis quartā Origine ita perscriptum est: Carthaginienses sextum de foedere decessere. Id verbum significat, quinquies ante eos fecisse contra foedus, et tum sextum,

    Gell. 10, 1, 10:

    sextum consul,

    Cic. Pis. 9, 20.—
    * 2.
    sextō, six times: lavit ad diem septimo aestate vel sexto, Treb. Gall. 17.
    2.
    Sextus (abbrev. Sex.), i, m., a Roman proper name.
    1.
    Sex. Roscius Amerinus, Cic. Rosc. Am. 6, 15.—
    2.
    Sex. Pompeius, Cic. Att. 12, 37, 4.—In a play upon 1. sextus, Quint. 6, 3, 86; v. annalis fin.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Sextus

  • 13 virilia

    vĭrīlis, e, adj. [vir], of or belonging to a man, manly, virile (cf.: mas, masculus).
    I.
    Lit.
    A.
    In respect of sex, male, masculine.
    1.
    In gen.: virile et muliebre secus, Sall. Fragm. ap. Macr. S. 2, 9:

    virile secus, i. e. puer,

    Plaut. Rud. 1, 2, 19:

    vestimentum,

    id. Men. 4, 2, 97:

    genus,

    Lucr. 5, 1356:

    semen,

    id. 4, 1209:

    stirps fratris,

    Liv. 1, 3, 11:

    vox,

    Ov. M. 4, 382:

    vultus,

    id. ib. 3, 189:

    coetus,

    of men, id. ib. 3, 403; cf. balnea, Cato ap. Gell. 10, 3, 3:

    flamma,

    the love of a man, Ov. A. A. 1, 282.—
    2.
    In partic.
    a.
    In mal. part.:

    pars,

    Lucr. 6, 1209; cf. Col. 7, 11, 2.—As subst.: vĭrī-lia, ĭum, n., = membrum virile, Petr. 108; Plin. 20, 16, 61, § 169; 20, 22, 89, § 243.— Comp.:

    qui viriliores videbantur,

    Lampr. Heliog. 8 fin.
    b.
    In gram., of the masculine gender, masculine:

    nomen,

    Varr. L. L. 10, §§ 21 and 30 Müll.; Gell. 1, 7, 15; 11, 1, 4 al.—
    B.
    In respect of strength, vigor, etc., manly, full-grown, arrived at the years of manhood:

    conversis studiis aetas animusque virilis Quaerit opes, etc.,

    Hor. A. P. 166:

    ne forte seniles Mandentur juveni partes pueroque viriles,

    the parts of fullgrown men, id. ib. 177:

    pars magna domus tuae morietur cum ad virilem aetatem venerit,

    Vulg. 1 Reg. 2, 33:

    toga,

    assumed by Roman youth in their sixteenth year, Cic. Lael. 1, 1; id. Sest. 69, 144; Liv. 26, 19, 5; 42, 34, 4 al.—Opp. to female garments:

    sumpsisti virilem togam quam statim muliebrem stolam reddidisti,

    Cic. Phil. 2, 18, 44.—
    C.
    Transf., in jurid. lang., of or belonging to a person, that falls to a person or to each one in the division of inheritances: ut ex bonis ejus, qui, etc., virilis pars patrono debeatur, a proportionate part, an equal share with others, Gai Inst. 3, 42:

    tota bona pro virilibus partibus ad liberos defuncti pertinere,

    id. ib.:

    virilis,

    id. ib. 3, 70; Dig. 30, 1, 54, § 3; so,

    virilis portio,

    ib. 37, 5, 8 pr.; 31, 1, 70, § 2; Paul. Sent. 3, 2, 3.—
    2.
    Transf., in gen.
    (α).
    Virilis pars or portio, share, part, lot of a person:

    est aliqua mea pars virilis, quod ejus civitatis sum, quam ille claram reddidit,

    my part, my duty, Cic. Verr. 2, 4, 37, § 81:

    plus quam pars virilis postulat,

    id. ib. 2, 3, 3, §

    7: cum illius gloriae pars virilis apud omnes milites sit, etc.,

    Liv. 6, 11, 5:

    quem agrum miles pro parte virili manu cepisset, eum senex quoque vindicaret,

    id. 3, 71, 7:

    haec qui pro virili parte defendunt, optimates sunt,

    i. e. to the utmost of their ability, as far as in them lies, Cic. Sest. 66, 138; so,

    pro virili parte,

    id. Phil. 13, 4, 8:

    pro parte virili,

    Liv. 10, 8, 4; Ov. Tr. 5, 11, 23:

    pro virili portione,

    Tac. Agr. 45; id. H. 3, 20.—
    (β).
    In other connections ( poet.):

    actoris partis chorus officiumque virile Defendat,

    Hor. A. P. 193 Orell. ad loc. —
    II.
    Trop., of quality, worthy of a man, manly, manful, firm, vigorous, bold, spirited, etc.:

    veretur quicquam aut facere aut loqui, quod parum virile videatur,

    Cic. Fin. 2, 14, 47:

    laterum inflexio fortis ac virilis,

    id. de Or. 3, 59, 220:

    inclinatio laterum,

    Quint. 1, 11, 18:

    acta illa res est animo virili, consilio puerili,

    Cic. Att. 14, 21, 3; so,

    ingenium,

    Sall. C. 20, 11:

    vis ingenii (with solida),

    Quint. 2, 5, 23:

    audacia,

    Just. 2, 12, 24:

    oratio (with fortis),

    Cic. de Or. 1, 54, 231; so,

    compositio,

    Quint. 2, 5, 9:

    sermo,

    id. 9, 4, 3:

    ratio atque sententia,

    Cic. Tusc. 3, 10, 22:

    neque enim oratorius iste, immo hercle ne virilis quidem cultus est,

    Tac. Or. 26.—As subst.: vĭrīlia, ĭum, n., manly deeds, Sall. H. 3, 61, 15 Dietsch.— Sup.: ALMIAE SABINAE MATRI VIRILISSIMAE, etc., Inscr. Grud. p. 148, n. 5.— Adv.: vĭrīlĭter, manfully, firmly, courageously (acc. to II.), Cic. Tusc. 2, 27, 65; id. Off. 1, 27, 94; Auct. Her. 4, 11, 16; Ov. F. 1, 479.— Comp.,, Sen. Contr. 5, 33 fin.; id. Brev. Vit. 6, 5.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > virilia

  • 14 virilis

    vĭrīlis, e, adj. [vir], of or belonging to a man, manly, virile (cf.: mas, masculus).
    I.
    Lit.
    A.
    In respect of sex, male, masculine.
    1.
    In gen.: virile et muliebre secus, Sall. Fragm. ap. Macr. S. 2, 9:

    virile secus, i. e. puer,

    Plaut. Rud. 1, 2, 19:

    vestimentum,

    id. Men. 4, 2, 97:

    genus,

    Lucr. 5, 1356:

    semen,

    id. 4, 1209:

    stirps fratris,

    Liv. 1, 3, 11:

    vox,

    Ov. M. 4, 382:

    vultus,

    id. ib. 3, 189:

    coetus,

    of men, id. ib. 3, 403; cf. balnea, Cato ap. Gell. 10, 3, 3:

    flamma,

    the love of a man, Ov. A. A. 1, 282.—
    2.
    In partic.
    a.
    In mal. part.:

    pars,

    Lucr. 6, 1209; cf. Col. 7, 11, 2.—As subst.: vĭrī-lia, ĭum, n., = membrum virile, Petr. 108; Plin. 20, 16, 61, § 169; 20, 22, 89, § 243.— Comp.:

    qui viriliores videbantur,

    Lampr. Heliog. 8 fin.
    b.
    In gram., of the masculine gender, masculine:

    nomen,

    Varr. L. L. 10, §§ 21 and 30 Müll.; Gell. 1, 7, 15; 11, 1, 4 al.—
    B.
    In respect of strength, vigor, etc., manly, full-grown, arrived at the years of manhood:

    conversis studiis aetas animusque virilis Quaerit opes, etc.,

    Hor. A. P. 166:

    ne forte seniles Mandentur juveni partes pueroque viriles,

    the parts of fullgrown men, id. ib. 177:

    pars magna domus tuae morietur cum ad virilem aetatem venerit,

    Vulg. 1 Reg. 2, 33:

    toga,

    assumed by Roman youth in their sixteenth year, Cic. Lael. 1, 1; id. Sest. 69, 144; Liv. 26, 19, 5; 42, 34, 4 al.—Opp. to female garments:

    sumpsisti virilem togam quam statim muliebrem stolam reddidisti,

    Cic. Phil. 2, 18, 44.—
    C.
    Transf., in jurid. lang., of or belonging to a person, that falls to a person or to each one in the division of inheritances: ut ex bonis ejus, qui, etc., virilis pars patrono debeatur, a proportionate part, an equal share with others, Gai Inst. 3, 42:

    tota bona pro virilibus partibus ad liberos defuncti pertinere,

    id. ib.:

    virilis,

    id. ib. 3, 70; Dig. 30, 1, 54, § 3; so,

    virilis portio,

    ib. 37, 5, 8 pr.; 31, 1, 70, § 2; Paul. Sent. 3, 2, 3.—
    2.
    Transf., in gen.
    (α).
    Virilis pars or portio, share, part, lot of a person:

    est aliqua mea pars virilis, quod ejus civitatis sum, quam ille claram reddidit,

    my part, my duty, Cic. Verr. 2, 4, 37, § 81:

    plus quam pars virilis postulat,

    id. ib. 2, 3, 3, §

    7: cum illius gloriae pars virilis apud omnes milites sit, etc.,

    Liv. 6, 11, 5:

    quem agrum miles pro parte virili manu cepisset, eum senex quoque vindicaret,

    id. 3, 71, 7:

    haec qui pro virili parte defendunt, optimates sunt,

    i. e. to the utmost of their ability, as far as in them lies, Cic. Sest. 66, 138; so,

    pro virili parte,

    id. Phil. 13, 4, 8:

    pro parte virili,

    Liv. 10, 8, 4; Ov. Tr. 5, 11, 23:

    pro virili portione,

    Tac. Agr. 45; id. H. 3, 20.—
    (β).
    In other connections ( poet.):

    actoris partis chorus officiumque virile Defendat,

    Hor. A. P. 193 Orell. ad loc. —
    II.
    Trop., of quality, worthy of a man, manly, manful, firm, vigorous, bold, spirited, etc.:

    veretur quicquam aut facere aut loqui, quod parum virile videatur,

    Cic. Fin. 2, 14, 47:

    laterum inflexio fortis ac virilis,

    id. de Or. 3, 59, 220:

    inclinatio laterum,

    Quint. 1, 11, 18:

    acta illa res est animo virili, consilio puerili,

    Cic. Att. 14, 21, 3; so,

    ingenium,

    Sall. C. 20, 11:

    vis ingenii (with solida),

    Quint. 2, 5, 23:

    audacia,

    Just. 2, 12, 24:

    oratio (with fortis),

    Cic. de Or. 1, 54, 231; so,

    compositio,

    Quint. 2, 5, 9:

    sermo,

    id. 9, 4, 3:

    ratio atque sententia,

    Cic. Tusc. 3, 10, 22:

    neque enim oratorius iste, immo hercle ne virilis quidem cultus est,

    Tac. Or. 26.—As subst.: vĭrīlia, ĭum, n., manly deeds, Sall. H. 3, 61, 15 Dietsch.— Sup.: ALMIAE SABINAE MATRI VIRILISSIMAE, etc., Inscr. Grud. p. 148, n. 5.— Adv.: vĭrīlĭter, manfully, firmly, courageously (acc. to II.), Cic. Tusc. 2, 27, 65; id. Off. 1, 27, 94; Auct. Her. 4, 11, 16; Ov. F. 1, 479.— Comp.,, Sen. Contr. 5, 33 fin.; id. Brev. Vit. 6, 5.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > virilis

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