Translation: from spanish

the ones I saw

  • 1 honestidad

    ones'tiđađ
    f
    Ehrlichkeit f, Ehrbarkeit f, Redlichkeit f
    sustantivo femenino
    honestidad
    honestidad [onesti'ðadh]
    num1num (honradez) Ehrlichkeit femenino
    num2num (formalidad) Pflichtbewusstsein neutro
    num3num (decencia) Anständigkeit femenino
    num4num (decoro) Ehrbarkeit femenino; (en sentido moral) Sittsamkeit femenino

    Diccionario Español-Alemán > honestidad

  • 2 portaaviones

    pɔrtaa'bǐones
    m
    ind→ link=portaviones portaviones{
    portaaviones
    portaaviones [porta(a)βi'ones]
    invariable, Flugzeugträger masculino

    Diccionario Español-Alemán > portaaviones

  • 3 747

    = 747.
    Ex. And perhaps the planes are our libraries: they might be prop jets, they might be air busses, the very biggest ones might be 747s.
    * * *
    = 747.

    Ex: And perhaps the planes are our libraries: they might be prop jets, they might be air busses, the very biggest ones might be 747s.

    Spanish-English dictionary > 747

  • 4 Kurdistán

    * * *
    masculino Kurdistan
    * * *
    Ex. While almost all university libraries south of Iraqi Kurdistan were looted and/or burned, even the ones left untouched have little in them.
    * * *
    masculino Kurdistan
    * * *

    Ex: While almost all university libraries south of Iraqi Kurdistan were looted and/or burned, even the ones left untouched have little in them.

    * * *
    Kurdistan
    * * *

    Kurdistán sustantivo masculino
    Kurdistan
    Kurdistán sustantivo masculino Kurdistan
    * * *
    Kurdistan

    Spanish-English dictionary > Kurdistán

  • 5 aburrirse como ostras

    (v.) = be bored stiff, be bored to death, be bored to tears, be bored out of + Posesivo + mind
    Ex. Instead of spending hours being bored stiff in church, most families spend Christmas with family and loved-ones or are still recovering from the hangover.
    Ex. Three years on, and we are bored to death with the war on terror.
    Ex. The tiger was bored to tears with his viewers and started yawning to show it.
    Ex. Bored out of her mind with the long hours and mundane tasks, she decided to give radio a try.
    * * *
    (v.) = be bored stiff, be bored to death, be bored to tears, be bored out of + Posesivo + mind

    Ex: Instead of spending hours being bored stiff in church, most families spend Christmas with family and loved-ones or are still recovering from the hangover.

    Ex: Three years on, and we are bored to death with the war on terror.
    Ex: The tiger was bored to tears with his viewers and started yawning to show it.
    Ex: Bored out of her mind with the long hours and mundane tasks, she decided to give radio a try.

    Spanish-English dictionary > aburrirse como ostras

  • 6 acechar

    v.
    to watch, to spy on.
    el cazador acechaba a su presa the hunter was stalking his prey
    * * *
    1 (vigilar) to watch, spy on; (esperar) to lie in wait for
    2 (caza) to stalk
    3 (amenazar) to threaten, lurk
    * * *
    VT (=observar) to spy on, watch; (=esperar) to lie in wait for; [+ caza] to stalk; (=amenazar) to threaten, beset
    * * *
    verbo transitivo <enemigo/presa> to lie in wait for
    * * *
    = lurk, stalk, lie in + wait, skulk, lurk in + the wings.
    Ex. This is when children are not really concerned with scientific truth; they believe in Father Christmas anyway, even if there lurks the suspicion that there is something rather fishy about it all.
    Ex. So Hutchins arranges her drawings in such a way that as your eye travels leftwards across the page you see the fox who is stalking the hen and trying to catch her.
    Ex. The hurdles that lie in wait for us include ones called 'connectivity', 'electronic journals', 'new software', 'new computers', 'more RAM', 'local area networks' and 'more time and energy'.
    Ex. The novel has many trappings that will ensnare the average reader but skulking at the bottom of its well of intrigue is a timeless terror more attuned to the mature sensibilities of an adult audience.
    Ex. Prince Hal has proved his courage, but the conniving Falstaff and his companions lurk in the wings, waiting for Hal to ascend the throne.
    * * *
    verbo transitivo <enemigo/presa> to lie in wait for
    * * *
    = lurk, stalk, lie in + wait, skulk, lurk in + the wings.

    Ex: This is when children are not really concerned with scientific truth; they believe in Father Christmas anyway, even if there lurks the suspicion that there is something rather fishy about it all.

    Ex: So Hutchins arranges her drawings in such a way that as your eye travels leftwards across the page you see the fox who is stalking the hen and trying to catch her.
    Ex: The hurdles that lie in wait for us include ones called 'connectivity', 'electronic journals', 'new software', 'new computers', 'more RAM', 'local area networks' and 'more time and energy'.
    Ex: The novel has many trappings that will ensnare the average reader but skulking at the bottom of its well of intrigue is a timeless terror more attuned to the mature sensibilities of an adult audience.
    Ex: Prince Hal has proved his courage, but the conniving Falstaff and his companions lurk in the wings, waiting for Hal to ascend the throne.

    * * *
    acechar [A1 ]
    vt
    ‹enemigo/presa› to stalk, to lie in wait for
    somos conscientes del peligro que nos acecha we are aware of the danger that awaits us o that lies ahead of us
    * * *

    acechar ( conjugate acechar) verbo transitivoenemigo/presa to lie in wait for;

    acechar verbo transitivo
    1 to lie in wait for
    2 (amenazar) to threaten

    ' acechar' also found in these entries:
    English:
    stalk
    * * *
    to watch, to spy on;
    el cazador acechaba a su presa the hunter was stalking his prey
    * * *
    v/t lie in wait for
    * * *
    1) : to watch, to spy on
    2) : to stalk, to lie in wait for
    * * *
    acechar vb to lurk

    Spanish-English dictionary > acechar

  • 7 achacar

    v.
    to attribute.
    * * *
    Conjugation model [ SACAR], like link=sacar sacar
    1 to impute, attribute
    * * *
    VT
    1)

    achacar algo a — to attribute sth to, put sth down to

    2) LAm * (=robar) to pinch *, nick **; (=saquear) to pillage, loot
    * * *
    verbo transitivo

    achacarle la culpa a alguiento lay o put the blame on somebody

    * * *
    Ex. Subrules of 21.4 deal, for instance, with works erroneously or fictitiously attributed to a person or corporate body, and official communications.
    ----
    * achacar Algo = set + it down that.
    * achacar Algo a = put + Nombre + down to.
    * * *
    verbo transitivo

    achacarle la culpa a alguiento lay o put the blame on somebody

    * * *

    Ex: Subrules of 21.4 deal, for instance, with works erroneously or fictitiously attributed to a person or corporate body, and official communications.

    * achacar Algo = set + it down that.
    * achacar Algo a = put + Nombre + down to.

    * * *
    achacar [A2 ]
    vt
    le achacaron la responsabilidad del accidente he was held responsible for the accident
    debemos achacarles el problema a los especuladores the speculators are the ones we must blame o the ones who must take the blame, we must lay the blame at the speculators' door
    * * *

    achacar ( conjugate achacar) verbo transitivo:
    achacarle la culpa a algn to lay o put the blame on sb

    achacar vtr (atribuir) to attribute: no se le puede achacar la culpa del accidente, you can't blame him for the accident

    * * *
    to attribute (a to);
    achacó la intoxicación al marisco she blamed the food poisoning on the seafood;
    siempre achaca las culpas a los demás she always blames everyone else
    * * *
    v/t attribute (a to);
    achacar la culpa a alguien blame s.o., put the blame on s.o.
    * * *
    achacar {72} vt
    : to attribute, to impute
    te achaca todos sus problemas: he blames all his problems on you

    Spanish-English dictionary > achacar

  • 8 acobardarse

    pron.v.
    to be frightened, to get frightened; to flinch, to shrink back.
    * * *
    1 to become frightened, lose one's nerve, shrink back ( ante, from)
    * * *
    VPR (=asustarse) to be intimidated, get frightened; (=echarse atrás) to flinch, shrink back ( ante from, at)
    * * *
    (v.) = wuss out, wimp out (on), wimp, chicken out (on/of), get + cold feet
    Ex. What's great about this time of year is that people wuss out and stop training during the Winter (less crowded at the pool, gym, etc.).
    Ex. The main reason he wimped out was that he had a cheap bike that didn't gear properly, and made it extremely hard to bike efficiently.
    Ex. He regards David Jull's unwillingness to take up such a proposal as an early indication that John Howard and his colleagues are wimping.
    Ex. So basically they are chickening out of the debate.
    Ex. The important thing is to be true to yourself, but should you get cold feet at the eleventh hour remember that there could be serious financial implications as well as emotional ones.
    * * *
    (v.) = wuss out, wimp out (on), wimp, chicken out (on/of), get + cold feet

    Ex: What's great about this time of year is that people wuss out and stop training during the Winter (less crowded at the pool, gym, etc.).

    Ex: The main reason he wimped out was that he had a cheap bike that didn't gear properly, and made it extremely hard to bike efficiently.
    Ex: He regards David Jull's unwillingness to take up such a proposal as an early indication that John Howard and his colleagues are wimping.
    Ex: So basically they are chickening out of the debate.
    Ex: The important thing is to be true to yourself, but should you get cold feet at the eleventh hour remember that there could be serious financial implications as well as emotional ones.

    * * *

    ■acobardarse verbo reflexivo
    1 (sentir temor) to become frightened
    2 (retraerse) to lose one's nerve o to shrink back [ante, from]
    ' acobardarse' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    rajarse
    - acobardar
    - encoger
    - rajar
    English:
    chicken out
    - quail
    - chicken
    * * *
    vpr
    to get frightened o scared;
    acobardarse ante un reto to shrink back from a challenge;
    no se acobarda ante nada nothing scares him
    * * *
    v/r get frightened, lose one’s nerve
    * * *
    vr
    : to be frightened, to cower
    * * *
    acobardarse vb to be frightened

    Spanish-English dictionary > acobardarse

  • 9 acostumbrarse a

    v.
    1 to get used to, to become accustomed to, to become used to, to get accustomed to.
    2 to get used to, to accustom oneself to, to become used to, to become accustomed to.
    * * *
    (v.) = get + a feel for, live with, get used to
    Ex. It is in this way that students gain experience by proxy and get a feel for handling problems in the flesh-and-blood world.
    Ex. On any one occasion there will always be children who do not want to borrow or buy, but they are still learning to live with books and how to search out the ones that interest them.
    Ex. Until your skin gets use to it, it will itch but non-scented talcum powder will help, just make sure you don't inhale any of that shit.
    * * *
    (v.) = get + a feel for, live with, get used to

    Ex: It is in this way that students gain experience by proxy and get a feel for handling problems in the flesh-and-blood world.

    Ex: On any one occasion there will always be children who do not want to borrow or buy, but they are still learning to live with books and how to search out the ones that interest them.
    Ex: Until your skin gets use to it, it will itch but non-scented talcum powder will help, just make sure you don't inhale any of that shit.

    Spanish-English dictionary > acostumbrarse a

  • 10 actriz de reparto

    * * *
    (n.) = character actress, supporting actress
    Ex. She describes herself as a character actress, but her television and film roles have been very memorable ones.
    Ex. If there's one category at this year's Oscar ceremony that's pretty much a sure bet, it's the best supporting actor and actress awards.
    * * *
    * * *
    (n.) = character actress, supporting actress

    Ex: She describes herself as a character actress, but her television and film roles have been very memorable ones.

    Ex: If there's one category at this year's Oscar ceremony that's pretty much a sure bet, it's the best supporting actor and actress awards.

    Spanish-English dictionary > actriz de reparto

  • 11 además de

    prep.
    in addition to, besides, plus, aside from.
    Le di mantequilla además de pan I gave him butter in addition to bread.
    * * *
    as well as, in addition to
    además de gordo es feo as well as being fat, he's ugly
    * * *
    besides, as well as
    * * *
    = along with, apart from, as well as, besides, coupled with, in addition (to), over and above, plus, quite apart from, aside from, on top of, other than, complete with, not least, beyond, together with, not to mention
    Ex. A crisp, even impression became the norm, along with the use of respectable paper and ink.
    Ex. Apart from the names of subjects, the names of corporate bodies, persons, chemicals, trade products, and trade names are some other possibilities.
    Ex. All means of conveying affinitive relationships list a number of terms which may be used as well as, or instead of, the original entry term.
    Ex. In a catalogue using main and added entries, all other entries besides the one main entry are added entries.
    Ex. And coupled with it, the simple answer, yes, I think made for a rather historic exchange, and it surely was worth the price of admission.
    Ex. In addition to the full edition, there exist abridged and medium editions of the scheme.
    Ex. Such posts were regarded as a welcome bonus over and above the traditional base market.
    Ex. All of these (except PREVIOUS and NEXT), plus some additional commands are also available from the Command Menu.
    Ex. Quite apart from a completely new vocabulary, the whole mystique of computers is still a source of bewilderment.
    Ex. The author maintains that, aside from increasing computational speed, and thus real-time control, musically no advances have been made.
    Ex. Librarians will have to acquire additional skills on top of the old ones.
    Ex. The advantages, other than the savings in costs, are that they allow the student to progress at an individual pace = Las ventajas, además del ahorro en los costes, son que permiten al estudiante avanzar a su propio ritmo.
    Ex. Such moulds were called double-faced to distinguish them from the ordinary single-faced moulds which continued to be used for making laid paper, complete with bar shadows, for the rest of the eighteenth century.
    Ex. Extra money for books is raised in a variety of ways, not least through the efforts of active parent/teachers' associations.
    Ex. Once it is available, duplicates in large quantities could probably be turned out for a cent apiece beyond the cost of materials.
    Ex. Most such bulletins list titles or abstracts, together with citations of relevant new documents in the subject area.
    Ex. UNIMARC could make a significant contribution to UBC but, if it is to succeed, it requires the co-operation and effort, not to mention the financial outlay, of all national MARC users.
    * * *
    = along with, apart from, as well as, besides, coupled with, in addition (to), over and above, plus, quite apart from, aside from, on top of, other than, complete with, not least, beyond, together with, not to mention

    Ex: A crisp, even impression became the norm, along with the use of respectable paper and ink.

    Ex: Apart from the names of subjects, the names of corporate bodies, persons, chemicals, trade products, and trade names are some other possibilities.
    Ex: All means of conveying affinitive relationships list a number of terms which may be used as well as, or instead of, the original entry term.
    Ex: In a catalogue using main and added entries, all other entries besides the one main entry are added entries.
    Ex: And coupled with it, the simple answer, yes, I think made for a rather historic exchange, and it surely was worth the price of admission.
    Ex: In addition to the full edition, there exist abridged and medium editions of the scheme.
    Ex: Such posts were regarded as a welcome bonus over and above the traditional base market.
    Ex: All of these (except PREVIOUS and NEXT), plus some additional commands are also available from the Command Menu.
    Ex: Quite apart from a completely new vocabulary, the whole mystique of computers is still a source of bewilderment.
    Ex: The author maintains that, aside from increasing computational speed, and thus real-time control, musically no advances have been made.
    Ex: Librarians will have to acquire additional skills on top of the old ones.
    Ex: The advantages, other than the savings in costs, are that they allow the student to progress at an individual pace = Las ventajas, además del ahorro en los costes, son que permiten al estudiante avanzar a su propio ritmo.
    Ex: Such moulds were called double-faced to distinguish them from the ordinary single-faced moulds which continued to be used for making laid paper, complete with bar shadows, for the rest of the eighteenth century.
    Ex: Extra money for books is raised in a variety of ways, not least through the efforts of active parent/teachers' associations.
    Ex: Once it is available, duplicates in large quantities could probably be turned out for a cent apiece beyond the cost of materials.
    Ex: Most such bulletins list titles or abstracts, together with citations of relevant new documents in the subject area.
    Ex: UNIMARC could make a significant contribution to UBC but, if it is to succeed, it requires the co-operation and effort, not to mention the financial outlay, of all national MARC users.

    Spanish-English dictionary > además de

  • 12 adherirse a

    v.
    1 to stick to, to adhere to, to hold to, to hold by.
    María se adhiere a sus ideales Mary sticks to her ideals.
    2 to side with, to rally to, to rally around.
    Silvia se adhiere al partido de derecha Silvia sides with the right wing.
    3 to stick to, to cleave to.
    La etiqueta se adhiere a la tela The label sticks to the fabric.
    * * *
    * * *
    (v.) = adhere to, cling to, espouse, fall in with, stick to, align, cleave to, hew to
    Ex. Since BC adheres closely to the educational and scientific consensus, BC found most favour with libraries in educational establishments.
    Ex. It would be a mistake to cling to the seeming comforts of the old ways at the cost of being unable to get the full advantages of the new ones.
    Ex. Most respondents espoused the latter view as an appropriate response to IT developments to date.
    Ex. Stanton fell in with the suggestion readily.
    Ex. It might be striking to outline the instrumentalities of the future more spectacularly, rather than to stick closely to methods and elements now known.
    Ex. Fiction is an area of stock development and promotion which would readily achieve the goals of development with which public librarians have aligned themselves.
    Ex. The government seems to spurn the architecture profession and there is a growing rift between architects who assert their utility and those who cleave to artistic prerogatives.
    Ex. The structure adopted hews to the theoretical model of the resilient organization as described by Enright.
    * * *
    (v.) = adhere to, cling to, espouse, fall in with, stick to, align, cleave to, hew to

    Ex: Since BC adheres closely to the educational and scientific consensus, BC found most favour with libraries in educational establishments.

    Ex: It would be a mistake to cling to the seeming comforts of the old ways at the cost of being unable to get the full advantages of the new ones.
    Ex: Most respondents espoused the latter view as an appropriate response to IT developments to date.
    Ex: Stanton fell in with the suggestion readily.
    Ex: It might be striking to outline the instrumentalities of the future more spectacularly, rather than to stick closely to methods and elements now known.
    Ex: Fiction is an area of stock development and promotion which would readily achieve the goals of development with which public librarians have aligned themselves.
    Ex: The government seems to spurn the architecture profession and there is a growing rift between architects who assert their utility and those who cleave to artistic prerogatives.
    Ex: The structure adopted hews to the theoretical model of the resilient organization as described by Enright.

    Spanish-English dictionary > adherirse a

  • 13 aerobús

    m.
    airbus, passenger plane.
    * * *
    1 airbus
    * * *
    SM
    1) (Aer) airbus
    2) Caribe long-distance bus, coach, bus (EEUU)
    * * *
    masculino airbus
    * * *
    = airbus [air bus].
    Ex. And perhaps the planes are our libraries: they might be prop jets, they might be air busses, the very biggest ones might be 747s.
    * * *
    masculino airbus
    * * *
    = airbus [air bus].

    Ex: And perhaps the planes are our libraries: they might be prop jets, they might be air busses, the very biggest ones might be 747s.

    * * *
    airbus
    * * *
    airbus
    * * *
    m airbus

    Spanish-English dictionary > aerobús

  • 14 afectuosamente

    adv.
    (yours) affectionately.
    * * *
    1 affectionately (en cartas) best wishes, best regards.
    * * *
    ADV affectionately; [en carta] yours affectionately
    * * *
    = warmly, fondly, affectionately.
    Ex. The visit of the librarian is always warmly anticipated and she often has to act as friend, listening post, nurse or counsellor.
    Ex. The books remembered most vividly and most fondly are the ones that go beyond the bounds of ordinary existence.
    Ex. I've got to tell you, and I do say this affectionately, but we're talking about a geek of the highest order.
    * * *
    = warmly, fondly, affectionately.

    Ex: The visit of the librarian is always warmly anticipated and she often has to act as friend, listening post, nurse or counsellor.

    Ex: The books remembered most vividly and most fondly are the ones that go beyond the bounds of ordinary existence.
    Ex: I've got to tell you, and I do say this affectionately, but we're talking about a geek of the highest order.

    * * *
    affectionately
    * * *
    1. [cariñosamente] affectionately
    2. [en carta] (yours) affectionately

    Spanish-English dictionary > afectuosamente

  • 15 aferrarse a

    v.
    1 to cling to, to fasten upon, to fasten on, to fasten on to.
    María se aferró al marco de la ventMaría Mary clung to the window sill.
    2 to stick to.
    El chiquito se aferró a su madre The little boy stuck to his mother.
    * * *
    1 to clutch to, cling to
    * * *
    (v.) = cling to, fixate on, latch on to, stick fast to, hold to, cleave to, hold fast to
    Ex. It would be a mistake to cling to the seeming comforts of the old ways at the cost of being unable to get the full advantages of the new ones.
    Ex. Many publishers seem fixated on the term 'acquisitions librarian' for promotional mailings.
    Ex. Educational establishments have latched on to the word 'information' and have employed it to encompass very different programmes of study.
    Ex. Until the appearance of the online catalogue, entire libraries had actually been 'frozen' for generations, stuck fast to their major commodity - books.
    Ex. This paper views librarians as tenaciously holding to a paper paradigm in an increasingly electronic environment.
    Ex. The government seems to spurn the architecture profession and there is a growing rift between architects who assert their utility and those who cleave to artistic prerogatives.
    Ex. In holding fast to a belief in health promotion, they resisted being coopted by a now discredited market system.
    * * *
    (v.) = cling to, fixate on, latch on to, stick fast to, hold to, cleave to, hold fast to

    Ex: It would be a mistake to cling to the seeming comforts of the old ways at the cost of being unable to get the full advantages of the new ones.

    Ex: Many publishers seem fixated on the term 'acquisitions librarian' for promotional mailings.
    Ex: Educational establishments have latched on to the word 'information' and have employed it to encompass very different programmes of study.
    Ex: Until the appearance of the online catalogue, entire libraries had actually been 'frozen' for generations, stuck fast to their major commodity - books.
    Ex: This paper views librarians as tenaciously holding to a paper paradigm in an increasingly electronic environment.
    Ex: The government seems to spurn the architecture profession and there is a growing rift between architects who assert their utility and those who cleave to artistic prerogatives.
    Ex: In holding fast to a belief in health promotion, they resisted being coopted by a now discredited market system.

    Spanish-English dictionary > aferrarse a

  • 16 agarrarse a

    v.
    to hold on to, to catch hold of, to clutch at, to hold to.
    Me agarro a la soga I hold to the rope.
    * * *
    (v.) = latch on to, hold to, hold on to, hold fast to, cling to
    Ex. Educational establishments have latched on to the word 'information' and have employed it to encompass very different programmes of study.
    Ex. This paper views librarians as tenaciously holding to a paper paradigm in an increasingly electronic environment.
    Ex. The girls were swept away by the water as they failed to hold on to the bus stand.
    Ex. In holding fast to a belief in health promotion, they resisted being coopted by a now discredited market system.
    Ex. It would be a mistake to cling to the seeming comforts of the old ways at the cost of being unable to get the full advantages of the new ones.
    * * *
    (v.) = latch on to, hold to, hold on to, hold fast to, cling to

    Ex: Educational establishments have latched on to the word 'information' and have employed it to encompass very different programmes of study.

    Ex: This paper views librarians as tenaciously holding to a paper paradigm in an increasingly electronic environment.
    Ex: The girls were swept away by the water as they failed to hold on to the bus stand.
    Ex: In holding fast to a belief in health promotion, they resisted being coopted by a now discredited market system.
    Ex: It would be a mistake to cling to the seeming comforts of the old ways at the cost of being unable to get the full advantages of the new ones.

    Spanish-English dictionary > agarrarse a

  • 17 agudo

    adj.
    1 sharp, smart, keen, astute.
    2 intense, severe, fierce, excruciating.
    3 high-pitched, sharp, shrill, piping.
    4 acute, clever, keen, insightful.
    5 witty, clever.
    6 pointed, acute, sharp-edged.
    7 acute.
    8 oxytone, accented in the last syllable, oxytonic, with a stronger phonetic accent on last syllable.
    Acordeón es una palabra aguda "Acordeon" is accented in the last syllable...
    m.
    high-pitch note, treble.
    * * *
    1 (afilado) sharp
    2 (dolor) acute
    4 figurado (sentido) sharp, keen
    5 (voz) high-pitched
    6 (sonido) treble, high
    7 LINGÚÍSTICA (palabra) oxytone; (acento) acute
    * * *
    (f. - aguda)
    adj.
    1) sharp, acute
    2) high, high-pitched
    3) clever, witty
    * * *
    ADJ
    1) (=afilado) [filo] sharp; [instrumento] sharp, pointed
    2) (=intenso) [enfermedad, dolor] acute; [acento] acute
    3) [ángulo] acute
    4) (=incisivo) [mente, sentido] sharp, keen; [ingenio] ready, lively; [crítica] penetrating; [observación] smart, clever; [pregunta] acute, searching
    5) (=gracioso) witty
    6) (Mús) [nota] high, high-pitched; [voz, sonido] piercing
    * * *
    - da adjetivo
    1)
    a) <filo/punta> sharp
    b) < ángulo> acute
    2)
    a) <voz/sonido> high-pitched; < nota> high
    b) < dolor> ( duradero) intense, acute; ( momentáneo) sharp
    c) < crisis> severe
    d) <aumento/descenso> sharp
    3)
    a) ( perspicaz) < persona> quick-witted, sharp; < comentario> shrewd
    b) ( gracioso) <comentario/persona> witty
    c) <sentido/instinto> sharp
    4) < palabra> stressed on the last syllable; < acento> acute
    * * *
    = keen [keener -comp., keenest -sup.], sharp [sharper -comp., sharpest -sup.], trenchant, witty [wittier -comp., wittiest -sup.], perceptive, acute, searing, stinging, heightened, high-pitched, penetrating, razor-sharp, keen-witted, pointy [pointier -comp., pointiest - sup.].
    Ex. Formal logic used to be a keen instrument in the hands of the teacher in his trying of students' souls.
    Ex. 'I'll give it more thought,' she said with a sharp frown, resuming her former posture.
    Ex. However, both BTI and LCSH occasionally use headings of this kind, though one could argue strongly that these are out of place in direct entry methods, and they come in for trenchant criticism from Metcalfe.
    Ex. This book offers pithy and witty advice on how to write, defects in prose style, punctuation, and preparing a manuscript.
    Ex. In their profound and perceptive essay on professionalism, Mary Lee Bundy and Paul Wasserman write at some length on this extraordinary phenomenon, 'the essential timidity of responsibility for solving informational problems and providing unequivocal answers'.
    Ex. In some areas of study, notably the social sciences, the problems vocabulary are acute.
    Ex. His searing and rigorously logical analysis of the '1949 ALA Rules for Entry' is one of my favorite pieces of writing on cataloging.
    Ex. In a stinging rebuke to the American Library Association, Nat Hentoff has criticized the ALA for failing to take action to defend volunteer librarians in Cuba who are being subjected to a brutal crackdown.
    Ex. The heightened level of community awareness has led some local authorities to take the initiative and to become information disseminators in their own right.
    Ex. The noise is a high-pitched whine or hiss the machine emits during operation.
    Ex. In this connection, Ohmes and Jones of the Florida State University Library have offered some rather penetrating insights regarding what they call 'The Other Half of Cataloging'.
    Ex. As mentioned in the first part, developing a razor-sharp memory is not going to occur overnight.
    Ex. She is famous for her series featuring homicide detective Peter Decker and his keen-witted, beautiful wife.
    Ex. So much so that my canines (or eye-teeth, they're the pointy ones) ended up growing over my incisors/first molars rather than between them.
    ----
    * acento agudo = acute.
    * de vista aguda = sharp-eyed.
    * dolor agudo = twinge.
    * Enfermedad + aguda = acute + Enfermedad, a bad case of + Enfermedad.
    * infección aguda = acute infection.
    * miastenia aguda = myasthenia gravis.
    * SARS (Síndrome Respiratorio Agudo y Grave) = SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome).
    * * *
    - da adjetivo
    1)
    a) <filo/punta> sharp
    b) < ángulo> acute
    2)
    a) <voz/sonido> high-pitched; < nota> high
    b) < dolor> ( duradero) intense, acute; ( momentáneo) sharp
    c) < crisis> severe
    d) <aumento/descenso> sharp
    3)
    a) ( perspicaz) < persona> quick-witted, sharp; < comentario> shrewd
    b) ( gracioso) <comentario/persona> witty
    c) <sentido/instinto> sharp
    4) < palabra> stressed on the last syllable; < acento> acute
    * * *
    = keen [keener -comp., keenest -sup.], sharp [sharper -comp., sharpest -sup.], trenchant, witty [wittier -comp., wittiest -sup.], perceptive, acute, searing, stinging, heightened, high-pitched, penetrating, razor-sharp, keen-witted, pointy [pointier -comp., pointiest - sup.].

    Ex: Formal logic used to be a keen instrument in the hands of the teacher in his trying of students' souls.

    Ex: 'I'll give it more thought,' she said with a sharp frown, resuming her former posture.
    Ex: However, both BTI and LCSH occasionally use headings of this kind, though one could argue strongly that these are out of place in direct entry methods, and they come in for trenchant criticism from Metcalfe.
    Ex: This book offers pithy and witty advice on how to write, defects in prose style, punctuation, and preparing a manuscript.
    Ex: In their profound and perceptive essay on professionalism, Mary Lee Bundy and Paul Wasserman write at some length on this extraordinary phenomenon, 'the essential timidity of responsibility for solving informational problems and providing unequivocal answers'.
    Ex: In some areas of study, notably the social sciences, the problems vocabulary are acute.
    Ex: His searing and rigorously logical analysis of the '1949 ALA Rules for Entry' is one of my favorite pieces of writing on cataloging.
    Ex: In a stinging rebuke to the American Library Association, Nat Hentoff has criticized the ALA for failing to take action to defend volunteer librarians in Cuba who are being subjected to a brutal crackdown.
    Ex: The heightened level of community awareness has led some local authorities to take the initiative and to become information disseminators in their own right.
    Ex: The noise is a high-pitched whine or hiss the machine emits during operation.
    Ex: In this connection, Ohmes and Jones of the Florida State University Library have offered some rather penetrating insights regarding what they call 'The Other Half of Cataloging'.
    Ex: As mentioned in the first part, developing a razor-sharp memory is not going to occur overnight.
    Ex: She is famous for her series featuring homicide detective Peter Decker and his keen-witted, beautiful wife.
    Ex: So much so that my canines (or eye-teeth, they're the pointy ones) ended up growing over my incisors/first molars rather than between them.
    * acento agudo = acute.
    * de vista aguda = sharp-eyed.
    * dolor agudo = twinge.
    * Enfermedad + aguda = acute + Enfermedad, a bad case of + Enfermedad.
    * infección aguda = acute infection.
    * miastenia aguda = myasthenia gravis.
    * SARS (Síndrome Respiratorio Agudo y Grave) = SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome).

    * * *
    agudo -da
    A
    1 ‹filo/punta› sharp
    2 ‹ángulo› acute
    B
    1 ‹voz› high-pitched; (irritante) shrill; ‹sonido› high-pitched; (irritante) piercing; ‹nota› high
    2 ‹dolor› (duradero) intense, acute; (momentáneo) sharp
    3 ‹crisis› severe
    4 ‹aumento/descenso› sharp
    un agudo descenso del índice de mortalidad a sharp fall in the death rate
    C
    1 (perspicaz) ‹persona› quick-witted, sharp; ‹observación/comentario› shrewd; ‹pregunta› shrewd, searching
    2 (gracioso) ‹comentario/persona› witty
    3 ‹vista› sharp; ‹oído› sharp, acute; ‹sentido/instinto› keen, sharp
    D
    1 ‹palabra› stressed on the last syllable
    2 ‹acento› acute
    * * *

     

    agudo
    ◊ -da adjetivo

    1
    a)filo/punta sharp

    b) ángulo acute

    2
    a)voz/sonido high-pitched;

    nota high
    b) dolor› ( duradero) intense, acute;

    ( momentáneo) sharp
    c) crisis severe

    d)aumento/descenso sharp

    3

    comentario shrewd
    b) ( gracioso) ‹comentario/persona witty

    c)sentido/instinto sharp

    agudo,-a adjetivo
    1 (sensación, enfermedad) acute
    2 (tono de voz) high-pitched
    (sonido) treble, high
    3 (ingenioso) witty
    4 (oído, vista, olfato) sharp, keen
    ' agudo' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    aguda
    - fina
    - fino
    - ingeniosa
    - ingenioso
    - lista
    - listo
    - sagaz
    - estridente
    - ladino
    - pinchazo
    - pitido
    - quejido
    English:
    acute
    - crack
    - high
    - high-pitched
    - keen
    - piping
    - quick
    - quick-witted
    - raging
    - sharp
    - shrill
    - witty
    - yap
    * * *
    agudo, -a
    adj
    1. [filo, punta] sharp
    2. [vista, olfato] keen
    3. [crisis, problema, enfermedad] serious, acute
    4. [dolor] intense;
    sentí un dolor agudo al mover el brazo I felt a sharp pain when I moved my arm
    5. [sonido, voz] high, high-pitched
    6. [perspicaz] [persona] sharp, shrewd;
    [ingenio] keen, sharp
    7. [ingenioso] witty;
    estás muy agudo you're on form o very witty today;
    Irónico
    ¡muy agudo! [cuando algo no es gracioso] very clever o funny!;
    [cuando algo es evidente] very observant!
    8. Gram [palabra] stressed on the last syllable
    9. Gram [tilde] acute
    nm
    agudos [sonidos] treble
    * * *
    adj
    1 acute
    2 ( afilado) sharp
    3 sonido high-pitched
    4 ( perspicaz) sharp
    :
    acento agudo acute accent
    * * *
    agudo, -da adj
    1) : acute, sharp
    2) : shrill, high-pitched
    3) perspicaz: clever, shrewd
    * * *
    agudo adj
    1. (en general) sharp
    2. (sonido, voz) high / high pitched
    3. (ángulo, dolor) acute
    4. (comentario) witty [comp. wittier; superl. wittiest]
    5. (sentido) keen
    "sofá" es una palabra aguda the accent is on the last syllable in "sofá"

    Spanish-English dictionary > agudo

  • 18 aguja de jareta

    (n.) = bodkin
    Ex. Then he unlocked the forme on the stone and, with a bodkin in the palm of his right hand, he lifted out the wrong letters and put the right ones in their place.
    * * *
    (n.) = bodkin

    Ex: Then he unlocked the forme on the stone and, with a bodkin in the palm of his right hand, he lifted out the wrong letters and put the right ones in their place.

    Spanish-English dictionary > aguja de jareta

  • 19 al mismo tiempo

    at the same time
    * * *
    = at once, at the same time, concurrently, in the process, simultaneously, contemporaneously, at the same instant, in parallel, concomitantly, at the one time, all the while
    Ex. Because not all files need to be reorganized at once, but only those which are very full, the time required for this procedure is reduced to a minimum.
    Ex. Author entry gives direct access to particular documents whilst at the same time collocating documents with the same author.
    Ex. An indexer who is familiar with a given indexing language may be capable of accomplishing the three stages concurrently.
    Ex. This may help in subject organisation, but one of the main advantages of an alphabetical sequence, its self-evident order, is sacrificed in the process.
    Ex. No one catalogue can satisfy all the requirements of all users simultaneously.
    Ex. Vernon Tate did a publicity job similar to Peter Record's for the improvement of American thesis bibliography more or less contemporaneously with him.
    Ex. He then dropped the metal suddenly into the mouth of the mould, and at the same instant gave it a jerk or toss to force the metal into the recesses of the matrix (the precise form of the jerk varying with the different letters).
    Ex. The afternoon sessions will run in parallel.
    Ex. Concomitantly, the cost effectiveness and efficiency of computer processing has led to a proliferation of on-line data bases.
    Ex. For example, an obvious question is do most people only have one book on the go at the one time?.
    Ex. The males are the ones who bob and bow and hop around, warbling all the while.
    * * *
    = at once, at the same time, concurrently, in the process, simultaneously, contemporaneously, at the same instant, in parallel, concomitantly, at the one time, all the while

    Ex: Because not all files need to be reorganized at once, but only those which are very full, the time required for this procedure is reduced to a minimum.

    Ex: Author entry gives direct access to particular documents whilst at the same time collocating documents with the same author.
    Ex: An indexer who is familiar with a given indexing language may be capable of accomplishing the three stages concurrently.
    Ex: This may help in subject organisation, but one of the main advantages of an alphabetical sequence, its self-evident order, is sacrificed in the process.
    Ex: No one catalogue can satisfy all the requirements of all users simultaneously.
    Ex: Vernon Tate did a publicity job similar to Peter Record's for the improvement of American thesis bibliography more or less contemporaneously with him.
    Ex: He then dropped the metal suddenly into the mouth of the mould, and at the same instant gave it a jerk or toss to force the metal into the recesses of the matrix (the precise form of the jerk varying with the different letters).
    Ex: The afternoon sessions will run in parallel.
    Ex: Concomitantly, the cost effectiveness and efficiency of computer processing has led to a proliferation of on-line data bases.
    Ex: For example, an obvious question is do most people only have one book on the go at the one time?.
    Ex: The males are the ones who bob and bow and hop around, warbling all the while.

    Spanish-English dictionary > al mismo tiempo

  • 20 alguna vez

    adv.
    1 occasionally, once, sometimes.
    2 ever.
    * * *
    sometimes 2 (en pregunta) ever
    ¿has estado alguna vez allí? have you ever been there?
    * * *
    = ever, on any one occasion
    Ex. And then, emitting a short laugh, she said: 'if they ever do it!'.
    Ex. On any one occasion there will always be children who do not want to borrow or buy, but they are still learning to live with books and how to search out the ones that interest them.
    * * *
    = ever, on any one occasion

    Ex: And then, emitting a short laugh, she said: 'if they ever do it!'.

    Ex: On any one occasion there will always be children who do not want to borrow or buy, but they are still learning to live with books and how to search out the ones that interest them.

    Spanish-English dictionary > alguna vez

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