Translation: from slovene to english

from english to slovene

the moment that

  • 1 čàsъ

    čàsъ Grammatical information: m. o Accent paradigm: a Proto-Slavic meaning: `time'
    Page in Trubačev: IV 27-30
    Old Church Slavic:
    časъ `time, moment, hour' [m o]
    Russian:
    čas `hour, moment' [m o], čása [Gens], časý [Nom p] \{1\}
    Czech:
    čas `time, weather' [m o]
    Slovak:
    čas `time, weather' [m o]
    Polish:
    czas `time' [m o]
    Slovincian:
    čȧ̃s `time' [m o]
    Serbo-Croatian:
    čȁs `moment' [m o];
    Čak. čȁs (Vrgada, Novi) `moment' [m o], čȁsa [Gens]
    Slovene:
    čàs `time' [m o], čása [Gens]
    Bulgarian:
    čas `hour' [m o]
    Old Prussian:
    kīsman `time' [Accs]
    Comments: The root may be reconstructed as * k(ʷ)eh₁s-, but it has been suggested that the *s belongs to the suffix, the root * (i.e. * keh₁) being a variant of * kē(i), cf. Skt. cā́yati. For the latter verb I have reconstructed *kweh₁i-e/o- (-> *čàjati).
    Other cognates:
    Alb. kohë `time, weather' [f]
    Notes:
    \{1\} AP (a) in Old Russian (Zaliznjak 1985: 134).

    Slovenščina-angleščina big slovar > čàsъ

  • 2 da

    that, yes

    Slovenian-english dictionary > da

  • 3 tisti

    that, that, those

    Slovenian-english dictionary > tisti

  • 4 trenutek

    instant, moment, point

    Slovenian-english dictionary > trenutek

  • 5 trenutno

    currently, moment

    Slovenian-english dictionary > trenutno

  • 6 àbolnь

    àbolnь; àblonь Grammatical information: f. i Accent paradigm: a Proto-Slavic meaning: `apple-tree'
    Page in Trubačev: I 42-43, 47-48
    Church Slavic:
    ablanь (MBulg.) `apple-tree' [f i]
    Russian:
    jáblon' `apple-tree' [f i] \{2\}
    Old Russian:
    ablanь `apple-tree' [f i];
    jablonь `apple-tree' [f i]
    Czech:
    jabloň `apple-tree' [f i]
    Polish:
    jabɫoń `apple-tree' [f i]
    Upper Sorbian:
    jaboɫń `apple-tree' \{1\}
    Slovene:
    jáblan `apple-tree' [f i];
    jáblana `apple-tree' [f ā]
    Proto-Balto-Slavic reconstruction: aʔb-ol-ni-; aʔb-el-i- \{3\}
    Lithuanian:
    obelìs `apple-tree' [f i] 3a;
    obelė̃ `apple-tree' [f ē] 3a
    Latvian:
    âbele `apple-tree' [f ē];
    âbels `apple-tree' [f i]
    Old Prussian:
    wobalne `apple-tree' [f]
    Indo-European reconstruction: h₂eb-ol-n-i-; h₂eb-el-i-
    IE meaning: apple-tree
    Certainty: +
    Page in Pokorny: 1
    Other cognates:
    OIr. aball `apple-tree' [f];
    W afall `apple-tree' [f]
    Notes:
    \{1\} According to Schuster-Šewc (s.v. jabɫoń), USrb. jaboɫń is a hapax. \{2\} The current modern Russian form is jáblonja. \{3\} We find several forms which indicate that we are dealing with an old consonant stem, e.g. Gens. óbels or óbeles, Genp. obelų̃.

    Slovenščina-angleščina big slovar > àbolnь

  • 7 àblonь

    àbolnь; àblonь Grammatical information: f. i Accent paradigm: a Proto-Slavic meaning: `apple-tree'
    Page in Trubačev: I 42-43, 47-48
    Church Slavic:
    ablanь (MBulg.) `apple-tree' [f i]
    Russian:
    jáblon' `apple-tree' [f i] \{2\}
    Old Russian:
    ablanь `apple-tree' [f i];
    jablonь `apple-tree' [f i]
    Czech:
    jabloň `apple-tree' [f i]
    Polish:
    jabɫoń `apple-tree' [f i]
    Upper Sorbian:
    jaboɫń `apple-tree' \{1\}
    Slovene:
    jáblan `apple-tree' [f i];
    jáblana `apple-tree' [f ā]
    Proto-Balto-Slavic reconstruction: aʔb-ol-ni-; aʔb-el-i- \{3\}
    Lithuanian:
    obelìs `apple-tree' [f i] 3a;
    obelė̃ `apple-tree' [f ē] 3a
    Latvian:
    âbele `apple-tree' [f ē];
    âbels `apple-tree' [f i]
    Old Prussian:
    wobalne `apple-tree' [f]
    Indo-European reconstruction: h₂eb-ol-n-i-; h₂eb-el-i-
    IE meaning: apple-tree
    Certainty: +
    Page in Pokorny: 1
    Other cognates:
    OIr. aball `apple-tree' [f];
    W afall `apple-tree' [f]
    Notes:
    \{1\} According to Schuster-Šewc (s.v. jabɫoń), USrb. jaboɫń is a hapax. \{2\} The current modern Russian form is jáblonja. \{3\} We find several forms which indicate that we are dealing with an old consonant stem, e.g. Gens. óbels or óbeles, Genp. obelų̃.

    Slovenščina-angleščina big slovar > àblonь

  • 8 akъ(jь)

    akъ(jь) Grammatical information: prn. Proto-Slavic meaning: `such as'
    Page in Trubačev: VIII 171
    Old Church Slavic:
    jakъ (Mar., Zogr., Supr.) `such as' [pron]
    Czech:
    jaký `what (kind of), which' [pron]
    Slovak:
    jaký `what (kind of), which' [pron]
    Polish:
    jaki `what (kind of), which' [pron]
    Upper Sorbian:
    jakny `outstanding, strong' [pron]
    Serbo-Croatian:
    jȃk `strong, healthy' [adj o], jáka [Nomsf], jáko [Nomsf];
    Čak. jå̑k `strong, healthy' [adj o], jå̄kȁ [Nomsf], jå̑ko [Nomsn]
    Slovene:
    jȃk `strong, prominent, superb, brave' [adj o]
    Bulgarian:
    jakyj `strong, healthy' [adj o]
    Comments: I endorse the hypothesis that the meaning `strong', attested in South Slavic and Upper Sorbian, is secondary, cf. Rum. tare `strong' from * talis `such' (Meyer-Lübke 1935: 705).

    Slovenščina-angleščina big slovar > akъ(jь)

  • 9 às(ъ)trę̄bъ

    às(ъ)trę̄bъ; às(ъ)trě̄bъ Grammatical information: m. o Accent paradigm: a Proto-Slavic meaning: `hawk'
    Page in Trubačev: I 83-85
    Russian:
    jástreb `hawk' [m o]
    Old Russian:
    jastrjabъ `hawk' [m o];
    jastrebъ `hawk' [m o]
    Ukrainian:
    jástrib `hawk' [m o];
    astrjáb (dial.) `hawk' [m o];
    jástrjab `hawk' [m o]
    Czech:
    jestřáb `hawk' [m o]
    Old Czech:
    jestřáb `hawk' [m o];
    jěstřáb `hawk' [m o]
    Slovak:
    jastrab `hawk' [m o]
    Polish:
    jastrząb `hawk' [m jo], jastrzębia [Gens] \{1\}
    Slovincian:
    jȧ̃střïb `hawk' [m o]
    Upper Sorbian:
    jatřob `hawk' [m jo]
    Lower Sorbian:
    jastśeb `hawk' [m jo]
    Serbo-Croatian:
    jȁstrijeb `hawk' [m o];
    Čak. jȁstrēb (Vrgada) `hawk' [m o];
    Čak. jãstrop (Orlec) `hawk' [m o]
    Slovene:
    jȃstreb `hawk' [m o]
    Bulgarian:
    jástreb `hawk' [m o]
    Comments: As far as I can see, there are no serious objections to the daring etymology *h₁oh₁ḱu-ptr- `fast-flier' (Vey 1953). According to Vey, the Slovene falling tone points to the former presence of a weak jer in the medial syllable, but it seems to me that the neo-circumflex may also reflect original posttonic length. The compound has nice parallels in Homeric ἴρηξ ὠκύπτερος Ν 62 `a swift-winged hawk (or falcon)' and Lat. accipiter `hawk, falcon'.
    Other cognates:
    Gk. ὠκύπτερος (Il.) `swift-flying' [adj];
    Lat. accipiter `hawk, falcon'
    Notes:
    \{1\} The original Gsg. jastrzęba was replaced by jastrzębia on the analogy of goɫąb, Gsg. goɫębia `pigeon' (Bańkowski 2000: 577).

    Slovenščina-angleščina big slovar > às(ъ)trę̄bъ

  • 10 às(ъ)trě̄bъ

    às(ъ)trę̄bъ; às(ъ)trě̄bъ Grammatical information: m. o Accent paradigm: a Proto-Slavic meaning: `hawk'
    Page in Trubačev: I 83-85
    Russian:
    jástreb `hawk' [m o]
    Old Russian:
    jastrjabъ `hawk' [m o];
    jastrebъ `hawk' [m o]
    Ukrainian:
    jástrib `hawk' [m o];
    astrjáb (dial.) `hawk' [m o];
    jástrjab `hawk' [m o]
    Czech:
    jestřáb `hawk' [m o]
    Old Czech:
    jestřáb `hawk' [m o];
    jěstřáb `hawk' [m o]
    Slovak:
    jastrab `hawk' [m o]
    Polish:
    jastrząb `hawk' [m jo], jastrzębia [Gens] \{1\}
    Slovincian:
    jȧ̃střïb `hawk' [m o]
    Upper Sorbian:
    jatřob `hawk' [m jo]
    Lower Sorbian:
    jastśeb `hawk' [m jo]
    Serbo-Croatian:
    jȁstrijeb `hawk' [m o];
    Čak. jȁstrēb (Vrgada) `hawk' [m o];
    Čak. jãstrop (Orlec) `hawk' [m o]
    Slovene:
    jȃstreb `hawk' [m o]
    Bulgarian:
    jástreb `hawk' [m o]
    Comments: As far as I can see, there are no serious objections to the daring etymology *h₁oh₁ḱu-ptr- `fast-flier' (Vey 1953). According to Vey, the Slovene falling tone points to the former presence of a weak jer in the medial syllable, but it seems to me that the neo-circumflex may also reflect original posttonic length. The compound has nice parallels in Homeric ἴρηξ ὠκύπτερος Ν 62 `a swift-winged hawk (or falcon)' and Lat. accipiter `hawk, falcon'.
    Other cognates:
    Gk. ὠκύπτερος (Il.) `swift-flying' [adj];
    Lat. accipiter `hawk, falcon'
    Notes:
    \{1\} The original Gsg. jastrzęba was replaced by jastrzębia on the analogy of goɫąb, Gsg. goɫębia `pigeon' (Bańkowski 2000: 577).

    Slovenščina-angleščina big slovar > às(ъ)trě̄bъ

  • 11 aščerъ

    aščerъ Grammatical information: m. o Proto-Slavic meaning: `lizard'
    Page in Trubačev: I 87-89
    Old Church Slavic:
    aštera (Supr.) `lizard' [Gensm o]
    Russian:
    jáščer `inflammation of the tongue (cattle, horses)' [m o];
    jáščerica `lizard' [f jā]
    Czech:
    ještěr `saurian, dragon' [m o];
    ještěrka `lizard' [f ā];
    ještěřice (rare) `lizard' [m o]
    Polish:
    jaszczur `salamander, saurian' [m o];
    jaszczurka `lizard' [f ā];
    jaszczór (dial.) `lizard' [m o]
    Slovincian:
    vješčìe̯řäcă `lizard' [f ā]
    Serbo-Croatian:
    jȁster (obs.) `lizard' [m o];
    jȁšterica `vesicle on the tongue' [f jā];
    Čak. jȁšćerica (Vrgada) `vesicle on the tongue' [f jā]
    Slovene:
    jȃščerica `green lizard' [f jā];
    jȃščarica `green lizard' [f jā]
    Lithuanian:
    skėrỹs `locust' [m io]
    Latvian:
    sk̨ìrgaîlis `lizard' [m io];
    sk̨ir̃gaila `lizard' [f ā]
    Old Prussian:
    estureito `lizard'
    Page in Pokorny: 933
    Comments: Though the details would remain unclear, there is definitely possibility that this is a substratum word showing prefixation of a non-Indo-European type (cf. Schrijver 1997: 307-312). Among the alternative solutions, the analysis *h₁oh₁ḱu-sker-, a compound of the word for `quick' and the verbal root that is found in Gk. σκαίρω `frisk' as well as probably Lith. skėrỹs `harvestman, daddy-long-legs' and Latv. šk̨ìrgaîlis2, seems the most attractive (Vey 1953, see also -> *astrębъ).
    Other cognates:
    Gk. ἀσκαρίς `worm in the intestines, larva of a mosquit o' [f];

    Slovenščina-angleščina big slovar > aščerъ

  • 12 avě

    avě Grammatical information: adv. Proto-Slavic meaning: `manifestly'
    Page in Trubačev: I 93-94
    Old Church Slavic:
    javě `manifestly, openly, clearly' [adv];
    avě `manifestly, openly, clearly' [adv]
    Serbo-Croatian:
    javi `manifestly, openly' [adv]
    Bulgarian:
    áve `in reality' [adv];
    jáve `in reality' [adv]
    Macedonian:
    jave `in reality' [adv]
    Lithuanian:
    ovyje (DP) `in reality' [adv]
    Indo-European reconstruction: h₂ēu-ēis
    IE meaning: apparently
    Certainty: +
    Page in Pokorny: 78
    Comments: OLith. ovyje `in reality' is sometimes regarded as a borrowing from Slavic but there are no compelling arguments for this view. The absence of initial j- rather points in the direction of an etymological relationship, cf. jovnai `openly', which is a borrowing from Belorussian. In that case we would have to start from a PBSl. i-stem *āv-i- (cf. Anikin 1998: 21, see also s.v. javiti). On the other hand, it seems possible that the form ovyje, whose oldest attestations are two occurrences in Daukša, is based on Church Slavic (j)avě. The Slavic adverb in turn may have been borrowed from Iranian (Lubotsky p.c.).
    Other cognates:
    Skt. āvíṣ `apparently, noticeably' [adv];
    Av. auuiš `apparently, evidently' [adv]

    Slovenščina-angleščina big slovar > avě

  • 13 aviti

    aviti Grammatical information: v. Proto-Slavic meaning: `show'
    Page in Trubačev: I 94-95
    Old Church Slavic:
    javiti `show, reveal' [verb];
    aviti `show, reveal' [verb]
    Russian:
    javít' `show, display' [verb], javljú [1sg], jávit [3sg]
    Czech:
    jeviti `show' [verb]
    Polish:
    jawić (obs.) `show' [verb]
    Serbo-Croatian:
    jáviti `inform' [verb], jȃvīm [1sg];
    Čak. jå̑vȉti (Vrgada) `inform?' [verb], jå̃viš [2sg];
    Čak. jāvȉt (Vrgada) `(se) greet, answer' [verb], jãve [3sg]
    Slovene:
    jáviti `announce' [verb], jávim [1sg]
    Lithuanian:
    ovytis `appear' [verb], ovijasi [3sg] \{1\}
    Page in Pokorny: 78
    Notes:
    \{1\} Lith. (arch.) ovytis `appear' derives from the i-stem which must underlie ovyje `in reality'. Fraenkel (I: 519) claims that ovytis `appear; rage' and Latv. âvîtiês `talk nonsense, get up to mischief' are inherited words cognate with óvaidas (< *avi-vaidas) `rowdy, braggart', while Lith. jė́vaidas (< *jeva-vaidas) `ghost' and Latv. jàvîtiês or jâvîtiês `to behave like an idiot' are borrowings from Slavic (see also Anikin: 22). I am not convinced that this solution, which seems to rely exclusively on the presence or absence of j-, is correct. Moreover, it is not obvious that ovytis `appear' and ovytis (also jõvytis) `rage' are cognates. It seems quite possible that Lith. óvaidas must be connected with Ukr. (dial.) jávida `devil', Ru. (dial.) jávidь `snake'.

    Slovenščina-angleščina big slovar > aviti

  • 14 azъ

    azъ Grammatical information: prn. Proto-Slavic meaning: `I'
    Page in Trubačev: I 100-103
    Old Church Slavic:
    azъ `I' [prnprs]
    Russian:
    ja `I' [prnprs]
    Old Russian:
    (j)azъ `I' [prnprs]
    Czech:
    já `I' [prnprs]
    Old Czech:
    jáz `I' [prnprs]
    Polish:
    ja `I' [prnprs]
    Old Polish:
    jaz (Flor.) `I' [prnprs] \{1\};
    ja `I' [prnprs]
    Serbo-Croatian:
    jȃ `I' [prnprs];
    jȁz (dial.) `I' [prnprs];
    Čak. jå̃ (Vrgada) `I' [prnprs];
    Čak. jȁ (Novi) `I' [prnprs];
    Čak. jã (Orbanići) `I, me' [prnprs]
    Slovene:
    jàz `I' [prnprs]
    Bulgarian:
    az `I' [prnprs];
    ja (dial.) `I' [prnprs]
    Proto-Balto-Slavic reconstruction: eʔź-um; eś (?)
    Lithuanian:
    àš `I' [prnprs];
    (OLith.) `I' [prnprs]
    Latvian:
    es `I' [prnprs];
    ęs (dial.) `I' [prnprs]
    Old Prussian:
    as `I' [prnprs];
    es `I' [prnprs]
    Indo-European reconstruction: h₁eǵ-H-om
    IE meaning: I
    Page in Pokorny: 291
    Comments: The distribution of * jazъ and *ja suggest that the latter form is a Proto-Slavic innovation (Kortlandt forthc.).
    Other cognates:
    Skt. ahám `I' [prnprs];
    Gk. ἐγώ `I' [prnprs];
    Go. ik `I' [prnprs]
    Notes:
    \{1\} Possibly a Bohemianism.

    Slovenščina-angleščina big slovar > azъ

  • 15 badli

    badli Grammatical information: m. ī Proto-Slavic meaning: `enchanter, healer, physician'
    Page in Trubačev: I 150
    Old Church Slavic:
    balii `physician' [m iā];
    bali (Cloz.) `physician' [m iā] \{1\}
    Church Slavic:
    bali (OSln.: FrD) `healer, Saviour' [m iā]
    Old Russian:
    balii `physician, enchanter' [m iā];
    balija `physician, enchanter' [m iā]
    Indo-European reconstruction: bʰeh₂-dʰl-
    IE meaning: enchanter
    Page in Pokorny: 105
    Comments: There is no direct evidence for a suffix *dʰl-ьji-, but the form bali from the Freising Fragments could be regarded as counter-evidence, as dl is regularly retained in this dialect, cf. modliti. It is not impossible, however, that bali is of Church Slavic origin. Trubačëv bases his reconstructions *badlьji and *badlovati chiefly on derivatives of the type of OCz. předlí `spinster', švadlí `needlewoman'. According to the ESSJa (I 137-138), further evidence for a suffix *-dʰl- is provided by SCr. bȁjalo m. `sorcerer', Ru. dial. bájala m.f. `talker, chatterer, story-teller', which may be transformations of *badlьji. Meillet's idea (1902-1905: I 417) that * bali is based on a derivative in -l- deserves consideration.
    Notes:
    \{1\} Cf. balovanije `treatment', balьstvo `cure, medicine'.

    Slovenščina-angleščina big slovar > badli

  • 16 bagno

    bagno Grammatical information: n. o Accent paradigm: b? Proto-Slavic meaning: `marsh'
    Page in Trubačev: I 125-127
    Russian:
    bagnó (dial.) `marshy place, wild rosemary' [n o]
    Ukrainian:
    bahnó `marsh, mud, wild rosemary' [n o]
    Czech:
    bahno `marsh' [n o];
    báhno (Jungmann) `marsh' [n o] \{1\}
    Old Czech:
    bahno `marsh' [n o]
    Slovak:
    bahno `bog, large marsh' [n o]
    Polish:
    bagno `bog, marsh, wild rosemary' [n o]
    Slovincian:
    bȧ̃gno `wild rosemary' [n o]
    Upper Sorbian:
    bahno `marsh, silt' [n o]
    Lower Sorbian:
    bagno `marsh, (dial.) wild rosemary' [n o]
    Indo-European reconstruction: bʰog-no-
    Comments: It is attractive to seek a connection with MoDu. bagger `mud' < *bʰogʰ- and assume that we are dealing with a substratum word. The Slavic etymon is limited to West and East Slavic.
    Notes:
    \{1\} Jungmann mentions both bahno and báhno.

    Slovenščina-angleščina big slovar > bagno

  • 17 bebrъ

    bebrъ; bobrъ; bьbrъ Grammatical information: m. o Accent paradigm: b Proto-Slavic meaning: `beaver'
    Page in Trubačev: I 174-175; II 145-146; III 159
    Church Slavic:
    bebrъ `beaver' [m o];
    bobrъ `beaver' [m o]
    Russian:
    bobr `beaver' [m o], bobrá [Gens];
    bobër `beaver (fur)' [m o], bobrá [Gens]
    Old Russian:
    bebrъ `beaver' [m o];
    bobrъ `beaver' [m o];
    bьbrъ `beaver' [m o]
    Ukrainian:
    bibr `beaver' [m o], bobrá [Gens]
    Czech:
    bobr `beaver' [m o]
    Polish:
    bóbr `beaver' [m o], bobra [Gens]
    Serbo-Croatian:
    dȁbar `beaver' [m o]
    Slovene:
    bóbǝr `beaver' [m o];
    bébǝr `beaver' [m o]
    Bulgarian:
    bóbăr `beaver' [m o]
    Proto-Balto-Slavic reconstruction: bebros
    Lithuanian:
    bẽbras `beaver' [m o] 2;
    bebrùs `beaver' [m u] 4
    Latvian:
    bębrs `beaver' [m o]
    Old Prussian:
    bebrus (EV) `beaver' [m o]
    Indo-European reconstruction: bʰebʰrH-u- (bʰebʰrH-o-)
    Comments: Possibly a derivative of the word for `brown', cf. Lith. bė́ras, with reduplication of the root. The fact that this etymon was not affected by the generalization of accentual mobility in the masculine o-stems points may be be accounted for by positing a u-stem.
    Other cognates:
    Skt. babhrú- `reddish brown' [adj];
    Lat. fiber `beaver'
    ;
    OHG bibar `beaver'
    ;
    OE beofor `beaver'

    Slovenščina-angleščina big slovar > bebrъ

  • 18 bobrъ

    bebrъ; bobrъ; bьbrъ Grammatical information: m. o Accent paradigm: b Proto-Slavic meaning: `beaver'
    Page in Trubačev: I 174-175; II 145-146; III 159
    Church Slavic:
    bebrъ `beaver' [m o];
    bobrъ `beaver' [m o]
    Russian:
    bobr `beaver' [m o], bobrá [Gens];
    bobër `beaver (fur)' [m o], bobrá [Gens]
    Old Russian:
    bebrъ `beaver' [m o];
    bobrъ `beaver' [m o];
    bьbrъ `beaver' [m o]
    Ukrainian:
    bibr `beaver' [m o], bobrá [Gens]
    Czech:
    bobr `beaver' [m o]
    Polish:
    bóbr `beaver' [m o], bobra [Gens]
    Serbo-Croatian:
    dȁbar `beaver' [m o]
    Slovene:
    bóbǝr `beaver' [m o];
    bébǝr `beaver' [m o]
    Bulgarian:
    bóbăr `beaver' [m o]
    Proto-Balto-Slavic reconstruction: bebros
    Lithuanian:
    bẽbras `beaver' [m o] 2;
    bebrùs `beaver' [m u] 4
    Latvian:
    bębrs `beaver' [m o]
    Old Prussian:
    bebrus (EV) `beaver' [m o]
    Indo-European reconstruction: bʰebʰrH-u- (bʰebʰrH-o-)
    Comments: Possibly a derivative of the word for `brown', cf. Lith. bė́ras, with reduplication of the root. The fact that this etymon was not affected by the generalization of accentual mobility in the masculine o-stems points may be be accounted for by positing a u-stem.
    Other cognates:
    Skt. babhrú- `reddish brown' [adj];
    Lat. fiber `beaver'
    ;
    OHG bibar `beaver'
    ;
    OE beofor `beaver'

    Slovenščina-angleščina big slovar > bobrъ

  • 19 bьbrъ

    bebrъ; bobrъ; bьbrъ Grammatical information: m. o Accent paradigm: b Proto-Slavic meaning: `beaver'
    Page in Trubačev: I 174-175; II 145-146; III 159
    Church Slavic:
    bebrъ `beaver' [m o];
    bobrъ `beaver' [m o]
    Russian:
    bobr `beaver' [m o], bobrá [Gens];
    bobër `beaver (fur)' [m o], bobrá [Gens]
    Old Russian:
    bebrъ `beaver' [m o];
    bobrъ `beaver' [m o];
    bьbrъ `beaver' [m o]
    Ukrainian:
    bibr `beaver' [m o], bobrá [Gens]
    Czech:
    bobr `beaver' [m o]
    Polish:
    bóbr `beaver' [m o], bobra [Gens]
    Serbo-Croatian:
    dȁbar `beaver' [m o]
    Slovene:
    bóbǝr `beaver' [m o];
    bébǝr `beaver' [m o]
    Bulgarian:
    bóbăr `beaver' [m o]
    Proto-Balto-Slavic reconstruction: bebros
    Lithuanian:
    bẽbras `beaver' [m o] 2;
    bebrùs `beaver' [m u] 4
    Latvian:
    bębrs `beaver' [m o]
    Old Prussian:
    bebrus (EV) `beaver' [m o]
    Indo-European reconstruction: bʰebʰrH-u- (bʰebʰrH-o-)
    Comments: Possibly a derivative of the word for `brown', cf. Lith. bė́ras, with reduplication of the root. The fact that this etymon was not affected by the generalization of accentual mobility in the masculine o-stems points may be be accounted for by positing a u-stem.
    Other cognates:
    Skt. babhrú- `reddish brown' [adj];
    Lat. fiber `beaver'
    ;
    OHG bibar `beaver'
    ;
    OE beofor `beaver'

    Slovenščina-angleščina big slovar > bьbrъ

  • 20 bèrdjь

    bèrdjь Grammatical information: adj. jo Accent paradigm: a Proto-Slavic meaning: `with young, pregnant'
    Page in Trubačev: I 188-189
    Church Slavic:
    brěžda `pregnant' [Nomsgf];
    brěž(d)a (RuCS) `pregnant' [Nomsgf]
    Russian:
    beréžaja (dial.) `in foal' [Nomsgf];
    berëžaja (dial.) `mare in foal' [Nomsgf]
    Ukrainian:
    beréža `with young' [Nomsgf]
    Czech:
    březí `with young, pregnant' [Nomsgf]
    Old Czech:
    břězí `with young, pregnant' [Nomsgf]
    Serbo-Croatian:
    brȅđ (W. dial.) `pregnant, (Cr.) in calf' [adj jo];
    Čak. brȅja (Orbanići) `pregnant (of a cow), with young' [Nomsgf]
    Slovene:
    brẹ́ja `with young' [Nomsgf]
    Proto-Balto-Slavic reconstruction: berʔdios
    Lithuanian:
    ber̃(g)ždžias `barren (of a cow)' [adj] 4;
    ber(g)ždė̃ `barren cow' [f ē]
    Indo-European reconstruction: bʰerdieh₂
    IE meaning: pregnant
    Comments: Both *bʰerdʰieh₂ and *bʰerHdʰieh₂ would have yielded forba in Latin (see Nussbaum 1999 for the development of *rdʰ originating from syncope). A proto-form *bʰerHdieh₂ would therefore theoretically be possible. Nussbaum, who considers the connection with OCS brěžda possible, suggests that an original noun *bʰori- > *fori `birther' was expanded to *fori-d- and then hypercharacterized as a feminine (1999: 406).
    Other cognates:
    Lat. forda `in calf' [Nomsgf]

    Slovenščina-angleščina big slovar > bèrdjь

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