Translation: from spanish

swarmed

  • 1 Nueva Inglaterra

    f.
    New England State, New England.
    * * *
    * * *
    Ex. News of boundless timber reserves spread, and before long lumberjacks from the thinning hardwood forests of New England swarmed into the uncharted area with no other possessions than their axes and brawn and the clothing they wore.
    * * *

    Ex: News of boundless timber reserves spread, and before long lumberjacks from the thinning hardwood forests of New England swarmed into the uncharted area with no other possessions than their axes and brawn and the clothing they wore.

    * * *
    New England

    Spanish-English dictionary > Nueva Inglaterra

  • 2 a tope

    adv.
    as much as possible.
    * * *
    argot (al límite) flat out 2 (lleno) jam-packed, chock-a-block 3 (estupendo) terrific 4 (música) full blast
    * * *
    (v.) = packed to capacity, in the fast lane, fast lane, choc-a-block, chock-full, in full swing, in full gear, packed to the rafters
    Ex. His small foreign-made car strained with the added burden of an interior packed to capacity with personal belongings and a heavily laden U-Haul trailor attached to the rear.
    Ex. The article 'A charmed brew: document delivery and collection in the fast lane' examines the implications of the proliferation of document delivery services and types of access available for librarians.
    Ex. The article is entitled 'The news librarians: fast lane information professionals' = El artículo se titula "Los documentalistas de los medios de comunicación: profesionales de la información a toda pastilla".
    Ex. The library was choc-a-block with celebrities and children as they swarmed to see the signing of the new Harry Potter book by its author.
    Ex. Herbal cancer remedy is chock-full of drugs.
    Ex. And when the New Year celebrations were in full swing at the moment Britain entered the Community, how many people remember raising their glasses to Europe?.
    Ex. Christmas is merely three weeks away, even if the commercialized aspect of the holidays have been in full gear for over two weeks now.
    Ex. The local church was packed to the rafters for the funeral of a much-loved parish priest who died last month aged 69.
    * * *
    (v.) = packed to capacity, in the fast lane, fast lane, choc-a-block, chock-full, in full swing, in full gear, packed to the rafters

    Ex: His small foreign-made car strained with the added burden of an interior packed to capacity with personal belongings and a heavily laden U-Haul trailor attached to the rear.

    Ex: The article 'A charmed brew: document delivery and collection in the fast lane' examines the implications of the proliferation of document delivery services and types of access available for librarians.
    Ex: The article is entitled 'The news librarians: fast lane information professionals' = El artículo se titula "Los documentalistas de los medios de comunicación: profesionales de la información a toda pastilla".
    Ex: The library was choc-a-block with celebrities and children as they swarmed to see the signing of the new Harry Potter book by its author.
    Ex: Herbal cancer remedy is chock-full of drugs.
    Ex: And when the New Year celebrations were in full swing at the moment Britain entered the Community, how many people remember raising their glasses to Europe?.
    Ex: Christmas is merely three weeks away, even if the commercialized aspect of the holidays have been in full gear for over two weeks now.
    Ex: The local church was packed to the rafters for the funeral of a much-loved parish priest who died last month aged 69.

    Spanish-English dictionary > a tope

  • 3 abarrotado

    adj.
    crammed, packed, completely full, crowded.
    past part.
    past participle of spanish verb: abarrotar.
    * * *
    1→ link=abarrotar abarrotar
    1 (cosas) packed (de, with), crammed (de, with); (personas) jam-packed (de, with), packed (de, with)
    * * *
    (f. - abarrotada)
    adj.
    * * *
    ADJ [sala, tren] packed, jam-packed

    estar abarrotado de — [+ personas] to be packed o jam-packed with; [+ objetos] to be crammed o jam-packed with

    * * *
    - da adjetivo crammed, packed

    abarrotado de algo< de gente> packed o crammed with something

    * * *
    = congested, packed to capacity, overcrowded, bursting at the seams, stuffed looking, choc-a-block, chock-full, cluttered, densely packed, packed, packed to the rafters.
    Ex. To be sure, it still has its congeries of mills and factories, its grimy huddle of frame dwellings and congested tenements, its stark, jagged skyline, but its old face is gradually changing.
    Ex. His small foreign-made car strained with the added burden of an interior packed to capacity with personal belongings and a heavily laden U-Haul trailor attached to the rear.
    Ex. Cooperative storage of materials on a regional or national basis promises to become the best way of coping with overcrowded libraries.
    Ex. The library solved the problems of budget cuts, a library building bursting at the seams, and stock ill matched to some of the courses by switching to the use of on-line search services.
    Ex. As one librarian summarized, 'people are not into the stuffed looking, dingy, dust smelling type of libraries anymore... they expect atmospheres more like coffeehouses or nice bookstores'.
    Ex. The library was choc-a-block with celebrities and children as they swarmed to see the signing of the new Harry Potter book by its author.
    Ex. Herbal cancer remedy is chock-full of drugs.
    Ex. They found him in his habitually cluttered office, buried beneath stacks of paperwork.
    Ex. The square was humble and nondescript, part of a maze of narrow streets and densely packed shops and houses.
    Ex. Here and there, elderly citizens tend tiny, packed shops selling candy and chipped bottles of cold soda.
    Ex. The local church was packed to the rafters for the funeral of a much-loved parish priest who died last month aged 69.
    ----
    * abarrotado (de) = teeming with, bursting with, jam-packed (with), filled to capacity.
    * * *
    - da adjetivo crammed, packed

    abarrotado de algo< de gente> packed o crammed with something

    * * *
    = congested, packed to capacity, overcrowded, bursting at the seams, stuffed looking, choc-a-block, chock-full, cluttered, densely packed, packed, packed to the rafters.

    Ex: To be sure, it still has its congeries of mills and factories, its grimy huddle of frame dwellings and congested tenements, its stark, jagged skyline, but its old face is gradually changing.

    Ex: His small foreign-made car strained with the added burden of an interior packed to capacity with personal belongings and a heavily laden U-Haul trailor attached to the rear.
    Ex: Cooperative storage of materials on a regional or national basis promises to become the best way of coping with overcrowded libraries.
    Ex: The library solved the problems of budget cuts, a library building bursting at the seams, and stock ill matched to some of the courses by switching to the use of on-line search services.
    Ex: As one librarian summarized, 'people are not into the stuffed looking, dingy, dust smelling type of libraries anymore... they expect atmospheres more like coffeehouses or nice bookstores'.
    Ex: The library was choc-a-block with celebrities and children as they swarmed to see the signing of the new Harry Potter book by its author.
    Ex: Herbal cancer remedy is chock-full of drugs.
    Ex: They found him in his habitually cluttered office, buried beneath stacks of paperwork.
    Ex: The square was humble and nondescript, part of a maze of narrow streets and densely packed shops and houses.
    Ex: Here and there, elderly citizens tend tiny, packed shops selling candy and chipped bottles of cold soda.
    Ex: The local church was packed to the rafters for the funeral of a much-loved parish priest who died last month aged 69.
    * abarrotado (de) = teeming with, bursting with, jam-packed (with), filled to capacity.

    * * *
    crammed, packed abarrotado DE algo packed o crammed WITH sth
    estanterías abarrotadas de adornos shelves crammed with ornaments
    el foyer estaba abarrotado de gente the foyer was packed with people
    * * *

    Del verbo abarrotar: ( conjugate abarrotar)

    abarrotado es:

    el participio

    Multiple Entries:
    abarrotado    
    abarrotar
    abarrotado
    ◊ -da adjetivo

    crammed, packed;
    abarrotado de algo ‹ de gente› packed o crammed with sth
    abarrotar ( conjugate abarrotar) verbo transitivosala/teatro to pack
    abarrotado,-a adjetivo packed, crammed [de, with]: no pudimos entrar en el local, estaba abarrotado (de gente), we couldn't get into the place because it was jam-packed with people
    abarrotar verbo transitivo to pack, cram [de, with]: el público abarrotaba el teatro, the theatre was packed (with people)

    ' abarrotado' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    abarrotada
    English:
    astir
    - chock-a-block
    - chock-full
    - overcrowded
    - swarm
    - cluttered
    - congested
    - crowded
    - over
    * * *
    abarrotado, -a adj
    1. [lleno] [teatro, autobús] packed (de with); [desván, baúl] crammed (de with)
    2. Ven
    estar abarrotado de trabajo to have a lot of work
    * * *
    I adj packed
    II partabarrotar
    * * *
    abarrotado, -da adj
    : packed, crammed

    Spanish-English dictionary > abarrotado

  • 4 aglomerarse

    pron.v.
    to agglomerate, form a mass.
    * * *
    1 (acumularse) to agglomerate, amass
    2 (gente) to crowd
    * * *
    VPR (=juntarse) to agglomerate, form a mass; (=apiñarse) to crowd together
    * * *
    (v.) = crowd, mill around, clump together, be out in force, come out in + force, swarm
    Ex. Titles on alternative medicine are now crowding US bookshelves.
    Ex. The large pod of about 75 narwhals milled around the bay in the summer feeding grounds.
    Ex. From time to time, fluff your comforter up to keep the feathers from clumping together or hang it out on the clothesline for a quick freshen-up.
    Ex. Myanmar's police and military were out in force again on Friday, patrolling the deserted streets.
    Ex. The supporters of Henry George came out in force last night and marched over a route two miles long.
    Ex. Nearby workers rescued a man after he swatted one bee and was swarmed by others that stung him more than 200 times.
    * * *
    (v.) = crowd, mill around, clump together, be out in force, come out in + force, swarm

    Ex: Titles on alternative medicine are now crowding US bookshelves.

    Ex: The large pod of about 75 narwhals milled around the bay in the summer feeding grounds.
    Ex: From time to time, fluff your comforter up to keep the feathers from clumping together or hang it out on the clothesline for a quick freshen-up.
    Ex: Myanmar's police and military were out in force again on Friday, patrolling the deserted streets.
    Ex: The supporters of Henry George came out in force last night and marched over a route two miles long.
    Ex: Nearby workers rescued a man after he swatted one bee and was swarmed by others that stung him more than 200 times.

    * * *

    aglomerarse ( conjugate aglomerarse) verbo pronominal
    to crowd (together)
    ■aglomerarse verbo reflexivo to gather: los niños se aglomeraban en la puerta del colegio, the children congregated around the entrance to the school
    ' aglomerarse' also found in these entries:
    English:
    crowd
    * * *
    vpr
    to mass o gather together
    * * *
    v/r crowd together
    * * *
    vr
    : to crowd together

    Spanish-English dictionary > aglomerarse

  • 5 antes de nada

    first of all
    * * *
    = before long, before + Pronombre + know what + happen, before + Pronombre + know it
    Ex. News of boundless timber reserves spread, and before long lumberjacks from the thinning hardwood forests of New England swarmed into the uncharted area with no other possessions than their axes and brawn and the clothing they wore.
    Ex. She took a shine to Sheldon, and before he knows what has happened, the misanthropic physicist finds himself with a girlfriend.
    Ex. And, before I knew it, she had shoved her whole head in my coffee cup and taken a big slurp of my coffee!.
    * * *
    = before long, before + Pronombre + know what + happen, before + Pronombre + know it

    Ex: News of boundless timber reserves spread, and before long lumberjacks from the thinning hardwood forests of New England swarmed into the uncharted area with no other possessions than their axes and brawn and the clothing they wore.

    Ex: She took a shine to Sheldon, and before he knows what has happened, the misanthropic physicist finds himself with a girlfriend.
    Ex: And, before I knew it, she had shoved her whole head in my coffee cup and taken a big slurp of my coffee!.

    Spanish-English dictionary > antes de nada

  • 6 aplastar de un manotazo

    (v.) = swat
    Ex. Nearby workers rescued a man after he swatted one bee and was swarmed by others that stung him more than 200 times.
    * * *
    (v.) = swat

    Ex: Nearby workers rescued a man after he swatted one bee and was swarmed by others that stung him more than 200 times.

    Spanish-English dictionary > aplastar de un manotazo

  • 7 atacar en grupo

    (v.) = swarm
    Ex. Nearby workers rescued a man after he swatted one bee and was swarmed by others that stung him more than 200 times.
    * * *
    (v.) = swarm

    Ex: Nearby workers rescued a man after he swatted one bee and was swarmed by others that stung him more than 200 times.

    Spanish-English dictionary > atacar en grupo

  • 8 atestado

    adj.
    1 crowded, full-up, chock-a-block, chock-full.
    2 obstinate, stubborn, pigheaded.
    m.
    1 official report.
    2 attestation, constat.
    3 certificate.
    past part.
    past participle of spanish verb: atestar.
    * * *
    1 DERECHO affidavit, statement
    1 testimonials
    ————————
    1→ link=atestar atestar 2
    1 packed (de, with), crammed (de, with)
    * * *
    (f. - atestada)
    adj.
    crowded, packed
    * * *
    I
    SM (Jur) affidavit, statement
    II
    ADJ
    1) (=lleno) packed

    atestado de — packed with, crammed with, full of

    2) (=testarudo) obstinate, stubborn
    * * *
    I
    - da adjetivo packed, crammed

    atestado de algopacked o crammed full of something

    II
    masculino statement, attestation (frml)
    * * *
    = crowded, overcrowded, cluttered, choc-a-block, chock-full, densely packed, packed, packed full.
    Ex. 'Lower town,' along the water's edge, is a district of crowded brick and frame structures of varied heights, an occasional old residence having had its ground floor pressed into commercial service.
    Ex. Cooperative storage of materials on a regional or national basis promises to become the best way of coping with overcrowded libraries.
    Ex. They found him in his habitually cluttered office, buried beneath stacks of paperwork.
    Ex. The library was choc-a-block with celebrities and children as they swarmed to see the signing of the new Harry Potter book by its author.
    Ex. Herbal cancer remedy is chock-full of drugs.
    Ex. The square was humble and nondescript, part of a maze of narrow streets and densely packed shops and houses.
    Ex. Here and there, elderly citizens tend tiny, packed shops selling candy and chipped bottles of cold soda.
    Ex. The days will be packed full, without any filler and without a moment wasted.
    ----
    * atestado (de) = jam-packed (with), filled to capacity.
    * * *
    I
    - da adjetivo packed, crammed

    atestado de algopacked o crammed full of something

    II
    masculino statement, attestation (frml)
    * * *
    atestado(de)
    (adj.) = jam-packed (with), filled to capacity

    Ex: This week is looking to be quite a jam packed, event-filled, extravaganza!.

    Ex: If a class is filled to capacity, please contact the secretary and ask to be put on a waiting list.

    = crowded, overcrowded, cluttered, choc-a-block, chock-full, densely packed, packed, packed full.

    Ex: 'Lower town,' along the water's edge, is a district of crowded brick and frame structures of varied heights, an occasional old residence having had its ground floor pressed into commercial service.

    Ex: Cooperative storage of materials on a regional or national basis promises to become the best way of coping with overcrowded libraries.
    Ex: They found him in his habitually cluttered office, buried beneath stacks of paperwork.
    Ex: The library was choc-a-block with celebrities and children as they swarmed to see the signing of the new Harry Potter book by its author.
    Ex: Herbal cancer remedy is chock-full of drugs.
    Ex: The square was humble and nondescript, part of a maze of narrow streets and densely packed shops and houses.
    Ex: Here and there, elderly citizens tend tiny, packed shops selling candy and chipped bottles of cold soda.
    Ex: The days will be packed full, without any filler and without a moment wasted.
    * atestado (de) = jam-packed (with), filled to capacity.

    * * *
    atestado1 -da
    packed, crammed
    el salón estaba atestado (de gente) the hall was packed o crammed (with people)
    atestado DE algo packed o crammed full OF sth, packed o crammed WITH sth
    tiene cinco o seis cajas atestadas de libros he has five or six boxes crammed o packed full of books, he has five or six boxes crammed o packed with books
    statement, attestation ( frml)
    hacer un atestado to make a statement
    * * *

    atestado
    ◊ -da adjetivo

    packed, crammed;
    atestado de algo packed o crammed full of sth;
    el salón estaba atestado (de gente) the hall was packed o crammed (with people)
    atestado,-a 2 adjetivo packed with, full of
    atestado 1 sustantivo masculino
    1 Jur affidavit, statement
    levantar un atestado, to draw up a report
    2 atestados, testimonials

    ' atestado' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    atestada
    - hormiguero
    English:
    bursting
    - crowded
    - jam-packed
    - jam
    * * *
    atestado, -a
    adj
    packed;
    la discoteca estaba atestada the disco was packed;
    el museo estaba atestado de turistas the museum was packed with tourists;
    mi mesa está atestada de libros my desk is covered in books
    nm
    official report;
    levantar un atestado to write an official report
    * * *
    adj overcrowded
    * * *
    atestado, -da adj
    : crowded, packed

    Spanish-English dictionary > atestado

  • 9 bullir

    v.
    1 to boil.
    El agua bulle alegremente en la olla Water boils merrily in the pot.
    2 to bustle.
    bullir de to seethe with
    la calle bullía de gente the street was swarming with people
    3 to mill, to whirl.
    Las corrientes bullen en el mar Currents mill=whirl in the sea.
    * * *
    Conjugation model [ MULLIR], like link=mullir mullir
    1 (líquido - hervir) to boil; (- agitarse) to bubble up; (mar) to seethe; (calle etc) to swarm with, seethe with
    2 (insectos) to swarm; (gente) to bustle about
    * * *
    verb
    * * *
    1. VI
    1) [agua] (=hervir) to boil; (=agitarse) to bubble (up)
    sangre 2)
    2) (=moverse) to move, stir

    no bullía — he didn't move, he never stirred

    3) [insectos] to swarm
    2.
    VT to move, stir
    3.
    See:
    * * *
    verbo intransitivo

    el lugar bullía de actividadthe place was a hive of activity

    * * *
    Ex. The entire USA has begun to buzz with discusions on making this way of doing business the rule rather than the exception of 21st century life.
    ----
    * bullir de actividad = be a hive of activity.
    * * *
    verbo intransitivo

    el lugar bullía de actividadthe place was a hive of activity

    * * *

    Ex: The entire USA has begun to buzz with discusions on making this way of doing business the rule rather than the exception of 21st century life.

    * bullir de actividad = be a hive of activity.

    * * *
    bullir [I9 ]
    vi
    me bulle la sangre (en las venas) cuando oigo esas cosas it makes my blood boil when I hear things like that
    las ideas bullían en su mente his mind was bubbling (over) with ideas
    el mar bullía embravecido ( liter); the sea seethed furiously ( liter)
    una nube de abejas bullía alrededor del panal a cloud of bees swarmed around the honey comb
    la calle bullía de gente the street was teeming o swarming with people
    el lugar bullía de actividad the place was a hive of activity
    * * *

    bullir ( conjugate bullir) verbo intransitivo:
    la calle bullía de gente the street was teeming o swarming with people;

    el lugar bullía de actividad the place was a hive of activity
    bullir verbo intransitivo
    1 (un líquido) to boil, bubble (up)
    2 (hormiguear) to bustle

    ' bullir' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    pulular
    English:
    seethe
    - bubble
    - bustle
    * * *
    bullir vi
    1. [hervir] to boil;
    [burbujear] to bubble;
    me bulle la sangre cuando veo injusticias así it makes my blood boil to see injustices like that
    2. [multitud] to bustle;
    [ratas, hormigas] to swarm; [mar] to boil;
    la calle bullía de gente the street was swarming with people;
    los pasillos bullían de actividad the corridors were a hive of activity
    3. [surgir] to bubble up;
    le bullían muchas ideas en la cabeza her head was bubbling over with ideas
    * * *
    v/i fig
    1 de sangre boil
    2 de lugar swarm, teem (de with)
    * * *
    bullir {38} vi
    1) hervir: to boil
    2) moverse: to stir, to bustle about

    Spanish-English dictionary > bullir

  • 10 cada vez menor

    (adj.) = decreasing, dwindling, diminishing, thinning, fading, waning, declining, falling, shrinking, receding, sinking, ebbing, descending
    Ex. It is impossible to read the library press today without reading about the increasing costs of maintaining, and the decreasing budgets of libraries, and particularly about the increasing costs of technical services.
    Ex. Squeezed between the upper and nether milestones of increasing demand and dwindling resources, individual librarians develop ways in which to make their jobs easier.
    Ex. It is remarkable how, in an economy with diminishing job opportunities, librarians compensate for their inability to demonstrate the value of their skills by seeking the protection of educational and certification requirements.
    Ex. News of boundless timber reserves spread, and before long lumberjacks from the thinning hardwood forests of New England swarmed into the uncharted area with no other possessions than their axes and brawn and the clothing they wore.
    Ex. With the fading significance of these physical forms, some of the rationale for unit entries has disappeared.
    Ex. This article discusses the impact of growing number of students and waning financial resources on library services and acquisition focusing on book shortages, security problems and inadequacy of staffing.
    Ex. The public library is a complex institution, evolving through many decades of human history and colliding today with the perplexing realities of change, declining funding, and shifting purpose.
    Ex. As well as cuts imposed by the Government, libraries were faced with inflation in the price of books and periodicals, and a falling rate of exchange between the pound and the dollar.
    Ex. Many challenges lie ahead for those selling children's books with increased competition and shrinking profit margins.
    Ex. Poland is currently enjoying a steadily rising national income, declining inflation, receding unemployment and an educational boom.
    Ex. It has not yet been decided what strategies libraries will use to face the crisis of rising personnel costs and sinking funds for book acquisitions.
    Ex. Every publisher, materials vendor, systems vendor and bibliographic utility that serve libraries face sharp competition for a share of the ebbing library market.
    Ex. The second reason is that companies have to take care of costs to meet the descending price rate of the market.
    * * *
    (adj.) = decreasing, dwindling, diminishing, thinning, fading, waning, declining, falling, shrinking, receding, sinking, ebbing, descending

    Ex: It is impossible to read the library press today without reading about the increasing costs of maintaining, and the decreasing budgets of libraries, and particularly about the increasing costs of technical services.

    Ex: Squeezed between the upper and nether milestones of increasing demand and dwindling resources, individual librarians develop ways in which to make their jobs easier.
    Ex: It is remarkable how, in an economy with diminishing job opportunities, librarians compensate for their inability to demonstrate the value of their skills by seeking the protection of educational and certification requirements.
    Ex: News of boundless timber reserves spread, and before long lumberjacks from the thinning hardwood forests of New England swarmed into the uncharted area with no other possessions than their axes and brawn and the clothing they wore.
    Ex: With the fading significance of these physical forms, some of the rationale for unit entries has disappeared.
    Ex: This article discusses the impact of growing number of students and waning financial resources on library services and acquisition focusing on book shortages, security problems and inadequacy of staffing.
    Ex: The public library is a complex institution, evolving through many decades of human history and colliding today with the perplexing realities of change, declining funding, and shifting purpose.
    Ex: As well as cuts imposed by the Government, libraries were faced with inflation in the price of books and periodicals, and a falling rate of exchange between the pound and the dollar.
    Ex: Many challenges lie ahead for those selling children's books with increased competition and shrinking profit margins.
    Ex: Poland is currently enjoying a steadily rising national income, declining inflation, receding unemployment and an educational boom.
    Ex: It has not yet been decided what strategies libraries will use to face the crisis of rising personnel costs and sinking funds for book acquisitions.
    Ex: Every publisher, materials vendor, systems vendor and bibliographic utility that serve libraries face sharp competition for a share of the ebbing library market.
    Ex: The second reason is that companies have to take care of costs to meet the descending price rate of the market.

    Spanish-English dictionary > cada vez menor

  • 11 de bote en bote

    jam-packed
    * * *
    (v.) = packed to capacity, choc-a-block, chock-full, densely packed, packed, packed to the rafters
    Ex. His small foreign-made car strained with the added burden of an interior packed to capacity with personal belongings and a heavily laden U-Haul trailor attached to the rear.
    Ex. The library was choc-a-block with celebrities and children as they swarmed to see the signing of the new Harry Potter book by its author.
    Ex. Herbal cancer remedy is chock-full of drugs.
    Ex. The square was humble and nondescript, part of a maze of narrow streets and densely packed shops and houses.
    Ex. Here and there, elderly citizens tend tiny, packed shops selling candy and chipped bottles of cold soda.
    Ex. The local church was packed to the rafters for the funeral of a much-loved parish priest who died last month aged 69.
    * * *
    (v.) = packed to capacity, choc-a-block, chock-full, densely packed, packed, packed to the rafters

    Ex: His small foreign-made car strained with the added burden of an interior packed to capacity with personal belongings and a heavily laden U-Haul trailor attached to the rear.

    Ex: The library was choc-a-block with celebrities and children as they swarmed to see the signing of the new Harry Potter book by its author.
    Ex: Herbal cancer remedy is chock-full of drugs.
    Ex: The square was humble and nondescript, part of a maze of narrow streets and densely packed shops and houses.
    Ex: Here and there, elderly citizens tend tiny, packed shops selling candy and chipped bottles of cold soda.
    Ex: The local church was packed to the rafters for the funeral of a much-loved parish priest who died last month aged 69.

    Spanish-English dictionary > de bote en bote

  • 12 dentro de poco

    soon, presently
    ————————
    soon, shortly
    * * *
    shortly, soon
    * * *
    Ex. News of boundless timber reserves spread, and before long lumberjacks from the thinning hardwood forests of New England swarmed into the uncharted area with no other possessions than their axes and brawn and the clothing they wore.
    * * *

    Ex: News of boundless timber reserves spread, and before long lumberjacks from the thinning hardwood forests of New England swarmed into the uncharted area with no other possessions than their axes and brawn and the clothing they wore.

    Spanish-English dictionary > dentro de poco

  • 13 desconocido

    adj.
    1 unknown, anonymous, unfamiliar, obscure.
    2 undiscovered, strange, uncharted.
    f. & m.
    stranger, unidentified individual, unknown individual.
    past part.
    past participle of spanish verb: desconocer.
    * * *
    1→ link=desconocer desconocer
    1 (no conocido) unknown
    2 (no reconocido) unrecognized
    3 (extraño) strange, unfamiliar
    nombre masculino,nombre femenino
    1 stranger, unknown person
    1 the unknown
    \
    estar desconocido,-a to be unrecognizable
    * * *
    1. (f. - desconocida)
    noun
    2. (f. - desconocida)
    adj.
    * * *
    desconocido, -a
    1. ADJ
    1) [gen] unknown
    2)

    estar desconocido: con ese traje estás desconocido — I'd hardly recognize you o you're unrecognizable in that suit

    después del divorcio está desconocidohe's a changed person o he's like a different person since the divorce

    2.
    SM / F stranger
    * * *
    I
    - da adjetivo
    a) <hecho/método/sensación> unknown
    b) <artista/atleta> unknown
    c) < persona> ( extraño)
    d) (fam) ( irreconocible)

    ahora hasta plancha, está desconocido — he's like a different man, he even does the ironing

    II
    - da masculino, femenino
    a) ( no conocido) stranger
    * * *
    = stranger, unfamiliar, unheard of, unidentified, unknown, unrecognised [unrecognized, -USA], outsider, uncharted, unchartered, unheard, unnoticed, unnoted, nomen nescio [N.N.].
    Ex. Many Americans viewed this influx of strangers with alarm.
    Ex. We are used to background noise in air conditioned buildings but the introduction of additional and unfamiliar sounds from AV equipment may be disturbing.
    Ex. Hypermedia offers unheard of opportunities to gain insight into the way young people perceive, process and use information.
    Ex. Names of speakers from the audience which were not clear from the tapes are listed as ' unidentified'.
    Ex. Works with unknown or uncertain personal authorship, or works emanating from a body that lacks a name are to be entered under title.
    Ex. It is undeniable that the ripest crop of unrecognised great inventors, long-lost heirs to dormant peerages, and assorted harmless drudges is to be gathered in the great general libraries of our major cities.
    Ex. The library director does not want to take the chance that by allowing the trustees to get active he might lose partial control of the library operation to an 'outsider'.
    Ex. News of boundless timber reserves spread, and before long lumberjacks from the thinning hardwood forests of New England swarmed into the uncharted area with no other possessions than their axes and brawn and the clothing they wore.
    Ex. This author agrees that the facts listed above are unchartered.
    Ex. As professionals are informed about the often unspoken and unheard stories relating to hearing loss, they can then serve with greater knowledge, empathy, and hope.
    Ex. By retrieving and bringing together these two literatures, that implicit unstated, and perhaps unnoticed hypothesis becomes apparent.
    Ex. This approach draws attention to hitherto unnoted relationships among concepts.
    Ex. Nomen nescio, abbreviated to N.N., is used to signify an anonymous or non-specific person.
    ----
    * algo desconocido = virgin territory.
    * de causas desconocidas = idiopathic.
    * desconocido, lo = unfamiliar, the, unknown, the.
    * Dimensión Desconocida = The Twilight Zone.
    * hablar en lengua desconocida = talk in + tongues.
    * líquido desconocido = foreign substance.
    * miedo a lo desconocido = fear of the unknown.
    * miedo hacia lo desconocido = fear of the unknown.
    * moverse en terreno desconocido = be out of + Posesivo + depth, be in over + Posesivo + head.
    * pisar terreno desconocido = be out of + Posesivo + depth, be in over + Posesivo + head.
    * producto desconocido = foreign substance.
    * salto hacia lo desconocido = leap into + the unknown.
    * ser desconocido para = be alien to.
    * ser un desconocido = not know + Pronombre + from Adam.
    * sustancia desconocida = foreign substance.
    * terreno desconocido = unchartered territory, unchartered waters.
    * territorio desconocido = unfamiliar territory, unchartered territory, unchartered waters.
    * * *
    I
    - da adjetivo
    a) <hecho/método/sensación> unknown
    b) <artista/atleta> unknown
    c) < persona> ( extraño)
    d) (fam) ( irreconocible)

    ahora hasta plancha, está desconocido — he's like a different man, he even does the ironing

    II
    - da masculino, femenino
    a) ( no conocido) stranger
    * * *
    = stranger, unfamiliar, unheard of, unidentified, unknown, unrecognised [unrecognized, -USA], outsider, uncharted, unchartered, unheard, unnoticed, unnoted, nomen nescio [N.N.].

    Ex: Many Americans viewed this influx of strangers with alarm.

    Ex: We are used to background noise in air conditioned buildings but the introduction of additional and unfamiliar sounds from AV equipment may be disturbing.
    Ex: Hypermedia offers unheard of opportunities to gain insight into the way young people perceive, process and use information.
    Ex: Names of speakers from the audience which were not clear from the tapes are listed as ' unidentified'.
    Ex: Works with unknown or uncertain personal authorship, or works emanating from a body that lacks a name are to be entered under title.
    Ex: It is undeniable that the ripest crop of unrecognised great inventors, long-lost heirs to dormant peerages, and assorted harmless drudges is to be gathered in the great general libraries of our major cities.
    Ex: The library director does not want to take the chance that by allowing the trustees to get active he might lose partial control of the library operation to an 'outsider'.
    Ex: News of boundless timber reserves spread, and before long lumberjacks from the thinning hardwood forests of New England swarmed into the uncharted area with no other possessions than their axes and brawn and the clothing they wore.
    Ex: This author agrees that the facts listed above are unchartered.
    Ex: As professionals are informed about the often unspoken and unheard stories relating to hearing loss, they can then serve with greater knowledge, empathy, and hope.
    Ex: By retrieving and bringing together these two literatures, that implicit unstated, and perhaps unnoticed hypothesis becomes apparent.
    Ex: This approach draws attention to hitherto unnoted relationships among concepts.
    Ex: Nomen nescio, abbreviated to N.N., is used to signify an anonymous or non-specific person.
    * algo desconocido = virgin territory.
    * de causas desconocidas = idiopathic.
    * desconocido, lo = unfamiliar, the, unknown, the.
    * Dimensión Desconocida = The Twilight Zone.
    * hablar en lengua desconocida = talk in + tongues.
    * líquido desconocido = foreign substance.
    * miedo a lo desconocido = fear of the unknown.
    * miedo hacia lo desconocido = fear of the unknown.
    * moverse en terreno desconocido = be out of + Posesivo + depth, be in over + Posesivo + head.
    * pisar terreno desconocido = be out of + Posesivo + depth, be in over + Posesivo + head.
    * producto desconocido = foreign substance.
    * salto hacia lo desconocido = leap into + the unknown.
    * ser desconocido para = be alien to.
    * ser un desconocido = not know + Pronombre + from Adam.
    * sustancia desconocida = foreign substance.
    * terreno desconocido = unchartered territory, unchartered waters.
    * territorio desconocido = unfamiliar territory, unchartered territory, unchartered waters.

    * * *
    1 ‹razón/hecho› unknown; ‹métodos/sensación› unknown
    por razones desconocidas vendió todo y se fue for some unknown reason he sold up and left
    partió con destino desconocido she set off for an unknown destination
    su rostro no me era del todo desconocido his face wasn't wholly unfamiliar to me
    una sensación de terror hasta entonces desconocida a feeling of terror the like of which I/he had never experienced before
    técnicas hasta ahora desconocidas hitherto unknown techniques
    su obra es prácticamente desconocida en Europa her work is practically unknown in Europe
    de origen desconocido of unknown origin
    lo desconocido siempre lo ha intrigado he has always been fascinated by the unknown
    2 ‹artista/atleta› unknown
    3 ‹persona›
    (extraño): una persona desconocida a stranger
    4 ( fam)
    (irreconocible): con ese peinado nuevo está desconocida she's unrecognizable o totally changed with her new hairstyle
    ahora hasta plancha, está desconocido he's like a different man o he's a changed person, he even does the ironing
    masculine, feminine
    1 (no conocido) stranger
    no hables con desconocidos don't talk to strangers
    2
    (no identificado): fue atacado por unos desconocidos he was attacked by unknown assailants
    un desconocido le asestó una puñalada he was stabbed by an unidentified person o by someone whose identity has not been established
    * * *

     

    Del verbo desconocer: ( conjugate desconocer)

    desconocido es:

    el participio

    Multiple Entries:
    desconocer    
    desconocido
    desconocer ( conjugate desconocer) verbo transitivo
    a) ( no conocer):


    desconocía este hecho I was unaware of this fact


    desconocido
    ◊ -da adjetivo ( en general) unknown;

    un cantante desconocido an unknown singer;
    una persona desconocida a stranger
    ■ sustantivo masculino, femenino ( no conocido) stranger
    desconocer verbo transitivo
    1 (no saber) not to know, to be unaware of
    2 (no reconocer, encontrar muy cambiado) to fail to recognize: ¿tú maquillada?, te desconozco, you with make up?, I can hardly recognize you
    desconocido,-a
    I adjetivo
    1 unknown
    una voz desconocida, an unfamiliar voice
    2 (irreconocible) unrecognizable: estás desconocida, you have changed a lot
    II sustantivo masculino y femenino stranger
    III sustantivo masculino lo desconocido, the unknown

    ' desconocido' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    anónima
    - anónimo
    - desconocida
    - incierta
    - incierto
    - inédita
    - inédito
    - paradero
    - extraño
    - miedo
    - perfecto
    English:
    mate
    - obscure
    - strange
    - stranger
    - undiscovered
    - unfamiliar
    - unknown
    - blind
    - outsider
    - perfect
    * * *
    desconocido, -a
    adj
    1. [no conocido] unknown;
    su cine es del todo desconocido en Europa his movies are totally unknown in Europe;
    elementos químicos entonces desconocidos chemical elements then unknown;
    una enfermedad hasta ahora desconocida a hitherto unknown illness;
    por causas todavía desconocidas for reasons as yet unknown o which are still unknown;
    nació en 1821, de padre desconocido he was born in 1821, and it is not known who his father was;
    el mundo de lo desconocido the world of the unknown;
    2. [extraño]
    no dé su teléfono o dirección a personas desconocidas don't give your telephone number or address to strangers
    3. [sin fama] unknown;
    escritores jóvenes, casi desconocidos young, almost unknown, writers
    4. [muy cambiado]
    estar desconocido to have changed beyond all recognition;
    ¿ya no fumas ni bebes? ¡chico, estás desconocido! you don't smoke or drink any more? well, well, you're a changed man!;
    el viejo bar estaba desconocido the old bar was unrecognizable;
    así, sin gafas, estás desconocido like that, with no glasses, you're unrecognizable
    nm,f
    1. [extraño] stranger;
    hablar con un desconocido to talk to a stranger;
    no le abras la puerta a desconocidos don't open the door to strangers
    2. [persona sin fama] unknown;
    le dieron el premio a un (perfecto) desconocido they gave the prize to a complete unknown
    3. [persona sin identificar] unidentified person;
    un desconocido le disparó un tiro en la cabeza he was shot in the head by an unknown assailant;
    tres desconocidos prendieron fuego a varias tiendas several shops were set on fire by three unidentified persons
    * * *
    I adj unknown
    II m, desconocida f stranger
    * * *
    desconocido, -da adj
    : unknown, unfamiliar
    desconocido, -da n
    extraño: stranger
    * * *
    1. (no conocido) unknown
    2. (extraño) strange / unfamiliar
    desconocido2 n stranger

    Spanish-English dictionary > desconocido

  • 14 en muy poco tiempo

    Ex. News of boundless timber reserves spread, and before long lumberjacks from the thinning hardwood forests of New England swarmed into the uncharted area with no other possessions than their axes and brawn and the clothing they wore.
    * * *

    Ex: News of boundless timber reserves spread, and before long lumberjacks from the thinning hardwood forests of New England swarmed into the uncharted area with no other possessions than their axes and brawn and the clothing they wore.

    Spanish-English dictionary > en muy poco tiempo

  • 15 hasta los topes

    (v.) = packed to capacity, bursting at the seams, choc-a-block, chock-full, overloaded, packed to the rafters
    Ex. His small foreign-made car strained with the added burden of an interior packed to capacity with personal belongings and a heavily laden U-Haul trailor attached to the rear.
    Ex. The library solved the problems of budget cuts, a library building bursting at the seams, and stock ill matched to some of the courses by switching to the use of on-line search services.
    Ex. The library was choc-a-block with celebrities and children as they swarmed to see the signing of the new Harry Potter book by its author.
    Ex. Herbal cancer remedy is chock-full of drugs.
    Ex. He dismissed the image of overloaded libraries collapsing under the weight of a surfeit of paper as 'mythology'.
    Ex. The local church was packed to the rafters for the funeral of a much-loved parish priest who died last month aged 69.
    * * *
    (v.) = packed to capacity, bursting at the seams, choc-a-block, chock-full, overloaded, packed to the rafters

    Ex: His small foreign-made car strained with the added burden of an interior packed to capacity with personal belongings and a heavily laden U-Haul trailor attached to the rear.

    Ex: The library solved the problems of budget cuts, a library building bursting at the seams, and stock ill matched to some of the courses by switching to the use of on-line search services.
    Ex: The library was choc-a-block with celebrities and children as they swarmed to see the signing of the new Harry Potter book by its author.
    Ex: Herbal cancer remedy is chock-full of drugs.
    Ex: He dismissed the image of overloaded libraries collapsing under the weight of a surfeit of paper as 'mythology'.
    Ex: The local church was packed to the rafters for the funeral of a much-loved parish priest who died last month aged 69.

    Spanish-English dictionary > hasta los topes

  • 16 ilimitado

    adj.
    unlimited, immeasurable, boundless, infinite.
    * * *
    1 unlimited
    * * *
    ADJ unlimited, limitless
    * * *
    - da adjetivo unlimited
    * * *
    = limitless, unbounded, unrestricted, illimitable, unlimited, boundless, bottomless, open-ended, endless.
    Ex. We are thus concerned with a virtually limitless number of concepts - building, book, reading, colour, sea, water, summer, England, 1066 AD - any concepts you like.
    Ex. The public library is a way of escape from the narrow area of our individual lives into the field, finite, no doubt, but unbounded, of the wisdom and experience of all mankind.
    Ex. Although the library community advocates unrestricted access to resources for all, professional practices illustrate that librarians restrict access for youth.
    Ex. For a century we have been repeating inanities and keeping up this timid, non-committal retreat from society, but if we think of ourselves as communicating librarians we may see our inescapable involvement within the confines (but the illimitable confines) of our profession.
    Ex. Distribution of this memo is unlimited.
    Ex. News of boundless timber reserves spread, and before long lumberjacks from the thinning hardwood forests of New England swarmed into the uncharted area with no other possessions than their axes and brawn and the clothing they wore.
    Ex. The novel is a bottomless quagmire of melodramatic weirdness.
    Ex. New systems incorporating such resources will produce an information environment that is dynamic and open-ended.
    Ex. The list of changed headings is almost literally endless if you have the patience to dig them all up.
    ----
    * ser ilimitado = be boundless.
    * * *
    - da adjetivo unlimited
    * * *
    = limitless, unbounded, unrestricted, illimitable, unlimited, boundless, bottomless, open-ended, endless.

    Ex: We are thus concerned with a virtually limitless number of concepts - building, book, reading, colour, sea, water, summer, England, 1066 AD - any concepts you like.

    Ex: The public library is a way of escape from the narrow area of our individual lives into the field, finite, no doubt, but unbounded, of the wisdom and experience of all mankind.
    Ex: Although the library community advocates unrestricted access to resources for all, professional practices illustrate that librarians restrict access for youth.
    Ex: For a century we have been repeating inanities and keeping up this timid, non-committal retreat from society, but if we think of ourselves as communicating librarians we may see our inescapable involvement within the confines (but the illimitable confines) of our profession.
    Ex: Distribution of this memo is unlimited.
    Ex: News of boundless timber reserves spread, and before long lumberjacks from the thinning hardwood forests of New England swarmed into the uncharted area with no other possessions than their axes and brawn and the clothing they wore.
    Ex: The novel is a bottomless quagmire of melodramatic weirdness.
    Ex: New systems incorporating such resources will produce an information environment that is dynamic and open-ended.
    Ex: The list of changed headings is almost literally endless if you have the patience to dig them all up.
    * ser ilimitado = be boundless.

    * * *
    unlimited
    * * *

    ilimitado
    ◊ -da adjetivo

    unlimited
    ilimitado,-a adjetivo unlimited, limitless

    ' ilimitado' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    ilimitada
    - indefinido
    English:
    boundless
    - limitless
    - unlimited
    - unrestricted
    * * *
    ilimitado, -a adj
    unlimited, limitless;
    poder ilimitado absolute power
    * * *
    adj unlimited
    * * *
    ilimitado, -da adj
    : unlimited

    Spanish-English dictionary > ilimitado

  • 17 inexplorado

    adj.
    unexplored.
    * * *
    1 unexplored
    * * *
    ADJ [terreno, campo, tema] unexplored; [ruta] uncharted
    * * *
    - da adjetivo unexplored
    * * *
    = uncharted, unchartered.
    Nota: Es recomendable usar en su lugar con este mismo significado " uncharted".
    Ex. News of boundless timber reserves spread, and before long lumberjacks from the thinning hardwood forests of New England swarmed into the uncharted area with no other possessions than their axes and brawn and the clothing they wore.
    Ex. This author agrees that the facts listed above are unchartered.
    * * *
    - da adjetivo unexplored
    * * *
    = uncharted, unchartered.
    Nota: Es recomendable usar en su lugar con este mismo significado " uncharted".

    Ex: News of boundless timber reserves spread, and before long lumberjacks from the thinning hardwood forests of New England swarmed into the uncharted area with no other possessions than their axes and brawn and the clothing they wore.

    Ex: This author agrees that the facts listed above are unchartered.

    * * *
    unexplored
    * * *

    inexplorado,-a adjetivo unexplored
    ' inexplorado' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    inexplorada
    English:
    unexplored
    * * *
    inexplorado, -a adj
    unexplored
    * * *
    adj unexplored
    * * *
    inexplorado, -da adj
    : unexplored

    Spanish-English dictionary > inexplorado

  • 18 irrumpir en

    v.
    1 to barge into, to barge in on, to break in on, to break in upon.
    María irrumpió en la habitación Mary barged into the room.
    María irrumpió en la conversación Mary barged into the conversation.
    2 to barge into, to barrel into, to bulldoze into, to burst into.
    María irrumpió en la habitación Mary barged into the room.
    * * *
    (v.) = swarm (into/in), burst into, storm into
    Ex. News of boundless timber reserves spread, and before long lumberjacks from the thinning hardwood forests of New England swarmed into the uncharted area with no other possessions than their axes and brawn and the clothing they wore.
    Ex. In a minute, James burst into the room in her usual emphatic way, threw her briefcase on the desk, and said: 'Hi!'.
    Ex. A Serbian man who stormed into the Serbian presidential building with two hand grenades was disarmed by the police after a five-hour standoff.
    * * *
    (v.) = swarm (into/in), burst into, storm into

    Ex: News of boundless timber reserves spread, and before long lumberjacks from the thinning hardwood forests of New England swarmed into the uncharted area with no other possessions than their axes and brawn and the clothing they wore.

    Ex: In a minute, James burst into the room in her usual emphatic way, threw her briefcase on the desk, and said: 'Hi!'.
    Ex: A Serbian man who stormed into the Serbian presidential building with two hand grenades was disarmed by the police after a five-hour standoff.

    Spanish-English dictionary > irrumpir en

  • 19 leñador

    m.
    woodcutter, logger, lumberjack, timberman.
    * * *
    nombre masculino,nombre femenino
    1 woodcutter, lumberjack
    * * *
    leñador, -a
    SM / F woodcutter, logger
    * * *
    - dora masculino, femenino woodcutter
    * * *
    = lumberman [lumbermen, -pl.], woodman [woodmen, -pl.], lumberjack.
    Ex. And when, finally, the heavily timbered ranges had been pillaged almost beyond repair, many lumbermen pulled stakes and pushed westward.
    Ex. Soon the hills began to echo with the thud of the woodsman's axe and a sawmill was erected.
    Ex. News of boundless timber reserves spread, and before long lumberjacks from the thinning hardwood forests of New England swarmed into the uncharted area with no other possessions than their axes and brawn and the clothing they wore.
    * * *
    - dora masculino, femenino woodcutter
    * * *
    = lumberman [lumbermen, -pl.], woodman [woodmen, -pl.], lumberjack.

    Ex: And when, finally, the heavily timbered ranges had been pillaged almost beyond repair, many lumbermen pulled stakes and pushed westward.

    Ex: Soon the hills began to echo with the thud of the woodsman's axe and a sawmill was erected.
    Ex: News of boundless timber reserves spread, and before long lumberjacks from the thinning hardwood forests of New England swarmed into the uncharted area with no other possessions than their axes and brawn and the clothing they wore.

    * * *
    masculine, feminine
    woodcutter
    * * *

    leñador
    ◊ - dora sustantivo masculino, femenino

    woodcutter
    leñador,-ora sustantivo masculino y femenino woodcutter

    ' leñador' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    hacha
    - leñadora
    English:
    logger
    - lumberjack
    - woodcutter
    - lumber
    * * *
    leñador, -ora nm,f
    woodcutter
    * * *
    m woodcutter
    * * *
    : lumberjack, woodcutter

    Spanish-English dictionary > leñador

  • 20 llevar ropa puesta

    (v.) = wear + clothing
    Ex. News of boundless timber reserves spread, and before long lumberjacks from the thinning hardwood forests of New England swarmed into the uncharted area with no other possessions than their axes and brawn and the clothing they wore.
    * * *
    (v.) = wear + clothing

    Ex: News of boundless timber reserves spread, and before long lumberjacks from the thinning hardwood forests of New England swarmed into the uncharted area with no other possessions than their axes and brawn and the clothing they wore.

    Spanish-English dictionary > llevar ropa puesta

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