Translation: from spanish

scaling back

  • 1 brusco

    adj.
    1 sudden, abrupt.
    2 snappish, gruff, rude, blunt.
    * * *
    1 (repentino) sudden
    2 (persona) brusque, abrupt
    * * *
    (f. - brusca)
    adj.
    1) sudden, abrupt
    2) brusque, rough
    * * *
    1. ADJ
    1) (=repentino) [descenso, curva, declive] sharp; [movimiento] sudden; [cambio] abrupt, sudden
    2) (=grosero) [actitud, porte] curt, brusque; [comentario] rude
    2.
    SM (Bot) butcher's broom
    * * *
    - ca adjetivo
    a) <movimiento/cambio> abrupt, sudden; <subida/descenso> sharp, sudden, abrupt
    b) <carácter/modales> rough; <tono/gesto> brusque, abrupt; < respuesta> curt, brusque
    * * *
    = abrasive, abrupt, curt, gruff, blunt, short, short-tempered, off-hand [offhand].
    Ex. She wanted to say: 'You are a conceited, obstinate, inflexible, manipulative, pompous, close-minded, insensitive, abrasive, opinionated, platitudinous oaf!'.
    Ex. There were abrupt fluctuations in his output from one week to the next.
    Ex. The young man pointed to him and said in a sharp, curt tone: 'Let me see your briefcase'.
    Ex. She is a controversial figure, and has a reputation for being direct and gruff.
    Ex. The author discusses the range of enquiries he deals with, the sources of information he uses, and the blunt attitude with which he deals with many enquirers.
    Ex. He first spotted trouble when she started being short with users and so he solved the problem by scaling back her workload.
    Ex. A medical doctor had told him that the reason why women have faster pulse beats is because they are short-tempered.
    Ex. The osteopath was accused of being off-hand with a female patient and not putting her at ease.
    ----
    * brusca y repentinamente = summarily.
    * cambio brusco = flip-flop.
    * cambio brusco de velocidad del viento = wind shear.
    * * *
    - ca adjetivo
    a) <movimiento/cambio> abrupt, sudden; <subida/descenso> sharp, sudden, abrupt
    b) <carácter/modales> rough; <tono/gesto> brusque, abrupt; < respuesta> curt, brusque
    * * *
    = abrasive, abrupt, curt, gruff, blunt, short, short-tempered, off-hand [offhand].

    Ex: She wanted to say: 'You are a conceited, obstinate, inflexible, manipulative, pompous, close-minded, insensitive, abrasive, opinionated, platitudinous oaf!'.

    Ex: There were abrupt fluctuations in his output from one week to the next.
    Ex: The young man pointed to him and said in a sharp, curt tone: 'Let me see your briefcase'.
    Ex: She is a controversial figure, and has a reputation for being direct and gruff.
    Ex: The author discusses the range of enquiries he deals with, the sources of information he uses, and the blunt attitude with which he deals with many enquirers.
    Ex: He first spotted trouble when she started being short with users and so he solved the problem by scaling back her workload.
    Ex: A medical doctor had told him that the reason why women have faster pulse beats is because they are short-tempered.
    Ex: The osteopath was accused of being off-hand with a female patient and not putting her at ease.
    * brusca y repentinamente = summarily.
    * cambio brusco = flip-flop.
    * cambio brusco de velocidad del viento = wind shear.

    * * *
    brusco -ca
    1 ‹movimiento/cambio› abrupt, sudden; ‹subida/descenso/viraje› sharp, sudden, abrupt
    el brusco giro de los acontecimientos the sudden turn of events
    se deben evitar las frenadas bruscas you should avoid braking suddenly o sharply
    2 ‹carácter/modales› rough; ‹tono/gesto› brusque, abrupt; ‹respuesta› curt, brusque
    no seas tan brusco que lo vas a romper don't be so rough or you'll break it
    * * *

    brusco
    ◊ -ca adjetivo

    a)movimiento/cambio abrupt, sudden;

    subida/descenso sharp, sudden
    b)carácter/modales rough;

    tono/gesto brusque, abrupt;
    respuesta curt, brusque
    brusco,-a adjetivo
    1 (rudo, poco amable) brusque, abrupt
    2 (súbito) sudden, sharp
    ' brusco' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    brusca
    - dura
    - duro
    - sacudida
    - tajante
    - viraje
    - bestia
    - bruto
    - explosión
    English:
    abrupt
    - blunt
    - brusque
    - curt
    - dramatic
    - gruff
    - jerk
    - offhand
    - rough
    - rough-and-tumble
    - sharp
    - short
    - sudden
    - swerve
    - switch
    - unceremonious
    - snappy
    - steep
    - toss
    * * *
    brusco, -a
    adj
    1. [repentino, imprevisto] sudden, abrupt;
    un cambio brusco de las temperaturas a sudden change in temperature;
    dio un frenazo brusco she braked sharply
    2. [tosco, grosero] brusque;
    me contestó de forma brusca he answered me brusquely
    nm,f
    brusque person
    * * *
    adj
    1 cambio abrupt, sudden
    2 respuesta, persona brusque, curt
    * * *
    brusco, -ca adj
    1) súbito: sudden, abrupt
    2) : curt, brusque
    bruscamente adv
    * * *
    brusco adj
    1. (repetino) sudden
    2. (persona) abrupt

    Spanish-English dictionary > brusco

  • 2 detectar un problema

    (v.) = spot + problem, spot + trouble
    Ex. By spotting problems in the system early, you can 'nip them in the bud'.
    Ex. He first spotted trouble when she started being short with users and so he solved the problem by scaling back her workload.
    * * *
    (v.) = spot + problem, spot + trouble

    Ex: By spotting problems in the system early, you can 'nip them in the bud'.

    Ex: He first spotted trouble when she started being short with users and so he solved the problem by scaling back her workload.

    Spanish-English dictionary > detectar un problema

  • 3 disminuir

    v.
    1 to reduce.
    2 to decrease.
    El medicamento disminuyó la fiebre The drug decreased the fever.
    Me disminuyó la temperatura My temperature decreased.
    3 to diminish, to decrease, to fall off, to drop off.
    El calor disminuyó The heat diminished.
    4 to lessen, to take down, to humiliate, to deflate.
    Su actitud disminuyó a su hijo His attitude lessened his son.
    5 to have less.
    Te disminuyó la fiebre You have less fever.
    * * *
    Conjugation model [ HUIR], like link=huir huir
    1 (gen) to decrease
    2 (medidas, velocidad) to reduce
    1 (gen) to diminish
    2 (temperatura, precios) to drop, fall
    * * *
    verb
    2) drop, fall
    * * *
    1. VT
    1) (=reducir) [+ nivel, precio, gastos, intereses] to reduce, bring down; [+ riesgo, incidencia, dolor] to reduce, lessen; [+ temperatura] to lower, bring down; [+ prestigio, autoridad] to diminish, lessen; [+ fuerzas] to sap; [+ entusiasmo] to dampen

    algunos bancos han disminuido en un 0,15% sus tipos de interés — some banks have reduced o brought down their interest rates by 0.15%

    disminuyó la velocidad para tomar la curvashe slowed down o reduced her speed to go round the bend

    2) (Cos) [+ puntos] to decrease
    2. VI
    1) (=decrecer) [número, población] to decrease, drop, fall; [temperatura, precios] to drop, fall; [distancia, diferencia, velocidad, tensión] to decrease; [fuerzas, autoridad, poder] to diminish; [días] to grow shorter; [luz] to fade; [prestigio, entusiasmo] to dwindle

    el paro disminuyó en un 0,3% — unemployment dropped o fell by 0.3%

    2) (=empeorar) [memoria, vista] to fail
    3) (Cos) [puntos] to decrease
    * * *
    1.
    verbo intransitivo
    1) ( menguar) número/cantidad to decrease, drop, fall; entusiasmo/interés to wane, diminish; precios/temperaturas to drop, fall; poder/fama to diminish; dolor to diminish, lessen
    2) ( al tejer) to decrease
    2.
    1) ( reducir) <gastos/costos/impuestos> to reduce, cut; < velocidad> to reduce; <número/cantidad> to reduce, diminish
    2) ( al tejer) < puntos> to decrease
    * * *
    = decline, decrease, diminish, dwindle, fall off, reduce, relax, shrink, slow down, tail off, lower, dip, subside, mitigate, lessen, abate, decelerate, regress, wane, take + a dive, ebb, slacken, whittle (away/down/at), slow up, taper, scale back, remit, take + a dip, turn down.
    Ex. Library use declines during the June-October period when examinations have finished and the students are on vacation.
    Ex. Recall is inversely proportional to precision, and vice versa, or in other words, as one increases, the other must decrease.
    Ex. While another colleague of mine offered the wry comment that 'as the computer's capabilities have increased our expectations of what it can do have proportionally diminished'.
    Ex. Whereas this proportion is dwindling as a percentage of the total budget, agricultural spending continues to rise in real terms.
    Ex. When the recording procedures were removed study time fell off immediately.
    Ex. The disadvantage of inversion of words is that inversion or indirect word order reduces predictability of form of headings.
    Ex. Since the Federal Government has not been willing to relax import restrictions on books, academic librarians have had to devise a number of strategies for the survival of collection development.
    Ex. The 'false hit' problem still arises, but becomes less likely as the 'neighborhood' of the two words shrinks.
    Ex. However, the flight from DC appears to have slowed down more quickly than was anticipated, and we no longer read of large numbers of libraries making the change.
    Ex. In this unsettled atmosphere, it is not surprising that enthusiasm for membership of the Community should tail off.
    Ex. When a forme was in place on the press stone, paper was lowered on to it by means of a tympan and frisket.
    Ex. The proportions of books bought for children have been extraordinarily steady for four of the five years, only dipping at all appreciably in the last year of 1979-80.
    Ex. Her agitation subsided suddenly.
    Ex. Confusion caused by repetition of descriptive information in access points can be mitigated by careful screen design.
    Ex. Two possible solutions are possible: (1) to lessen the frequency of production, or (2) to reduce the amount of detail in the entries.
    Ex. As the sobbing abated, the secretary's voice regained some steadiness.
    Ex. Accumulation of new data bases is decelerating rapidly with the focus on deriving subsets from current files to serve niche markets.
    Ex. Interloans have regressed recently, despite the rapid advancement of the computer age.
    Ex. The population waxed again slightly, then waned again, until it finally stabilized around its present 55,000.
    Ex. The article 'Wages, hours, bookfunds take a dive' examines how some authorities are proposing cuts in wages to preserve services; others reducing bookfunds by as much as a quarter, or cutting their opening hours in half.
    Ex. Subsequently, library development stalled as cultural interaction ebbed from classical levels.
    Ex. The trend direct supply of books to schools shows no sign of slackening.
    Ex. However, such idealism is often whittled away over time by bureaucratic problems & organizational demands.
    Ex. Since cataloging is the most time consuming part of digitization, it has slowed up the placement of files.
    Ex. The tube in the two types tapers almost unnoticeably from base to tip.
    Ex. He first spotted trouble when she started being short with users and so he solved the problem by scaling back her workload.
    Ex. The fever was resolved and the skin lesions started to remit during the following 3 weeks.
    Ex. Sales took a dip in 2005 but exploded in 2006.
    Ex. Cytokines are small proteins used to communicate messages between the immune cells in the immune system to either turn up or down the immune response.
    ----
    * atención + disminuir = attention + wane.
    * disminuir casi hasta su desaparación = drop to + near vanishing point.
    * disminuir de tamaño = dwindle in + size.
    * disminuir el riesgo = reduce + risk.
    * disminuir el valor de = belittle.
    * disminuir la importancia de = lessen + the importance of.
    * disminuir la marcha = slow down.
    * disminuir la posibilidad = lessen + possibility.
    * disminuir la probabilidad = reduce + chances.
    * disminuir las probabilidades = lengthen + the odds.
    * disminuir la velocidad = slow up.
    * sin disminuir = non-decreasing, unabated.
    * * *
    1.
    verbo intransitivo
    1) ( menguar) número/cantidad to decrease, drop, fall; entusiasmo/interés to wane, diminish; precios/temperaturas to drop, fall; poder/fama to diminish; dolor to diminish, lessen
    2) ( al tejer) to decrease
    2.
    1) ( reducir) <gastos/costos/impuestos> to reduce, cut; < velocidad> to reduce; <número/cantidad> to reduce, diminish
    2) ( al tejer) < puntos> to decrease
    * * *
    = decline, decrease, diminish, dwindle, fall off, reduce, relax, shrink, slow down, tail off, lower, dip, subside, mitigate, lessen, abate, decelerate, regress, wane, take + a dive, ebb, slacken, whittle (away/down/at), slow up, taper, scale back, remit, take + a dip, turn down.

    Ex: Library use declines during the June-October period when examinations have finished and the students are on vacation.

    Ex: Recall is inversely proportional to precision, and vice versa, or in other words, as one increases, the other must decrease.
    Ex: While another colleague of mine offered the wry comment that 'as the computer's capabilities have increased our expectations of what it can do have proportionally diminished'.
    Ex: Whereas this proportion is dwindling as a percentage of the total budget, agricultural spending continues to rise in real terms.
    Ex: When the recording procedures were removed study time fell off immediately.
    Ex: The disadvantage of inversion of words is that inversion or indirect word order reduces predictability of form of headings.
    Ex: Since the Federal Government has not been willing to relax import restrictions on books, academic librarians have had to devise a number of strategies for the survival of collection development.
    Ex: The 'false hit' problem still arises, but becomes less likely as the 'neighborhood' of the two words shrinks.
    Ex: However, the flight from DC appears to have slowed down more quickly than was anticipated, and we no longer read of large numbers of libraries making the change.
    Ex: In this unsettled atmosphere, it is not surprising that enthusiasm for membership of the Community should tail off.
    Ex: When a forme was in place on the press stone, paper was lowered on to it by means of a tympan and frisket.
    Ex: The proportions of books bought for children have been extraordinarily steady for four of the five years, only dipping at all appreciably in the last year of 1979-80.
    Ex: Her agitation subsided suddenly.
    Ex: Confusion caused by repetition of descriptive information in access points can be mitigated by careful screen design.
    Ex: Two possible solutions are possible: (1) to lessen the frequency of production, or (2) to reduce the amount of detail in the entries.
    Ex: As the sobbing abated, the secretary's voice regained some steadiness.
    Ex: Accumulation of new data bases is decelerating rapidly with the focus on deriving subsets from current files to serve niche markets.
    Ex: Interloans have regressed recently, despite the rapid advancement of the computer age.
    Ex: The population waxed again slightly, then waned again, until it finally stabilized around its present 55,000.
    Ex: The article 'Wages, hours, bookfunds take a dive' examines how some authorities are proposing cuts in wages to preserve services; others reducing bookfunds by as much as a quarter, or cutting their opening hours in half.
    Ex: Subsequently, library development stalled as cultural interaction ebbed from classical levels.
    Ex: The trend direct supply of books to schools shows no sign of slackening.
    Ex: However, such idealism is often whittled away over time by bureaucratic problems & organizational demands.
    Ex: Since cataloging is the most time consuming part of digitization, it has slowed up the placement of files.
    Ex: The tube in the two types tapers almost unnoticeably from base to tip.
    Ex: He first spotted trouble when she started being short with users and so he solved the problem by scaling back her workload.
    Ex: The fever was resolved and the skin lesions started to remit during the following 3 weeks.
    Ex: Sales took a dip in 2005 but exploded in 2006.
    Ex: Cytokines are small proteins used to communicate messages between the immune cells in the immune system to either turn up or down the immune response.
    * atención + disminuir = attention + wane.
    * disminuir casi hasta su desaparación = drop to + near vanishing point.
    * disminuir de tamaño = dwindle in + size.
    * disminuir el riesgo = reduce + risk.
    * disminuir el valor de = belittle.
    * disminuir la importancia de = lessen + the importance of.
    * disminuir la marcha = slow down.
    * disminuir la posibilidad = lessen + possibility.
    * disminuir la probabilidad = reduce + chances.
    * disminuir las probabilidades = lengthen + the odds.
    * disminuir la velocidad = slow up.
    * sin disminuir = non-decreasing, unabated.

    * * *
    vi
    A (menguar) «número/cantidad» to decrease, drop, fall; «desempleo/exportaciones/gastos» to decrease, drop, fall; «entusiasmo» to wane, diminish; «interés» to wane, diminish, fall off
    el número de fumadores ha disminuido the number of smokers has dropped o fallen o decreased
    los impuestos no disminuyeron there was no decrease o cut in taxes
    los casos de malaria han disminuido there has been a drop o fall o decrease in the number of malaria cases
    disminuyó la intensidad del viento the wind died down o dropped
    la agilidad disminuye con los años one becomes less agile with age
    B (al tejer) to decrease
    ■ disminuir
    vt
    A (reducir) ‹gastos/costos› to reduce, bring down, cut
    disminuimos la velocidad we reduced speed
    es un asunto muy grave y se intenta disminuir su importancia it is a very serious matter, and its importance is being played down
    el alcohol disminuye la rapidez de los reflejos alcohol slows down your reactions
    B (al tejer) ‹puntos› to decrease
    * * *

     

    disminuir ( conjugate disminuir) verbo intransitivo ( menguar) [número/cantidad] to decrease, fall;
    [precios/temperaturas] to drop, fall;
    [ dolor] to diminish, lessen
    verbo transitivo ( reducir) ‹gastos/producción to cut back on;
    impuestos to cut;
    velocidad/número/cantidad to reduce
    disminuir
    I verbo transitivo to reduce: esto disminuye sus probabilidades de entrar en la Universidad, this lowers his chances of admission to the University
    II verbo intransitivo to diminish: el calor ha disminuido, the heat has lessened
    ' disminuir' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    aclararse
    - atenuar
    - bajar
    - descender
    - enfriar
    - perder
    - rebajar
    - reducir
    - reducirse
    - velocidad
    English:
    cut back
    - decline
    - decrease
    - die down
    - diminish
    - drop
    - dwindle
    - ease off
    - ease up
    - lessen
    - lower
    - odds
    - reduce
    - shrink
    - sink
    - slacken
    - slacken off
    - taper off
    - thin out
    - abate
    - ease
    - flag
    - go
    - let
    - tail
    - taper
    - wane
    * * *
    vt
    to reduce, to decrease;
    disminuye la velocidad al entrar en la curva reduce speed as you go into the curve;
    pastillas que disminuyen el sueño tablets that prevent drowsiness;
    la lesión no ha disminuido su habilidad con el balón the injury hasn't affected his skill with the ball
    vi
    [cantidad, velocidad, intensidad, contaminación] to decrease, to decline; [desempleo, inflación] to decrease, to fall; [precios, temperatura] to fall, to go down; [vista, memoria] to fail; [interés] to decline, to wane;
    no disminuye la euforia inversora investor enthusiasm continues unabated
    * * *
    I v/t gastos, costos reduce, cut; velocidad reduce
    II v/i decrease, diminish
    * * *
    disminuir {41} vt
    reducir: to reduce, to decrease, to lower
    1) : to lower
    2) : to drop, to fall
    * * *
    1. (reducir) to reduce
    2. (bajar, menguar) to fall [pt. fell; pp. fallen] / to drop [pt. & pp. dropped]

    Spanish-English dictionary > disminuir

  • 4 grosero

    adj.
    rude, impolite, coarse, discourteous.
    m.
    rough person, rough, rough and disorderly person, rude.
    * * *
    1 (tosco) coarse, crude
    nombre masculino,nombre femenino
    1 rude person
    * * *
    (f. - grosera)
    adj.
    2) rude
    * * *
    ADJ (=descortés) rude; (=ordinario) coarse, vulgar; (=tosco) rough, loutish; (=indecente) indelicate
    * * *
    I
    - ra adjetivo
    a) ( descortés) <persona/comportamiento> rude, ill-mannered; < lenguaje> rude
    b) ( vulgar) crude
    II
    - ra masculino, femenino

    es un grosero — ( vulgar) he's so vulgar o crude!; ( descortés) he's so rude!

    * * *
    = rude [ruder -comp., rudest -sup.], churlish, abusive, vulgar, uncouth, coarse [coarser -comp.; coarsest -sup.], gross [grosser -comp., grossest -sup.], churl, boorish, short, short-tempered, off-hand [offhand], tasteless, crass [crasser -comp., crassest -sup.].
    Ex. 'That young man was terribly rude'.
    Ex. 'He's slipping back into a churlish mood', the director said averting his eyes.
    Ex. Reference supervisors have a responsibility to protect their staff as well as other library users from the unpleasant, abusive behavior of some persons.
    Ex. This paper is a somewhat whimsical glance backwards, recalling 6 vulgar American parodies of 7 enduring songs.
    Ex. All the writers chosen characterized eastern Europe throughout the 18th century as uncouth and backward.
    Ex. The sections of a book were stapled to a coarse cloth backing, but unfortunately the staples soon rusted and became brittle.
    Ex. Janell has always had a soft spot in her heart for animals most people might find gross.
    Ex. Then again, who but a churl could fail to grieve at the waste of an artistic life of such immensity and grandeur?.
    Ex. He says he dislikes Rose way more because she is a big mouth, intolerant, boorish, know-it-all and always talking about her gay life.
    Ex. He first spotted trouble when she started being short with users and so he solved the problem by scaling back her workload.
    Ex. A medical doctor had told him that the reason why women have faster pulse beats is because they are short-tempered.
    Ex. The osteopath was accused of being off-hand with a female patient and not putting her at ease.
    Ex. Of the hundreds of figurines currently on the market, here are the most bizarrely tasteless.
    Ex. In these new book, he is still at bay, pursued by the hounds of desire and anxiety in a literary world ever more crass.
    ----
    * ser grosero con = be abusive of.
    * * *
    I
    - ra adjetivo
    a) ( descortés) <persona/comportamiento> rude, ill-mannered; < lenguaje> rude
    b) ( vulgar) crude
    II
    - ra masculino, femenino

    es un grosero — ( vulgar) he's so vulgar o crude!; ( descortés) he's so rude!

    * * *
    = rude [ruder -comp., rudest -sup.], churlish, abusive, vulgar, uncouth, coarse [coarser -comp.; coarsest -sup.], gross [grosser -comp., grossest -sup.], churl, boorish, short, short-tempered, off-hand [offhand], tasteless, crass [crasser -comp., crassest -sup.].

    Ex: 'That young man was terribly rude'.

    Ex: 'He's slipping back into a churlish mood', the director said averting his eyes.
    Ex: Reference supervisors have a responsibility to protect their staff as well as other library users from the unpleasant, abusive behavior of some persons.
    Ex: This paper is a somewhat whimsical glance backwards, recalling 6 vulgar American parodies of 7 enduring songs.
    Ex: All the writers chosen characterized eastern Europe throughout the 18th century as uncouth and backward.
    Ex: The sections of a book were stapled to a coarse cloth backing, but unfortunately the staples soon rusted and became brittle.
    Ex: Janell has always had a soft spot in her heart for animals most people might find gross.
    Ex: Then again, who but a churl could fail to grieve at the waste of an artistic life of such immensity and grandeur?.
    Ex: He says he dislikes Rose way more because she is a big mouth, intolerant, boorish, know-it-all and always talking about her gay life.
    Ex: He first spotted trouble when she started being short with users and so he solved the problem by scaling back her workload.
    Ex: A medical doctor had told him that the reason why women have faster pulse beats is because they are short-tempered.
    Ex: The osteopath was accused of being off-hand with a female patient and not putting her at ease.
    Ex: Of the hundreds of figurines currently on the market, here are the most bizarrely tasteless.
    Ex: In these new book, he is still at bay, pursued by the hounds of desire and anxiety in a literary world ever more crass.
    * ser grosero con = be abusive of.

    * * *
    grosero1 -ra
    1 (descortés) ‹persona/comportamiento› rude, ill-mannered; ‹lenguaje› rude
    2 (vulgar) crude, vulgar, coarse
    grosero2 -ra
    masculine, feminine
    es un grosero (vulgar) he's so vulgar o crude o coarse!; (descortés) he's so rude!
    * * *

     

    grosero
    ◊ -ra adjetivo

    a) ( descortés) ‹persona/lenguaje rude


    ■ sustantivo masculino, femenino:
    es un grosero ( vulgar) he's so vulgar o crude!;


    ( descortés) he's so rude!
    grosero,-a
    I adjetivo
    1 (tosco, de baja calidad) coarse
    2 (ofensivo, desagradable) rude
    II sustantivo masculino y femenino es un grosero, he's very rude
    ' grosero' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    basta
    - basto
    - bruta
    - bruto
    - conmigo
    - grosera
    - ordinaria
    - ordinario
    - primitiva
    - primitivo
    - tono
    - animal
    - bestia
    - gamberro
    - gesto
    - guarango
    - ordinariez
    - patán
    - pelado
    English:
    boor
    - boorish
    - coarse
    - crude
    - earthy
    - foul
    - rude
    - throw out
    - uncouth
    - apologize
    - downright
    - dream
    - how
    - just
    - so
    - vulgar
    * * *
    grosero, -a
    adj
    1. [maleducado] rude, crude
    2. [tosco] coarse, rough
    3. [malhablado] foul-mouthed
    nm,f
    rude person;
    es un grosero he's terribly rude
    * * *
    I adj rude
    II m, grosera f rude person
    * * *
    grosero, -ra adj
    1) : rude, fresh
    2) : coarse, vulgar
    grosero, -ra n
    : rude person
    * * *
    grosero adj rude

    Spanish-English dictionary > grosero

  • 5 impertinente

    adj.
    1 impertinent.
    ponerse impertinente to be impertinent o rude
    2 cheeky, given to answering back, mouthy, lippy.
    f. & m.
    1 impertinent person (person).
    2 busybody, meddlesome person, snooper.
    * * *
    1 impertinent
    1 lorgnette sing
    * * *
    1. ADJ
    1) (=insolente) impertinent
    2) frm (=irrelevante) irrelevant, not pertinent
    2.
    SMPL lorgnette sing
    * * *
    I
    a) ( irrespetuoso) <persona/pregunta/tono> impertinent
    b) ( inoportuno) <momento/hora> inopportune (frml), inappropriate; < llamada> ill-timed; < comentario> uncalled-for
    II
    masculino y femenino
    1) ( persona)
    2) impertinentes masculino plural lorgnette
    * * *
    = cheeky [cheekier -comp., cheekiest -sup.], short, short-tempered, off-hand [offhand], saucy [saucier -comp., sauciest -sup.], pert.
    Ex. The young man in the picture is myself snapped twenty-five years or so ago by a cheeky thirteen-year-old during the first few months of my first teaching job.
    Ex. He first spotted trouble when she started being short with users and so he solved the problem by scaling back her workload.
    Ex. A medical doctor had told him that the reason why women have faster pulse beats is because they are short-tempered.
    Ex. The osteopath was accused of being off-hand with a female patient and not putting her at ease.
    Ex. Singers and other entertainers in Burma have been warned to cut out saucy behaviour and be neat and tidy or face the consequences.
    Ex. He lingered round the bookstall looking at the books and papers till a pert girl behind the counter asked him if he wouldn't like a chair.
    * * *
    I
    a) ( irrespetuoso) <persona/pregunta/tono> impertinent
    b) ( inoportuno) <momento/hora> inopportune (frml), inappropriate; < llamada> ill-timed; < comentario> uncalled-for
    II
    masculino y femenino
    1) ( persona)
    2) impertinentes masculino plural lorgnette
    * * *
    = cheeky [cheekier -comp., cheekiest -sup.], short, short-tempered, off-hand [offhand], saucy [saucier -comp., sauciest -sup.], pert.

    Ex: The young man in the picture is myself snapped twenty-five years or so ago by a cheeky thirteen-year-old during the first few months of my first teaching job.

    Ex: He first spotted trouble when she started being short with users and so he solved the problem by scaling back her workload.
    Ex: A medical doctor had told him that the reason why women have faster pulse beats is because they are short-tempered.
    Ex: The osteopath was accused of being off-hand with a female patient and not putting her at ease.
    Ex: Singers and other entertainers in Burma have been warned to cut out saucy behaviour and be neat and tidy or face the consequences.
    Ex: He lingered round the bookstall looking at the books and papers till a pert girl behind the counter asked him if he wouldn't like a chair.

    * * *
    1 (descarado, irrespetuoso) ‹persona› impertinent; ‹pregunta/risa/tono› impertinent
    2 (inoportuno, fuera de lugar) ‹momento/hora› inopportune ( frml), inappropriate; ‹llamada› ill-timed; ‹comentario› uncalled-for
    me parece impertinente entrar en este momento I don't think this is a very good o opportune moment to go in
    3 ( frml) (no relevante) irrelevant
    A
    (persona): eres una impertinente you're very impertinent
    B impertinentes mpl lorgnette
    * * *

    impertinente adjetivo ‹persona/pregunta/tono impertinent;
    comentario uncalled-for
    ■ sustantivo masculino y femenino ( persona):

    impertinente
    I adjetivo
    1 (atrevido) impertinent: estuvo muy impertinente con nosotros, she was impertinent
    2 (improcedente) irrelevant
    II mf impertinent person
    III mpl impertinentes, lorgnette sing

    ' impertinente' also found in these entries:
    English:
    impertinent
    - intrusive
    - nosy
    - presumptuous
    * * *
    adj
    1. [insolente] impertinent;
    no te pongas impertinente con tu madre don't be rude o impertinent to your mother;
    hoy estás muy impertinente you're being very impertinent today
    2. [inoportuno] inappropriate
    nmf
    [persona] impertinent person;
    es un impertinente he's very rude o impertinent
    impertinentes nmpl
    [anteojos] lorgnette
    * * *
    I adj impertinent
    II m/f
    :
    ¡eres un impertinente! you’re so impertinent!
    * * *
    1) insolente: impertinent, insolent
    2) inoportuno: inappropriate, uncalled-for
    3) irrelevante: irrelevant
    * * *
    impertinente adj impertinent

    Spanish-English dictionary > impertinente

  • 6 insolente

    adj.
    insolent (descarado).
    f. & m.
    insolent person.
    pres.subj.
    3rd person singular (él/ella/ello) Present Subjunctive of Spanish verb: insolentar.
    * * *
    1 (descarado) insolent
    2 (soberbio) haughty
    nombre masculino,nombre femenino
    1 (descarado) insolent person
    2 (soberbio) haughty person
    * * *
    ADJ
    1) (=descarado) insolent, rude
    2) (=altivo) haughty, contemptuous
    * * *
    I
    adjetivo rude, insolent
    II
    masculino y femenino
    * * *
    = insolent, brash [brasher -comp., brashest -sup.], cheeky [cheekier -comp., cheekiest -sup.], petulant, uncouth, sassy [sassier -comp., sassiest -sup.], flamer, brazen, impudent, short, short-tempered, off-hand [offhand], saucy [saucier -comp., sauciest -sup.], pert.
    Ex. He had always anathematized those who took unscrupulous advantage of their positions, and those who succumbed to their insolent methods.
    Ex. Caslon rejected the brash contrast of the later Dutch founts, and produced types that were without serious blemish, but also without much life.
    Ex. The young man in the picture is myself snapped twenty-five years or so ago by a cheeky thirteen-year-old during the first few months of my first teaching job.
    Ex. His manner was more animated, but not in the usual petulant sense: he even seemed years younger.
    Ex. All the writers chosen characterized eastern Europe throughout the 18th century as uncouth and backward.
    Ex. This series of personal essays are at various times sassy, profound, superficial, and maddening.
    Ex. Like other technologies, the Internet is vulnerable to misuse by hostile individuals ( flamers), sexual predators, and pornographers.
    Ex. They accepted the government's brazen lies stating that Ramón Colás, the co-founder of the library movement, has not been arrested as a prisoner of conscience.
    Ex. The Library Association is impudent in suggesting that it will impose sanctions on those who fail to keep abreast of developments in librarianship.
    Ex. He first spotted trouble when she started being short with users and so he solved the problem by scaling back her workload.
    Ex. A medical doctor had told him that the reason why women have faster pulse beats is because they are short-tempered.
    Ex. The osteopath was accused of being off-hand with a female patient and not putting her at ease.
    Ex. Singers and other entertainers in Burma have been warned to cut out saucy behaviour and be neat and tidy or face the consequences.
    Ex. He lingered round the bookstall looking at the books and papers till a pert girl behind the counter asked him if he wouldn't like a chair.
    ----
    * de un modo insolente = defiantly.
    * * *
    I
    adjetivo rude, insolent
    II
    masculino y femenino
    * * *
    = insolent, brash [brasher -comp., brashest -sup.], cheeky [cheekier -comp., cheekiest -sup.], petulant, uncouth, sassy [sassier -comp., sassiest -sup.], flamer, brazen, impudent, short, short-tempered, off-hand [offhand], saucy [saucier -comp., sauciest -sup.], pert.

    Ex: He had always anathematized those who took unscrupulous advantage of their positions, and those who succumbed to their insolent methods.

    Ex: Caslon rejected the brash contrast of the later Dutch founts, and produced types that were without serious blemish, but also without much life.
    Ex: The young man in the picture is myself snapped twenty-five years or so ago by a cheeky thirteen-year-old during the first few months of my first teaching job.
    Ex: His manner was more animated, but not in the usual petulant sense: he even seemed years younger.
    Ex: All the writers chosen characterized eastern Europe throughout the 18th century as uncouth and backward.
    Ex: This series of personal essays are at various times sassy, profound, superficial, and maddening.
    Ex: Like other technologies, the Internet is vulnerable to misuse by hostile individuals ( flamers), sexual predators, and pornographers.
    Ex: They accepted the government's brazen lies stating that Ramón Colás, the co-founder of the library movement, has not been arrested as a prisoner of conscience.
    Ex: The Library Association is impudent in suggesting that it will impose sanctions on those who fail to keep abreast of developments in librarianship.
    Ex: He first spotted trouble when she started being short with users and so he solved the problem by scaling back her workload.
    Ex: A medical doctor had told him that the reason why women have faster pulse beats is because they are short-tempered.
    Ex: The osteopath was accused of being off-hand with a female patient and not putting her at ease.
    Ex: Singers and other entertainers in Burma have been warned to cut out saucy behaviour and be neat and tidy or face the consequences.
    Ex: He lingered round the bookstall looking at the books and papers till a pert girl behind the counter asked him if he wouldn't like a chair.
    * de un modo insolente = defiantly.

    * * *
    ‹persona› rude, insolent; ‹respuesta/actitud› insolent
    es una insolente she's so rude o insolent
    * * *

    Del verbo insolentar: ( conjugate insolentar)

    insolenté es:

    1ª persona singular (yo) pretérito indicativo

    insolente es:

    1ª persona singular (yo) presente subjuntivo

    3ª persona singular (él/ella/usted) presente subjuntivo

    3ª persona singular (él/ella/usted) imperativo

    insolente adjetivo
    rude, insolent
    ■ sustantivo masculino y femenino:
    es una insolente she's so rude o insolent

    insolente adjetivo insolent

    ' insolente' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    atrevida
    - atrevido
    - chula
    - chulo
    - descarada
    - descarado
    - farruca
    - farruco
    - malencarada
    - malencarado
    - liso
    English:
    audacious
    - defiant
    - impudent
    - insolent
    - saucy
    * * *
    adj
    [descarado] insolent; [orgulloso] haughty
    nmf
    insolent person;
    es un insolente he's very insolent
    * * *
    adj insolent
    * * *
    impertinente: insolent

    Spanish-English dictionary > insolente

  • 7 irascible

    adj.
    1 irascible.
    2 angry, crabby, gnarled, morose.
    * * *
    1 irascible, irritable
    * * *
    ADJ irascible frm
    * * *
    adjetivo irascible
    * * *
    = tetchy [tetchier -comp., tetchiest -sup.], peevish, irascible, crabby [crabbier -comp., crabbiest, -sup.], short, short-tempered, off-hand [offhand], ornery, waspish, explosive, testy [testier -comp., testiest -sup.].
    Ex. CC uses this device in Literature, where authors are specified by their date of birth (though Ranganathan has a rather tetchy note about the difficulty of establishing this in some cases).
    Ex. In 1912 a group of women library students were accused of lacking a sense of proportion, being peevish and being absorbed in small details.
    Ex. He was a rag-and-bone man living with his irascible father in a junkyard with only their horse for company.
    Ex. The normally perky and intrepid Cristina is flat out crabby these days.
    Ex. He first spotted trouble when she started being short with users and so he solved the problem by scaling back her workload.
    Ex. A medical doctor had told him that the reason why women have faster pulse beats is because they are short-tempered.
    Ex. The osteopath was accused of being off-hand with a female patient and not putting her at ease.
    Ex. My mama says that alligators are ornery because they got all them teeth and no toothbrush.
    Ex. But as you read this sentence, you cannot fail to hear his voice, cosy, waspish, inimitable.
    Ex. The explosive Cameron Shepherd then brought the Wallabies to within a point of France with the team's second try five minutes later.
    Ex. We're assailed by doubts, mortified by our own shortcomings, surrounded by freaks, testy over silly details.
    * * *
    adjetivo irascible
    * * *
    = tetchy [tetchier -comp., tetchiest -sup.], peevish, irascible, crabby [crabbier -comp., crabbiest, -sup.], short, short-tempered, off-hand [offhand], ornery, waspish, explosive, testy [testier -comp., testiest -sup.].

    Ex: CC uses this device in Literature, where authors are specified by their date of birth (though Ranganathan has a rather tetchy note about the difficulty of establishing this in some cases).

    Ex: In 1912 a group of women library students were accused of lacking a sense of proportion, being peevish and being absorbed in small details.
    Ex: He was a rag-and-bone man living with his irascible father in a junkyard with only their horse for company.
    Ex: The normally perky and intrepid Cristina is flat out crabby these days.
    Ex: He first spotted trouble when she started being short with users and so he solved the problem by scaling back her workload.
    Ex: A medical doctor had told him that the reason why women have faster pulse beats is because they are short-tempered.
    Ex: The osteopath was accused of being off-hand with a female patient and not putting her at ease.
    Ex: My mama says that alligators are ornery because they got all them teeth and no toothbrush.
    Ex: But as you read this sentence, you cannot fail to hear his voice, cosy, waspish, inimitable.
    Ex: The explosive Cameron Shepherd then brought the Wallabies to within a point of France with the team's second try five minutes later.
    Ex: We're assailed by doubts, mortified by our own shortcomings, surrounded by freaks, testy over silly details.

    * * *
    irascible
    * * *

    irascible adjetivo irascible, irritable, short-tempered
    ' irascible' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    temperamental
    English:
    cantankerous
    - hot-headed
    - irascible
    - quicktempered
    - crusty
    - hot
    - quick
    - snappy
    * * *
    irascible
    * * *
    adj irascible
    * * *
    : irascible, irritable

    Spanish-English dictionary > irascible

  • 8 reducir

    v.
    1 to reduce.
    nos han reducido el sueldo our salary has been cut
    reducir algo a algo to reduce something to something
    reducir algo al absurdo to make a nonsense of something
    Ella redujo la velocidad She reduced the speed.
    2 to suppress, to subdue (someter) (país, ciudad).
    3 to convert (Mat) (convertir).
    4 to set (medicine).
    5 to shorten, to shrink.
    Ellos redujeron las tablas They shortened the boards.
    6 to cut down, to depress, to de-escalate, to deescalate.
    Ellos redujeron los gastos They cut down expenses.
    7 to conquer, to subdue, to subjugate.
    Ellos redujeron a los nativos They conquered the natives.
    8 to hydrogenate.
    * * *
    Conjugation model [ CONDUCIR], like link=conducir conducir
    1 (gen) to reduce
    2 (disminuir) to reduce, cut, cut down on
    3 (vencer) to subdue
    4 MEDICINA to set
    5 (una salsa, etc) to reduce, boil down
    1 AUTOMÓVIL to change down, change to a lower gear
    1 (gen) to be reduced; (decrecer) to decrease
    2 (resultar) to come down (a, to)
    * * *
    verb
    1) to reduce, cut
    * * *
    1. VT
    1) (=disminuir)
    a) [en cantidad] [+ gastos, inflación, precio] to reduce, bring down, cut; [+ tensión, ansiedad] to reduce; [+ riesgo] to reduce, lessen

    el autobús redujo su velocidad — the bus reduced speed, the bus slowed down

    el banco redujo su beneficio un 12% — the bank saw its profits fall by 12%

    reducir algo en algo — to reduce sth by sth, cut sth by sth

    tenemos que reducir la producción en un 20% — we have to reduce o cut production by 20%

    reducir a la mínima expresiónto reduce to the bare minimum

    reducir algo al mínimoto reduce o cut sth to the minimum

    reducir algo a la mitadto cut sth by half

    b) [en tiempo] [+ jornada laboral] to reduce, shorten; [+ sentencia] to reduce

    han reducido la mili a nueve mesesthey have reduced o cut military service to nine months

    c) [en tamaño] [+ copia] to reduce; [+ discurso, artículo] to cut down, shorten
    2)

    reducir algo a algo —

    a) (=limitar) to limit sth to sth; (=simplificar) to reduce sth to sth
    b) (=convertir) [+ cantidad, medida] to convert sth into sth; [+ fracción, ecuación] to reduce sth into sth
    3) (=someter) [+ ladrón, fugitivo, loco] to overpower; [+ alborotadores] to subdue; [+ fortaleza] to subdue, reduce frm

    reducir a algn a la obedienciato bring sb to heel

    reducir a algn al silencio[por la fuerza, por miedo] to silence sb; [por vergüenza, humillación] to reduce sb to silence

    4) (Med) [+ hueso, hernia] to set, reduce frm
    5) (Quím) to reduce
    6) LAm [en el mercado negro] to get rid of *
    2.
    VI (Aut) to change down
    3.
    See:
    * * *
    1.
    verbo transitivo
    1)
    a) <gastos/costos> to cut, reduce; <velocidad/producción/consumo> to reduce

    reducir al mínimo los riesgosto minimize o to reduce the risks to a minimum

    le redujeron la penathey shortened o reduced his sentence

    reducir algo a su mínima expresión — (Mat) to reduce something to its simplest form

    b) <fotocopia/fotografía> to reduce
    2)

    reducir algo A algo: reducir los gramos a milígramos to convert the grams to milligrams; quedaron reducidos a cenizas they were reduced to ashes; mis ilusiones quedaron reducidas a la nada — my dreams came to nothing

    b) (Quím) to reduce
    c) (AmS) < objeto robado> to receive, fence (colloq)
    3) ( dominar) <enemigo/rebeldes> to subdue; < ladrón> to overpower
    4) <fractura/hernia> to set, reduce (tech)
    2.
    1) (Coc) to reduce, boil down
    2) (Auto) to shift into a lower gear
    3.
    reducirse v pron

    reducirse A algo: todo se reduce a tener tacto it all comes down to being tactful; todo se redujo a un paseo por el río — in the end it was just a walk by the river

    * * *
    = abridge, compress, contract, curtail, erode, gut, narrow, prune, reduce, shorten, stifle, lower, cut back (on), cut, cut down (on), deplete, lessen, pare down, keep down + Nombre, retrench, narrow down, whittle (away/down/at), slim down, slow down, slow up, taper, wind + Nombre + down, cut + Nombre + short, scale back, downgrade [down-grade], shave off, shrink, mark + Nombre + down.
    Ex. Inevitably any abridgement poses the dilemma how to abridge, that is, what to leave out and what to include.
    Ex. A library of a million volumes could be compressed into one end of a desk.
    Ex. In the face of emergencies, breadth of vision tends to contract, narrowing the range of responses.
    Ex. The imposition of fee-based services may radically curtail the breadth of resources available to library users where historically information has been offered freely.
    Ex. These arrangements should also erode price differentials between Europe and the US, and permit each country to support its own online services.
    Ex. Prices of European produced scientific, technical and medical serials continue to gut US research libraries.
    Ex. Hierarchical relationships must be indicated in order that the users may broaden or narrow the search parameters.
    Ex. More balanced schedules were achieved by pruning the 31000 subjects enumerated in the fourteenth edition to 4700.
    Ex. The disadvantage of inversion of words is that inversion or indirect word order reduces predictability of form of headings.
    Ex. If there are holds on the title, the loan period is shortened to 14 days.
    Ex. Excessive emphasis on the need to exact payment will stifle the flow of information.
    Ex. When a forme was in place on the press stone, paper was lowered on to it by means of a tympan and frisket.
    Ex. But higher education, which expanded between 1959 and 1979 from 164,000 to 519,600 students in full-time higher education, has also been cutting back on purchases.
    Ex. 'The word's out: all departments have to cut their staffs by 10%' -- Her voice was weak and laden with woe.
    Ex. Abstracts cut down considerably on legwork in hunting for information.
    Ex. This intermediate grade would equate with the senior library assistant, a category much depleted in UK academic librarianship.
    Ex. Two possible solutions are possible: (1) to lessen the frequency of production, or (2) to reduce the amount of detail in the entries.
    Ex. He said again that we should pare it down to something much more in line with his figures.
    Ex. Activities such as gardening or cookery are dealt with in many books in ways which go far beyond the simple keeping down of weeds or just filling empty stomachs.
    Ex. In the face of overpublishing and growing scepticism, this once booming area is now retrenching and broadening its coverage = En vista del exceso de publicaciones y del creciente escepticismo, este área que una vez estuvo en auge ahora ha venido a menos.
    Ex. By specifying the fields to be searched, the user can narrow down the search in a very convenient way.
    Ex. However, such idealism is often whittled away over time by bureaucratic problems & organizational demands.
    Ex. The abundance of book types and titles makes display and merchandising increasingly difficult; some booksellers are dealing with this by slimming down or cutting out certain categories.
    Ex. However, the flight from DC appears to have slowed down more quickly than was anticipated, and we no longer read of large numbers of libraries making the change.
    Ex. Since cataloging is the most time consuming part of digitization, it has slowed up the placement of files.
    Ex. The tube in the two types tapers almost unnoticeably from base to tip.
    Ex. Not the least of the ironies of this venture is that going ahead with it is as full of hazard as winding it down abruptly.
    Ex. May I just cut you short, because I've discussed this problem with Peter Jacobs just this week.
    Ex. He first spotted trouble when she started being short with users and so he solved the problem by scaling back her workload.
    Ex. The opposite of the 'halo effect' -- downgrading someone you dislike but whose work is good -- is also an error.
    Ex. You can shave off as much as 50% or even more from your current rate for home insurance in Arizona.
    Ex. The 'false hit' problem still arises, but becomes less likely as the 'neighborhood' of the two words shrinks.
    Ex. They have just marked down all summer handbags to 50 percent off.
    ----
    * que reduce el estrés = stress-reducing.
    * reducir a cero = reduce to + nil.
    * reducir a la mitad = halve, cut in + half, halve, reduce by + half.
    * reducir a la nada = reduce to + nil.
    * reducir al mínimo = minimise [minimize, -USA], reduce to + a minimum, cut down to + a minimum, keep to + a (bare) minimum, cut to + the bone.
    * reducir a lo mínimo = cut to + the bone.
    * reducir a miniatura = miniaturise [miniaturize, -USA].
    * reducir costes = reduce + costs.
    * reducir de plantilla = downsize.
    * reducir de tamaño = reduce in + size.
    * reducir el esfuerzo = reduce + effort.
    * reducir el impacto = minimise + impact.
    * reducir el papeleo = slash + red tape.
    * reducir el precio = reduce + price, cut + price.
    * reducir el presupuesto = cut + monies from + budget.
    * reducir el riesgo = reduce + risk.
    * reducir el tamaño = reduce + size.
    * reducir el tiempo = cut down + time.
    * reducir el valor = reduce + value.
    * reducir gastos = cut + costs, cut + spending, make + economies, make + cuts, reduce + costs.
    * reducir gradualmente = scale down.
    * reducir la burocracia = slash + red tape.
    * reducir la posibilidad = minimise + possibility.
    * reducir la probabilidad = reduce + chances.
    * reducir las diferencias = bridge + the gap, bridge + the divide, bridge + the chasm, bridge + the gulf, close + the gap.
    * reducir las diferencias entre... y = narrow + the gap between... and.
    * reducir las distancias = reduce + distance, close + the gap.
    * reducir las posibilidades de = narrow + the vision of.
    * reducir los beneficios = cut + profit.
    * reducir los impuestos = cut + taxes.
    * reducir pérdidas = cut down + losses, cut + losses.
    * reducir progresivamente = phase out.
    * reducirse a = boil down to, come down to.
    * reducirse poco a poco = dribble off.
    * reducir una limitación = push + limits (further and further back).
    * reducir una palabra a su raíz = stem.
    * reducir un obstáculo = lower + barrier.
    * * *
    1.
    verbo transitivo
    1)
    a) <gastos/costos> to cut, reduce; <velocidad/producción/consumo> to reduce

    reducir al mínimo los riesgosto minimize o to reduce the risks to a minimum

    le redujeron la penathey shortened o reduced his sentence

    reducir algo a su mínima expresión — (Mat) to reduce something to its simplest form

    b) <fotocopia/fotografía> to reduce
    2)

    reducir algo A algo: reducir los gramos a milígramos to convert the grams to milligrams; quedaron reducidos a cenizas they were reduced to ashes; mis ilusiones quedaron reducidas a la nada — my dreams came to nothing

    b) (Quím) to reduce
    c) (AmS) < objeto robado> to receive, fence (colloq)
    3) ( dominar) <enemigo/rebeldes> to subdue; < ladrón> to overpower
    4) <fractura/hernia> to set, reduce (tech)
    2.
    1) (Coc) to reduce, boil down
    2) (Auto) to shift into a lower gear
    3.
    reducirse v pron

    reducirse A algo: todo se reduce a tener tacto it all comes down to being tactful; todo se redujo a un paseo por el río — in the end it was just a walk by the river

    * * *
    = abridge, compress, contract, curtail, erode, gut, narrow, prune, reduce, shorten, stifle, lower, cut back (on), cut, cut down (on), deplete, lessen, pare down, keep down + Nombre, retrench, narrow down, whittle (away/down/at), slim down, slow down, slow up, taper, wind + Nombre + down, cut + Nombre + short, scale back, downgrade [down-grade], shave off, shrink, mark + Nombre + down.

    Ex: Inevitably any abridgement poses the dilemma how to abridge, that is, what to leave out and what to include.

    Ex: A library of a million volumes could be compressed into one end of a desk.
    Ex: In the face of emergencies, breadth of vision tends to contract, narrowing the range of responses.
    Ex: The imposition of fee-based services may radically curtail the breadth of resources available to library users where historically information has been offered freely.
    Ex: These arrangements should also erode price differentials between Europe and the US, and permit each country to support its own online services.
    Ex: Prices of European produced scientific, technical and medical serials continue to gut US research libraries.
    Ex: Hierarchical relationships must be indicated in order that the users may broaden or narrow the search parameters.
    Ex: More balanced schedules were achieved by pruning the 31000 subjects enumerated in the fourteenth edition to 4700.
    Ex: The disadvantage of inversion of words is that inversion or indirect word order reduces predictability of form of headings.
    Ex: If there are holds on the title, the loan period is shortened to 14 days.
    Ex: Excessive emphasis on the need to exact payment will stifle the flow of information.
    Ex: When a forme was in place on the press stone, paper was lowered on to it by means of a tympan and frisket.
    Ex: But higher education, which expanded between 1959 and 1979 from 164,000 to 519,600 students in full-time higher education, has also been cutting back on purchases.
    Ex: 'The word's out: all departments have to cut their staffs by 10%' -- Her voice was weak and laden with woe.
    Ex: Abstracts cut down considerably on legwork in hunting for information.
    Ex: This intermediate grade would equate with the senior library assistant, a category much depleted in UK academic librarianship.
    Ex: Two possible solutions are possible: (1) to lessen the frequency of production, or (2) to reduce the amount of detail in the entries.
    Ex: He said again that we should pare it down to something much more in line with his figures.
    Ex: Activities such as gardening or cookery are dealt with in many books in ways which go far beyond the simple keeping down of weeds or just filling empty stomachs.
    Ex: In the face of overpublishing and growing scepticism, this once booming area is now retrenching and broadening its coverage = En vista del exceso de publicaciones y del creciente escepticismo, este área que una vez estuvo en auge ahora ha venido a menos.
    Ex: By specifying the fields to be searched, the user can narrow down the search in a very convenient way.
    Ex: However, such idealism is often whittled away over time by bureaucratic problems & organizational demands.
    Ex: The abundance of book types and titles makes display and merchandising increasingly difficult; some booksellers are dealing with this by slimming down or cutting out certain categories.
    Ex: However, the flight from DC appears to have slowed down more quickly than was anticipated, and we no longer read of large numbers of libraries making the change.
    Ex: Since cataloging is the most time consuming part of digitization, it has slowed up the placement of files.
    Ex: The tube in the two types tapers almost unnoticeably from base to tip.
    Ex: Not the least of the ironies of this venture is that going ahead with it is as full of hazard as winding it down abruptly.
    Ex: May I just cut you short, because I've discussed this problem with Peter Jacobs just this week.
    Ex: He first spotted trouble when she started being short with users and so he solved the problem by scaling back her workload.
    Ex: The opposite of the 'halo effect' -- downgrading someone you dislike but whose work is good -- is also an error.
    Ex: You can shave off as much as 50% or even more from your current rate for home insurance in Arizona.
    Ex: The 'false hit' problem still arises, but becomes less likely as the 'neighborhood' of the two words shrinks.
    Ex: They have just marked down all summer handbags to 50 percent off.
    * que reduce el estrés = stress-reducing.
    * reducir a cero = reduce to + nil.
    * reducir a la mitad = halve, cut in + half, halve, reduce by + half.
    * reducir a la nada = reduce to + nil.
    * reducir al mínimo = minimise [minimize, -USA], reduce to + a minimum, cut down to + a minimum, keep to + a (bare) minimum, cut to + the bone.
    * reducir a lo mínimo = cut to + the bone.
    * reducir a miniatura = miniaturise [miniaturize, -USA].
    * reducir costes = reduce + costs.
    * reducir de plantilla = downsize.
    * reducir de tamaño = reduce in + size.
    * reducir el esfuerzo = reduce + effort.
    * reducir el impacto = minimise + impact.
    * reducir el papeleo = slash + red tape.
    * reducir el precio = reduce + price, cut + price.
    * reducir el presupuesto = cut + monies from + budget.
    * reducir el riesgo = reduce + risk.
    * reducir el tamaño = reduce + size.
    * reducir el tiempo = cut down + time.
    * reducir el valor = reduce + value.
    * reducir gastos = cut + costs, cut + spending, make + economies, make + cuts, reduce + costs.
    * reducir gradualmente = scale down.
    * reducir la burocracia = slash + red tape.
    * reducir la posibilidad = minimise + possibility.
    * reducir la probabilidad = reduce + chances.
    * reducir las diferencias = bridge + the gap, bridge + the divide, bridge + the chasm, bridge + the gulf, close + the gap.
    * reducir las diferencias entre... y = narrow + the gap between... and.
    * reducir las distancias = reduce + distance, close + the gap.
    * reducir las posibilidades de = narrow + the vision of.
    * reducir los beneficios = cut + profit.
    * reducir los impuestos = cut + taxes.
    * reducir pérdidas = cut down + losses, cut + losses.
    * reducir progresivamente = phase out.
    * reducirse a = boil down to, come down to.
    * reducirse poco a poco = dribble off.
    * reducir una limitación = push + limits (further and further back).
    * reducir una palabra a su raíz = stem.
    * reducir un obstáculo = lower + barrier.

    * * *
    reducir [I6 ]
    vt
    A
    1 ‹gastos/costos› to cut, cut down on, reduce; ‹velocidad› to reduce; ‹producción/consumo› to reduce
    hemos reducido el número de casos we have brought down o reduced the number of cases
    redujeron el número de plazas they cut the number of places o the number of places was reduced
    han prometido reducir los impuestos they have promised to cut o reduce taxes
    con esto se intenta reducir al mínimo el riesgo de infección this is intended to minimize o to reduce to a minimum the risk of infection
    ejercicios para reducir (la) cintura exercises to reduce your waistline
    reducir algo A algo to reduce sth TO sth
    han reducido el texto a 50 páginas they have shortened o reduced the text to fifty pages
    le han reducido la pena a dos años they have commuted o shortened o reduced his sentence to two years
    la población quedó reducida a la mitad the population was reduced to half of its former size
    reducir algo a su mínima expresión ( Mat) to reduce sth to its simplest expression o form
    el suéter quedó reducido a su mínima expresión ( hum); the sweater shrank to nothing
    reducir algo EN algo to reduce sth BY sth
    pretenden reducir el gasto en cinco millones they aim to reduce costs by five million
    2 ‹fotocopia/fotografía› to reduce
    B
    1 (transformar) reducir algo A algo:
    reducir los gramos a miligramos to convert the grams to milligrams
    reducir quebrados a un mínimo común denominador to reduce fractions to their lowest common denominator
    quedaron reducidos a cenizas they were reduced to ashes
    2 ( Quím) to reduce
    3 ( AmS) ‹objeto robado› to receive, fence ( colloq)
    C (dominar, someter) ‹enemigo/rebeldes› to subdue; ‹ladrón› to overpower
    reducir a un pueblo a la esclavitud to reduce a people to slavery
    D ‹fractura/hernia› to set, reduce ( tech)
    E (CS) ‹cadáver/restos mortales› to exhume ( for reburial in a niche or smaller coffin)
    ■ reducir
    vi
    A ( Coc) to reduce, boil down
    dejar reducir la salsa leave the sauce to boil down o reduce
    B ( Auto) to shift into a lower gear, change down ( BrE)
    reducirse A algo:
    todo se reduce a saber interpretar las cifras it all comes down to knowing how to interpret the figures
    todo se redujo a una visita a la catedral y un paseo por el río in the end it was just a visit to the cathedral and a walk along the river
    * * *

     

    reducir ( conjugate reducir) verbo transitivo
    1
    a)gastos/costos to cut, reduce;

    velocidad/producción/consumo to reduce;

    reducir algo A algo to reduce sth to sth;
    reducir algo EN algo to reduce sth by sth
    b)fotocopia/fotografía to reduce

    2


    quedaron reducidos a cenizas they were reduced to ashes
    b) (AmS) ‹ objeto robado to receive, fence (colloq)

    3 ( dominar) ‹enemigo/rebeldes to subdue;
    ladrón to overpower
    reducirse verbo pronominal:

    reducir
    I verbo transitivo
    1 (disminuir) to reduce
    reducir algo en algo, to reduce sthg by sthg
    (gastos, consumo, etc) to cut (down), minimize
    2 (convertir, transformar) to reduce: el incendio redujo el bosque a cenizas, the fire reduced the wood to ashes
    3 (subyugar) to subdue
    II vi Auto to change down, US to downshift

    ' reducir' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    bajar
    - ceniza
    - encaminada
    - encaminado
    - moler
    - disminuir
    - minimizar
    - mínimo
    - mira
    English:
    administrative
    - austerity
    - ax
    - axe
    - change down
    - corner
    - curtail
    - cut
    - cut back
    - cut down
    - decrease
    - deficit
    - deplenish
    - deplete
    - depress
    - downsize
    - effective
    - halve
    - lighten
    - lower
    - narrow down
    - prune
    - pulp
    - rate
    - receive
    - reduce
    - retrench
    - scale down
    - shorten
    - slow
    - wind down
    - bring
    - cost
    - deaden
    - decelerate
    - diminish
    - discount
    - get
    - lessen
    - loss
    - minimize
    - over
    - pare
    - scale
    - slacken
    - traffic
    - whittle
    - wind
    * * *
    vt
    1. [disminuir] to reduce;
    [gastos, costes, impuestos, plantilla] to cut; [producción] to cut (back on);
    nos han reducido el sueldo our salary has been cut;
    reduzca la velocidad [en letrero] reduce speed now;
    reducir algo a algo to reduce sth to sth;
    el edificio quedó reducido a escombros the building was reduced to a pile of rubble;
    reducir algo al mínimo to reduce sth to a minimum;
    reducir algo a o [m5] en la mitad to reduce sth by half;
    tú todo lo reduces a tener dinero the only thing you care about is money;
    reducir a la mínima expresión to cut down to the bare minimum
    2. [fotocopia] to reduce
    3. [someter] [país, ciudad] to suppress, to subdue;
    [atracador, ladrón, sublevados] to overpower
    4. Mat [unidades de medida] to convert (a to); [fracciones, ecuaciones] to cancel out
    5. Med [hueso] to set
    6. Quím to reduce
    7. Culin [guiso, salsa] to reduce
    8. Andes, RP [objetos robados] to receive, to fence
    9. RP [cadáver] to exhume [for reburial in smaller container]
    vi
    1. [en el automóvil]
    reducir (de marcha o [m5] velocidad) to change down;
    reduce a tercera change down into third (gear)
    2. Culin [guiso, salsa] to reduce
    * * *
    v/t
    1 reduce (a to); gastos cut;
    reducir personal cut jobs, reduce staff numbers;
    reducir la marcha AUTO downshift, shift into a lower gear
    2 MIL overcome
    * * *
    reducir {61} vt
    1) disminuir: to reduce, to decrease, to cut
    2) : to subdue
    3) : to boil down
    * * *
    reducir vb to reduce

    Spanish-English dictionary > reducir

  • 9 play-back

    [ˈpleißak] ( plural play-backs) sustantivo masculino
    play-back
    play-back ['ple6CBF8257i6CBF8257βak]
    < play-backs> Play-back neutro

    Diccionario Español-Alemán > play-back

  • 10 play back

    playback ['plejbak] masculino playback
    * * *
    playback ['plejbak] masculino playback
    * * *
    play back, playback
    /ˈplejbak/
    1 (Audio, Video) playback
    2 ( Espec):
    no están cantando de verdad, es play back they're not really singing, they're just miming

    Spanish-English dictionary > play back

  • 11 play-back

    /pleiˈbak/
    (pl play-backs)
    playback
    * * *
    play-back ['plei£ak] (pl play-backs) nm
    cantar en o [m5] hacer play-back to mime (the lyrics)

    Spanish-English dictionary > play-back

  • 12 flash-back

    m flashback

    Spanish-English dictionary > flash-back

  • 13 feed-back climático

    Dictionnaire anglais-français de géographie > feed-back climático

  • 14 contrato buy-back

    El diccionario Español-ruso económico > contrato buy-back

  • 15 crédito back-to-back

    El diccionario Español-ruso económico > crédito back-to-back

  • 16 sistema de draw back

    El diccionario Español-ruso económico > sistema de draw back

  • 17 transacciones buy-back

    сделка "бай-бэк" (поставка оборудования и технологии с условием погашения кредита за счёт продукта)

    El diccionario Español-ruso económico > transacciones buy-back

  • 18 flash-back

    flaʃ'bak
    m CINE

    Diccionario Español-Alemán > flash-back

  • 19 back

    неизм.
    спорт. бек, защитник

    Испанско-русский универсальный словарь > back

  • 20 contrato buy-back

    Испанско-русский универсальный словарь > contrato buy-back

Look at other dictionaries:

  • scale something back — reduce something in size, number, or extent, esp. by a constant proportion across the board in the short term, even scaling back defense costs money * * * ˌscale sthˈdown derived (NAmE also ˌscale sthˈback) to reduce the number, size or extent of …   Useful english dictionary

  • Binary scaling — is a computer programming technique used mainly by embedded C, DSP and assembler programmers to perform a pseudo floating point using integer arithmetic.It is both faster and more accurate than directly using floating point instructions, however… …   Wikipedia

  • Dynamic frequency scaling — For the CPU design principle, see Frequency scaling. Dynamic frequency scaling (also known as CPU throttling) is a technique in computer architecture whereby the frequency of a microprocessor can be automatically adjusted on the fly, either to… …   Wikipedia

  • Dynamic voltage scaling — is a power management technique in computer architecture, where the voltage used in a component is increased or decreased, depending upon circumstances. Dynamic voltage scaling to increase voltage is known as overvolting; dynamic voltage scaling… …   Wikipedia

  • scale back — phrasal verb scale down or scale back [transitive] Word forms scale down : present tense I/you/we/they scale down he/she/it scales down present participle scaling down past tense scaled down past participle scaled down to make something smaller… …   English dictionary

  • scale back — ˌscale ˈdown ˌscale ˈback [transitive] [present tense I/you/we/they scale down he/she/it scales down …   Useful english dictionary

  • international relations — a branch of political science dealing with the relations between nations. [1970 75] * * * Study of the relations of states with each other and with international organizations and certain subnational entities (e.g., bureaucracies and political… …   Universalium

  • Economic Affairs — ▪ 2006 Introduction In 2005 rising U.S. deficits, tight monetary policies, and higher oil prices triggered by hurricane damage in the Gulf of Mexico were moderating influences on the world economy and on U.S. stock markets, but some other… …   Universalium

  • scale — scale1 [ skeıl ] noun *** ▸ 1 size/degree/level/rate ▸ 2 arranged set ▸ 3 relationship of distance ▸ 4 for weighing ▸ 5 series of musical notes ▸ 6 hard flat piece of skin ▸ 7 substance on pipes ▸ + PHRASES 1. ) singular or uncount the size of… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • United States — a republic in the N Western Hemisphere comprising 48 conterminous states, the District of Columbia, and Alaska in North America, and Hawaii in the N Pacific. 267,954,767; conterminous United States, 3,022,387 sq. mi. (7,827,982 sq. km); with… …   Universalium

  • china — /chuy neuh/, n. 1. a translucent ceramic material, biscuit fired at a high temperature, its glaze fired at a low temperature. 2. any porcelain ware. 3. plates, cups, saucers, etc., collectively. 4. figurines made of porcelain or ceramic material …   Universalium


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

Wir verwenden Cookies für die beste Präsentation unserer Website. Wenn Sie diese Website weiterhin nutzen, stimmen Sie dem zu.