Translation: from latin

over which the rustics leaped at the feast of Pales

  • 1 Palilis

    Pălīlis, e, adj. [Pales], of or belonging to Pales:

    flamma Palilis,

    a fire of straw and hay, over which the rustics leaped at the feast of Pales, Ov. F. 4, 798:

    festa Palilia,

    id. M. 14, 774; Tib. 2, 5, 87.—Also as subst.:
    II.
    Pălīlĭa, ĭum (euphon. collat. form Părīlĭa, Varr. R. R. 2, 1, 9; Col. 7, 3, 11; Plin. 19, 5, 24, § 69 et saep.; cf. Prob. ad Verg. G. 3 init.; Charis. p. 43 P.; Mar. Vict. p. 2470 P.), n., the feast of Pales, the shepherd festival, celebrated on the 21st of April, the anniversary of the foundation of Rome, Varr. L. L. 6, 3, 15; Cic. Div. 2, 47, 98; cf. also Ov. F. 4, 721; Tib. 2, 5, 89:

    Parilia,

    Prop. 5, 1, 19; 5, 4, 75; Pers. 1, 72; Serv. Verg. G. 3 init.; Fest. p. 236 Müll.—Hence, Părīlīcĭus, a, um, occurring at the time of the Parilia, Plin. 18, 26, 66, § 247.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Palilis

  • 2 Parilicius

    Pălīlis, e, adj. [Pales], of or belonging to Pales:

    flamma Palilis,

    a fire of straw and hay, over which the rustics leaped at the feast of Pales, Ov. F. 4, 798:

    festa Palilia,

    id. M. 14, 774; Tib. 2, 5, 87.—Also as subst.:
    II.
    Pălīlĭa, ĭum (euphon. collat. form Părīlĭa, Varr. R. R. 2, 1, 9; Col. 7, 3, 11; Plin. 19, 5, 24, § 69 et saep.; cf. Prob. ad Verg. G. 3 init.; Charis. p. 43 P.; Mar. Vict. p. 2470 P.), n., the feast of Pales, the shepherd festival, celebrated on the 21st of April, the anniversary of the foundation of Rome, Varr. L. L. 6, 3, 15; Cic. Div. 2, 47, 98; cf. also Ov. F. 4, 721; Tib. 2, 5, 89:

    Parilia,

    Prop. 5, 1, 19; 5, 4, 75; Pers. 1, 72; Serv. Verg. G. 3 init.; Fest. p. 236 Müll.—Hence, Părīlīcĭus, a, um, occurring at the time of the Parilia, Plin. 18, 26, 66, § 247.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Parilicius

  • 3 amitto

    ā-mitto, mīsi, missum, 3, v. a. (amīsti, sync., = amisisti, Ter. Eun. 2, 2, 10; id. Hec. 2, 2, 9:

    amīssis, sync., = amiseris,

    Plaut. Bacch. 5, 2, 70).
    I.
    1. A.. In gen., to send away from one's self, to dismiss (thus, anteclass., freq. in Plaut. and Ter.): quod nos dicimus dimittere, antiqui etiam dicebant amittere, Don. ad Ter. Heaut. 3, 1, 71; Att. ap. Non. 75, 32:

    stulte feci, qui hunc (servum) amisi,

    Plaut. Mil. 4, 8, 66; id. ib. 4, 5, 25; so id. ib. 4, 5, 28:

    quo pacto hic servos suum erum hinc amittat domum,

    id. Capt. prol. 36:

    et te et hunc amittam hinc,

    id. ib. 2, 2, 82; so id. Most. 2, 2, 2; id. Men. 5, 8, 6 al.:

    ut neque mi jus sit amittendi nec retinendi copia,

    Ter. Phorm. 1, 3, 24; 5, 8, 27; id. And. 5, 3, 27; id. Heaut. 4, 8, 17 al.:

    testis mecum est anulus, quem amiserat,

    which he had sent away, id. Ad. 3, 2, 49; Varr. ap. Non. 83, 12.—
    B.
    Spec., to let go, let slip:

    praedā de manibus amissā,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 4, 20.—With simple abl.:

    praedam ex oculis manibusque amittere,

    Liv. 30, 24; 29, 32 et saep.:

    Sceledre, manibus amisisti praedam,

    Plaut. Mil. 2, 5, 47 Ritschl.—
    2.
    Trop.
    A.
    In gen.:

    istam rem certum est non amittere,

    Plaut. Am. 2, 2, 217:

    tibi hanc amittam noxiam unam,

    to remit, to pardon, id. Poen. 1, 2, 191:

    occasionem amittere,

    Ter. Eun. 3, 5, 58; so Cic. Caecin. 5, 15; id. Att. 15, 11; Caes. B. G. 3, 18 al. (opp. occasionem raptare, Cic.:

    arripere, Liv.: complecti, Plin. Min.: intellegere, Tac.): servire tempori et non amittere tempus cum sit datum,

    Cic. Att. 8, 3, 6:

    fidem amittere,

    to break their word given on oath, Nep. Eun. 10, 2 Dähn.; Ov. M. 15, 556 al.—
    B.
    Of trees, to let go, let fall, to drop, lose:

    punica florem amittit,

    Plin. 16, 26, 46, § 109:

    pyrus et amygdala amittunt florem et primos fructus,

    id. ib.:

    ocissime salix amittit semen,

    id. 16, 26, 46, § 110.—
    II.
    Esp., to lose (commonly without criminality, by mistake, accident, etc.; while perdere usually designates a losing through one's own fault; and omittere, to allow a thing to pass by or over, which one might have obtained): Decius amisit vitam; at non perdidit: dedit vitam, accepit patriam: amisit animam, potitus est gloriā, Auct. ad Her. 4, 44, 57: Multa amittuntur tarditie et socordiā, Att. ap. Non. 181, 21 (Trag. Rel. p. 73 Rib.):

    Simul consilium cum re amisti?

    Ter. Eun. 2, 2, 10:

    amittit vitam sensumque priorem,

    Lucr. 3, 769 et saep.:

    imperii jus amittere,

    Cic. Phil. 10, 5 fin.:

    ut totam litem aut obtineamus aut amittamus,

    id. Rosc. Com. 4, 10:

    classes optimae amissae et perditae,

    id. Verr. 1, 5, 13:

    filium amisit (sc. per mortem),

    id. Fam. 4, 6; so Tac. Agr. 6; Suet. Vesp. 3; id. Calig. 12:

    oppidum Capsam et magnam pecuniam amiserat,

    Sall. J. 97, 1:

    patrimoniis amissis,

    id. C. 37, 5:

    amittere optimates, i. e. favorem, animum eorum,

    Nep. Dion, 7, 2 Dähn.:

    patriam,

    Liv. 5, 53:

    exercitum,

    id. 8, 33:

    opera amissa (sc. incendio) restituit,

    id. 5, 7; so Suet. Claud. 6:

    si reperire vocas amittere certius,

    i. e. to know more certainly that she is lost, Ov. M. 5, 519:

    colores,

    Hor. C. 3, 5, 27; so id. S. 1, 1, 60; 2, 5, 2 (not elsewh. in Hor.).

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > amitto

  • 4 Caianus

    Gāĭus (less correctly Cāĭus;

    trisyl.,

    Cat. 10, 30; Mart. 9, 22, 12; 11, 36, 8); gen. Gāi (voc. Gāi, Mart. 10, 16, 1), m., and Gāĭa, ae, f. [for Gavius; from gaudeo], a Roman prœnomen, usu. written C.; v. the letter G. Gaia was written O, Quint. 1, 7, 28; Vel. Long. p. 2218; P. prol. p. 1502.— At marriage festivals it was customary to call the bridegroom and bride Gaius and Gaia, Fest. s. v. Gaia, p. 71; Quint. l. l.; Cic. Mur. 12 fin.
    II.
    In partic.
    A.
    An eminent jurist who lived about A.D. 110-180, author of the Institutionum Commentarii IV., which contain a systematic summary of the Roman law of family relations, of private property, and of actions; and which for generations was a standard educational work on the subject. This work was known, however, to modern scholars only by the fragments preserved in the Pandects, etc., until in 1816 Niebuhr discovered in the Chapter House of Verona a nearly complete MS. of the original work of Gaius, over which works of St. Jerome had been written. Teuffel, Gesch. d. Röm. Lit. p. 812 sqq.—
    B.
    In post-Aug. historians, esp., the emperor Gaius Caligula; hence, Gāiānus or Cāiānus, a, um, adj., of or belonging to Caligula:

    custodia,

    Sen. Tranq. 11:

    clades,

    id. ib. 14 fin.:

    expeditiones,

    Tac. 4, 15:

    nex,

    Suet. Tit. 1:

    as (because lowered in value by him),

    Stat. Sil. 4, 9, 22.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Caianus

  • 5 Gaia

    Gāĭus (less correctly Cāĭus;

    trisyl.,

    Cat. 10, 30; Mart. 9, 22, 12; 11, 36, 8); gen. Gāi (voc. Gāi, Mart. 10, 16, 1), m., and Gāĭa, ae, f. [for Gavius; from gaudeo], a Roman prœnomen, usu. written C.; v. the letter G. Gaia was written O, Quint. 1, 7, 28; Vel. Long. p. 2218; P. prol. p. 1502.— At marriage festivals it was customary to call the bridegroom and bride Gaius and Gaia, Fest. s. v. Gaia, p. 71; Quint. l. l.; Cic. Mur. 12 fin.
    II.
    In partic.
    A.
    An eminent jurist who lived about A.D. 110-180, author of the Institutionum Commentarii IV., which contain a systematic summary of the Roman law of family relations, of private property, and of actions; and which for generations was a standard educational work on the subject. This work was known, however, to modern scholars only by the fragments preserved in the Pandects, etc., until in 1816 Niebuhr discovered in the Chapter House of Verona a nearly complete MS. of the original work of Gaius, over which works of St. Jerome had been written. Teuffel, Gesch. d. Röm. Lit. p. 812 sqq.—
    B.
    In post-Aug. historians, esp., the emperor Gaius Caligula; hence, Gāiānus or Cāiānus, a, um, adj., of or belonging to Caligula:

    custodia,

    Sen. Tranq. 11:

    clades,

    id. ib. 14 fin.:

    expeditiones,

    Tac. 4, 15:

    nex,

    Suet. Tit. 1:

    as (because lowered in value by him),

    Stat. Sil. 4, 9, 22.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Gaia

  • 6 Gaianus

    Gāĭus (less correctly Cāĭus;

    trisyl.,

    Cat. 10, 30; Mart. 9, 22, 12; 11, 36, 8); gen. Gāi (voc. Gāi, Mart. 10, 16, 1), m., and Gāĭa, ae, f. [for Gavius; from gaudeo], a Roman prœnomen, usu. written C.; v. the letter G. Gaia was written O, Quint. 1, 7, 28; Vel. Long. p. 2218; P. prol. p. 1502.— At marriage festivals it was customary to call the bridegroom and bride Gaius and Gaia, Fest. s. v. Gaia, p. 71; Quint. l. l.; Cic. Mur. 12 fin.
    II.
    In partic.
    A.
    An eminent jurist who lived about A.D. 110-180, author of the Institutionum Commentarii IV., which contain a systematic summary of the Roman law of family relations, of private property, and of actions; and which for generations was a standard educational work on the subject. This work was known, however, to modern scholars only by the fragments preserved in the Pandects, etc., until in 1816 Niebuhr discovered in the Chapter House of Verona a nearly complete MS. of the original work of Gaius, over which works of St. Jerome had been written. Teuffel, Gesch. d. Röm. Lit. p. 812 sqq.—
    B.
    In post-Aug. historians, esp., the emperor Gaius Caligula; hence, Gāiānus or Cāiānus, a, um, adj., of or belonging to Caligula:

    custodia,

    Sen. Tranq. 11:

    clades,

    id. ib. 14 fin.:

    expeditiones,

    Tac. 4, 15:

    nex,

    Suet. Tit. 1:

    as (because lowered in value by him),

    Stat. Sil. 4, 9, 22.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Gaianus

  • 7 Gaius

    Gāĭus (less correctly Cāĭus;

    trisyl.,

    Cat. 10, 30; Mart. 9, 22, 12; 11, 36, 8); gen. Gāi (voc. Gāi, Mart. 10, 16, 1), m., and Gāĭa, ae, f. [for Gavius; from gaudeo], a Roman prœnomen, usu. written C.; v. the letter G. Gaia was written O, Quint. 1, 7, 28; Vel. Long. p. 2218; P. prol. p. 1502.— At marriage festivals it was customary to call the bridegroom and bride Gaius and Gaia, Fest. s. v. Gaia, p. 71; Quint. l. l.; Cic. Mur. 12 fin.
    II.
    In partic.
    A.
    An eminent jurist who lived about A.D. 110-180, author of the Institutionum Commentarii IV., which contain a systematic summary of the Roman law of family relations, of private property, and of actions; and which for generations was a standard educational work on the subject. This work was known, however, to modern scholars only by the fragments preserved in the Pandects, etc., until in 1816 Niebuhr discovered in the Chapter House of Verona a nearly complete MS. of the original work of Gaius, over which works of St. Jerome had been written. Teuffel, Gesch. d. Röm. Lit. p. 812 sqq.—
    B.
    In post-Aug. historians, esp., the emperor Gaius Caligula; hence, Gāiānus or Cāiānus, a, um, adj., of or belonging to Caligula:

    custodia,

    Sen. Tranq. 11:

    clades,

    id. ib. 14 fin.:

    expeditiones,

    Tac. 4, 15:

    nex,

    Suet. Tit. 1:

    as (because lowered in value by him),

    Stat. Sil. 4, 9, 22.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Gaius

  • 8 Iapygia

    Ĭāpyx, ygis, m., = Iapux, a son of Dœdalus, who ruled in Southern Italy (Apulia or Calabria), Plin. 3, 11, 16, § 102; Ov. M. 15, 52.—
    B.
    Transf.
    1.
    A river in the south of Italy, Plin. 3, 11, 16, § 102.—
    2. II.
    Deriv. Ĭāpygĭa, ae, f., that part of Southern Italy (Apulia or Calabria) over which Iapyx ruled, Iapygia, Plin. 3, 11, 16, § 102; Ov. M. 15, 703; Serv. Verg. G. 3, 475.—
    B.
    Derivv.
    1.
    Ĭāpygĭus, a, um, adj., Iapygian:

    Acra,

    a promontory on the eastern extremity of the Tarentine Gulf, Plin. 3, 11, 16, § 100.—
    2.
    Ĭāpyx, ygis, adj., Iapygian, also for Apulian, Calabrian:

    campus,

    Sil. 1, 51; 3, 707:

    equus,

    Verg. A. 11, 678:

    Garganus,

    id. ib. 11, 247: Daunus, as king of Apulia, Ov. M. 14, 458; 510.—
    3.
    Ĭāpygēus, i, m. (sc. ventus), the wind usually called Iapyx (v. supra), App. de Mundo, p. 63, 20.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Iapygia

  • 9 Iapygius

    Ĭāpyx, ygis, m., = Iapux, a son of Dœdalus, who ruled in Southern Italy (Apulia or Calabria), Plin. 3, 11, 16, § 102; Ov. M. 15, 52.—
    B.
    Transf.
    1.
    A river in the south of Italy, Plin. 3, 11, 16, § 102.—
    2. II.
    Deriv. Ĭāpygĭa, ae, f., that part of Southern Italy (Apulia or Calabria) over which Iapyx ruled, Iapygia, Plin. 3, 11, 16, § 102; Ov. M. 15, 703; Serv. Verg. G. 3, 475.—
    B.
    Derivv.
    1.
    Ĭāpygĭus, a, um, adj., Iapygian:

    Acra,

    a promontory on the eastern extremity of the Tarentine Gulf, Plin. 3, 11, 16, § 100.—
    2.
    Ĭāpyx, ygis, adj., Iapygian, also for Apulian, Calabrian:

    campus,

    Sil. 1, 51; 3, 707:

    equus,

    Verg. A. 11, 678:

    Garganus,

    id. ib. 11, 247: Daunus, as king of Apulia, Ov. M. 14, 458; 510.—
    3.
    Ĭāpygēus, i, m. (sc. ventus), the wind usually called Iapyx (v. supra), App. de Mundo, p. 63, 20.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Iapygius

  • 10 Iapyx

    Ĭāpyx, ygis, m., = Iapux, a son of Dœdalus, who ruled in Southern Italy (Apulia or Calabria), Plin. 3, 11, 16, § 102; Ov. M. 15, 52.—
    B.
    Transf.
    1.
    A river in the south of Italy, Plin. 3, 11, 16, § 102.—
    2. II.
    Deriv. Ĭāpygĭa, ae, f., that part of Southern Italy (Apulia or Calabria) over which Iapyx ruled, Iapygia, Plin. 3, 11, 16, § 102; Ov. M. 15, 703; Serv. Verg. G. 3, 475.—
    B.
    Derivv.
    1.
    Ĭāpygĭus, a, um, adj., Iapygian:

    Acra,

    a promontory on the eastern extremity of the Tarentine Gulf, Plin. 3, 11, 16, § 100.—
    2.
    Ĭāpyx, ygis, adj., Iapygian, also for Apulian, Calabrian:

    campus,

    Sil. 1, 51; 3, 707:

    equus,

    Verg. A. 11, 678:

    Garganus,

    id. ib. 11, 247: Daunus, as king of Apulia, Ov. M. 14, 458; 510.—
    3.
    Ĭāpygēus, i, m. (sc. ventus), the wind usually called Iapyx (v. supra), App. de Mundo, p. 63, 20.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Iapyx

  • 11 peculium

    pĕcūlĭum, ii, n. [pecus], lit., property in cattle; hence, as in early times all property consisted of cattle, in gen., property.
    I.
    Lit.
    A.
    In gen.:

    peculi sui prodigi (servi),

    Plaut. Most. 4, 1, 19:

    cupiditas peculii,

    Cic. Par. 5, 2 fin.:

    cura peculi,

    Verg. E. 1, 33 Serv.; Hor. A. P. 330.—
    B.
    In partic., private property.
    1.
    What the master of the house saves and lays by, money laid by, savings, Dig. 32, 1, 77.—
    2.
    What a wife owns as her independent property, and over which her husband has no control, a private purse, paraphernalia, Dig. 23, 3, 9, § 3.—
    3.
    That which is given by a father or master to his son, daughter, or slave, as his or her private property:

    frugi sum, nec potest peculium enumerari,

    Plaut. As. 2, 4, 91:

    adimere servis peculium,

    Varr. R. R. 1, 2, 17; 1, 17, 5:

    filii,

    Liv. 2, 41; cf. Sen. Ep. 11, 1:

    Juliam uxorem peculio concesso a patre praebitisque annuis, fraudavit,

    Suet. Tib. 50:

    cultis augere peculia servis,

    fees, Juv. 3, 189.—
    4.
    Castrense, the private property of a son acquired by military service, with the consent of his father (profecticium), or by inheritance through his mother (adventicium); then called quasi castrense, Dig. 49, 17, 5 sqq.; Paul. Sent. 3, 4; cf. Dig. 37, 6, 1.—
    5.
    = membrum virile, Plaut. Ps. 4, 7, 92; id. Most. 1, 3, 96; Petr. S. 8; Lampr. Elag. 9; cf. peculiatus.—
    II.
    Trop., that which belongs to one's self, one's own. —Of a letter:

    sine ullo ad me peculio veniet?

    without any thing for myself, Sen. Ep. 12, 9.—Of the people of lsrael:

    erunt mihi, in die quā ego facio, in peculium,

    Vulg. Mal. 3, 17.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > peculium

  • 12 Pons

    1.
    pons, ntis, m. [kindred with Sanscr. pathi, a path; Gr. patos; old Germ. phat, pfat; mod. Germ. Pfad; Angl.-Sax. padh; hence prop. a board across a ditch, brook, etc.], a bridge across a river, ditch, or marsh, between towers, etc.
    I.
    In gen.:

    pars oppidi mari disjuncta angusto, ponte rursus adjungitur et continetur,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 4, 52, §

    117: pontem in Arare faciendum curat,

    to throw a bridge over the stream, Caes. B. G. 1, 13: in Isarā, flumine maximo, ponte uno die facto, Planc. ap. Cic. Fam. 10, 15, 3:

    in Histro flumine,

    Nep. Milt. 3, 1; so,

    inicere pontem,

    Liv. 26, 6; Tac. A. 15, 19:

    flumen ponte jungere,

    Liv. 21, 45; Curt. 3, 7, 1:

    amnem ponte junxit,

    id. 4, 9, 9:

    imponere pontem flumini,

    id. 5, 1, 22:

    pontibus palude constratā,

    Hirt. B. G. 8, 14:

    pontem navibus efficere,

    Tac. A. 6, 37:

    ponte flumen transgredi,

    id. ib. 13, 39;

    also: ponte flumen transmittere,

    Plin. Ep. 8, 8; and:

    ponte flumen traicere,

    Flor. 4, 12, 22:

    interscindere pontem,

    to break down, Cic. Leg. 2, 4, 10; also,

    rescindere,

    Nep. Milt. 3, 4:

    interrumpere,

    Plaut. Cas. prol. 66; Planc. ap. Cic. Fam. 10, 23, 3:

    rumpere,

    Quint. 2, 13, 16; Tac. A. 2, 68:

    abrumpere,

    id. H. 3, 6:

    recidere,

    Curt. 4, 16, 8:

    solvere,

    Tac. A. 1, 69:

    dissolvere,

    Nep. Them. 5, 1:

    vellere,

    Verg. A. 8, 650:

    partem pontis rescindere,

    Caes. B. G. 6, 29.—Esp., as a stand for beggars, Juv. 5, 8; cf. id. 4, 116:

    aliquis de ponte,

    i. e. a beggar, id. 14, 134.— Plur.:

    plures dies efficiendis pontibus absumpti,

    a bridge of several spans, Tac. A. 2, 8; 11, 13; Planc. ap. Cic. Fam. 10, 23, 3; cf. id. ib. 10, 18, 4.—
    II.
    In partic.
    A.
    The bridge at the Comitia, over which the voters passed one by one to the septum, to deposit their votes, Cic. Att. 1, 14, 5; Auct. Her. 1, 12, 21; Ov. F. 5, 634. Hence the proverb: sexagenarios de ponte; v. sexagenarius.—
    B. C.
    A plank bridge thrown from a vessel to the shore, Verg. A. 10, 288 and 654; Liv. 21, 28.—
    D. E.
    A floor of a tower, Verg. A. 9, 530; 12, 675.—
    F. 2.
    Pons, ntis, m., a geographical proper name.
    I.
    Pons Argenteus, the modern Argens, Lepid. ap. Cic. Fam. 10, 34, 2; 10, 35.—
    II.
    Pons Campanus, Hor. S. 1, 5, 45; Plin. 14, 6, 8, § 62.—
    III.
    Aureoli, the modern Pontiruolo, Trebell. XXX. Tyr. Aureol. al.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Pons

  • 13 supra

    sū̆prā (orig. form sŭpĕrā, Lucr. 1, 429; 4, 672; 5, 1407; Cic. poët. N. D. 2, 42, 106; cf. Prisc. pp. 980 and 1001 P.), adv. and prep. [superus].
    I. A.
    Lit., of place:

    omnia haec, quae supra et subter, unum esse dixerunt,

    Cic. de Or. 3, 5, 20:

    partes eae, quae sunt infra quam id, quod devoratur, dilatantur, quae autem supra, contrahuntur,

    id. N. D. 2, 54, 135:

    magno numero jumentorum in flumine supra atquo infra constituto,

    Caes. B. C. 1, 64; and:

    et mare, quod supra, teneant, quodque alluit infra,

    Verg. A. 8, 149:

    oleum supra siet,

    Cato, R. R. 119; 101:

    cotem illam et novaculam defossam in comitio supraque impositum puteal accepimus,

    Cic. Div. 1, 17, 33:

    toto vertice supra est,

    i. e. is taller, Verg. A. 11, 683: ut letata corpora vidit Victoremque supra hostem, i. e. lying or stretched over them, Ov. M. 3, 56; cf.:

    stupet inscia supra,

    Verg. A. 7, 381.— Comp.:

    alia superius rapiuntur,

    upward, on high, Sen. Q. N. 5, 8, 3: piscina superius construenda, Pall. 1, 34, 2 (opp. subterius, Isid. 16, 8, 4).—
    B.
    Trop.
    1.
    Of time, before, formerly, previously (esp. of any thing previously said or written):

    quae supra scripta est,

    Cato, R. R. 157, 2:

    quod jam supra tibi ostendimus,

    Lucr. 1, 429:

    quae supra dixi,

    Cic. de Or. 3, 55, 208:

    quae supra scripsi,

    id. Fam. 6, 10, 2:

    quem supra deformavi,

    id. Caecin. 5, 14:

    uti supra demonstravimus,

    Caes. B. G. 2, 1:

    ut supra dixi,

    Cic. Rep. 2, 4, 9; id. Lael. 4, 15; 14, 48:

    ut supra scripsi,

    Plin. Ep. 6, 27, 5:

    de quo (filio) commemoravi supra,

    Nep. Dion, 6, 2:

    supra repetere,

    farther back, from past times, Sall. C. 5, 9; id. J. 5, 3; Tac. A. 16, 18.— Comp.:

    quantum valerent inter homines litterae, Dixi superius,

    before, farther back, Phaedr. 4, 23, 2: ut superius demonstravimus, Auct. B. Hisp. 28, 4; 34, 5.—
    2.
    Of number or measure, beyond, over, more:

    supra adjecit Aeschrio,

    offered higher, more, Cic. Verr. 2, 3, 33, § 77:

    amor tantus ut nihil supra possit,

    id. Fam. 14, 1, 4:

    ita accurate, ut nihil posset supra,

    id. Att. 13, 19, 3:

    nihil pote supra,

    Ter. Ad. 2, 3, 11:

    voltu Adeo modesto, ut nihil supra,

    id. And. 1, 1, 93; id. Eun. 3, 1, 37:

    nihil supra Deos lacesso,

    Hor. C. 2, 18, 11.—After et or aut ( poet. and post-class.):

    agrum fortasse trecentis Aut etiam supra nummorum milibus emptum,

    Hor. Ep. 2, 2, 165:

    quot illum putas annos secum tulisse? Septuaginta et supra,

    Petr. 43 fin.:

    tricena aut supra stipendia numerantes,

    Tac. A. 1, 35:

    a triginta annis et supra,

    Vulg. Num. 4, 23; 4, 30; 4, 35 (cf. II. B. 2. infra).—
    b.
    With quam, less freq. quod, above or beyond what, more than:

    saepe supra feret, quam fieri possit,

    Cic. Or. 40, 139:

    corpus patiens inediae, algoris, vigiliae, supra quam cuiquam credibile est,

    Sall. C. 5, 3; id. J. 24, 5:

    dominandi supra quam aestimari potest avidissimus,

    Aur. Vict. Epit. 1 med.:

    supra quam optari potuit,

    Amm. 17, 1, 12:

    supra quod capere possum,

    Dig. 32, 1, 28.—
    II.
    Prep. with acc., above, over.
    A.
    Lit., of place:

    si essent, qui sub terrā semper habitavissent... nec exissent umquam supra terram,

    Cic. N. D. 2, 37, 95:

    ille qui supra nos habitat,

    Plaut. Pers. 5, 2, 38:

    supra tribunal et supra praetoris caput,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 3, 33, § 77:

    supra eum locum,

    Caes. B. C. 2, 9:

    supra se in summo jugo,

    id. B. G. 1, 24:

    accubueram horā nonā... et quidem supra me Atticus, infra Verrius,

    Cic. Fam. 9, 26, 1:

    saltu supra venabula fertur,

    Verg. A. 9, 553:

    supra segetes Navigat,

    over the cornfields, Ov. M. 1, 295:

    attolli supra ceteros mortales,

    Plin. 34, 6, 12, § 27 (dub.;

    Jahn, super): supra lignum turba insilit,

    Phaedr. 1, 2, 20:

    ecce supra caput homo levis ac sordidus,

    i. e. burdensome, annoying, Cic. Q. Fr. 1, 2, 2, § 6; so,

    supra caput esse,

    to be close at hand, Sall. C. 52, 24; cf. Verg. A. 3, 194; Liv. 3, 17, 4; 4, 22, 6; Tac. H. 4, 69; Sen. Ep 108;

    rarely supra capita,

    Liv. 42, 42, 6.—
    2.
    In partic., of geographical position, above, beyond: supra Maeotis paludes, Enn. ap. Cic. Tusc. 5, 17, 49 (Epigr. v. 7, p. 163 Vahl.):

    supra Suessulam,

    Liv. 23, 32, 2:

    Syene oppidum, quod est supra Alexandriam quinque millibus stadiorum,

    Plin. 2, 73, 75, § 183;

    supra Britanniam,

    id. 2, 97, 99, § 217. —
    B.
    Trop.
    1.
    Of time, before:

    paulo supra hanc memoriam,

    Caes. B. G. 6, 19; supra septingentesimum annum, Liv. praef. § 4.—
    2.
    Of number, degree, or quantity.
    (α).
    With numbers, = plus, amplius (not in Cic. or Cæs.), over, above, beyond, more than:

    supra quattuor milia hominum orabunt ut, etc.,

    Liv. 43, 3, 2:

    caesa eo die supra milia viginti,

    id. 30, 35, 3; 3, 31, 4:

    supra septem milia hominum domos remisit,

    id. 21, 23, 6; 23, 17, 2; 23, 37, 11 sq.; 23, 49, 13; Varr. R. R. 3, 2, 17; 3, 6, 1; 3, 7, 11:

    supra duos menses sapor ejus non permanet integer,

    Col. 12, 49, 3:

    tres (cyathos),

    Hor. C. 3, 19, 15.—
    (β).
    In gen.:

    quibus solida ungula, nec supra geminos fetus,

    Plin. 11, 40, 95, § 233; cf.:

    de floribus supra dictus scripsit Theophrastus,

    besides, id. 21, 3, 9, § 13:

    hominis fortunam,

    Cic. Leg. 2, 16, 41:

    ratio supra hominem putanda est deoque tribuenda,

    id. N. D. 2, 13, 34:

    potentia, quae supra leges se esse velit,

    id. Ep. ad Brut. 1, 17, 6:

    humanam supra fortunam,

    Phaedr. 4, 24, 24:

    supra Coclites Muciosque id facinus esse,

    Liv. 2, 13, 8:

    modum,

    id. 21, 7, 7; Col. 4, 27, 4:

    vires,

    Hor. Ep. 1, 18, 22: humanam fidem Plin. 34, 7, 17, § 38: morem, Verg. G. 2, 227; Sall. C. 3, 2:

    supra belli Latini metum id quoque accesserat, quod,

    besides, Liv. 2, 18, 3.—Prov.:

    supra homines, supra ire deos pietate,

    i. e. to attain the highest degree, Verg. A. 12, 839 Heyne ad loc.—
    3.
    Sometimes to indicate that over which one is placed as superintendent (mostly postclass.):

    dispositi, quos supra somnum habebat,

    watchers, Curt. 6, 11, 3:

    qui supra bibliothecam fuerunt,

    Vitr. 7, praef. §

    5: servus supra rationes positus,

    Pseudo Quint. Decl. 353:

    SVPRA INSVLAS,

    Inscr. Orell. 721 and 2927:

    SVPRA IVMENTA,

    ib. 2870:

    SVPRA VELARIOS,

    ib. 2967:

    SVPRA COCOS,

    ib. 2827; Inscr. Grut. p. 1111, 1.—
    III.
    Compounds formed with supra are extremely rare. In late Lat. supradictus, suprafatus, suprafundo, suprajacio, supranatans, suprasedeo, etc., are found, but here supra is properly written separately as an adv.; only suprascando (v. h. v.), on account of its signif., is to be written as one word.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > supra

  • 14 Pales

    Palēs, is f.
    Палее, древнеиталийская богиня, покровительница пастухов и скота Tib, V, O etc.

    Латинско-русский словарь > Pales

  • 15 Pales

    Palēs, is, f. (zu opilio), eine der dunkeln altitalischen Feldgottheiten, die gute Bergweide gab (dah. montana, Nemes. ecl. 2, 55) und mit Inuus das große und kleinere Vieh vor Seuchen und Raubtieren schützte und es befruchtete (Ov. fast. 4, 747–774. Arnob. 3, 23); gewöhnlich als Hirtengöttin in Tempeln verehrt (pastoria, Flor. 1, 20, 2) und von Hirten unter Bäumen aufgestellt, Tibull. 2, 5, 28: nach einigen männlichen Geschlechts, Jupiters Sohn, Diener u. Meier, Mart. Cap. 1. § 50. Varro b. Serv. Verg. georg. 3, 1. Arnob. 3, 40. – lux Palis od. sacra Palis = Palilia (s. unten), Ov. fast. 4, 640 u. 820. – Dav. Palīlis, e, zur Pales gehörig, flamma, das Strohfeuer am Feste der Pales (s. unten), Ov.: festa Palilia, Tibull. u. Ov.: u. bl. Palilia (gew. Parilia geschr., s. Georges Lexik. der Lat. Wortf. S. 487), ium, n., die Palilien, ein ländliches Reinigungsfest zu Ehren der Pales, das am 21. April, dem Tage der Gründung Roms durch Hirten, gefeiert wurde. Nach vollbrachtem Opfer zündete man Haufen von Stroh od. Heu in Reihen an, trieb das Vieh hindurch u. die Hirten selbst sprangen dann nach, Varro, Cic. u.a. – u. dav. Palīlicius (Parīlicius), a, um, zu den Palilien gehörig, sidus, die Hyaden, weil sie am Feste Palilia in der Abenddämmerung verschwanden, Plin. 18, 247.

    lateinisch-deutsches > Pales

  • 16 Pales

    Palēs, is, f. (zu opilio), eine der dunkeln altitalischen Feldgottheiten, die gute Bergweide gab (dah. montana, Nemes. ecl. 2, 55) und mit Inuus das große und kleinere Vieh vor Seuchen und Raubtieren schützte und es befruchtete (Ov. fast. 4, 747-774. Arnob. 3, 23); gewöhnlich als Hirtengöttin in Tempeln verehrt (pastoria, Flor. 1, 20, 2) und von Hirten unter Bäumen aufgestellt, Tibull. 2, 5, 28: nach einigen männlichen Geschlechts, Jupiters Sohn, Diener u. Meier, Mart. Cap. 1. § 50. Varro b. Serv. Verg. georg. 3, 1. Arnob. 3, 40. – lux Palis od. sacra Palis = Palilia (s. unten), Ov. fast. 4, 640 u. 820. – Dav. Palīlis, e, zur Pales gehörig, flamma, das Strohfeuer am Feste der Pales (s. unten), Ov.: festa Palilia, Tibull. u. Ov.: u. bl. Palilia (gew. Parilia geschr., s. Georges Lexik. der Lat. Wortf. S. 487), ium, n., die Palilien, ein ländliches Reinigungsfest zu Ehren der Pales, das am 21. April, dem Tage der Gründung Roms durch Hirten, gefeiert wurde. Nach vollbrachtem Opfer zündete man Haufen von Stroh od. Heu in Reihen an, trieb das Vieh hindurch u. die Hirten selbst sprangen dann nach, Varro, Cic. u.a. – u. dav. Palīlicius (Parīlicius), a, um, zu den Palilien gehörig, sidus, die Hyaden, weil sie am Feste Palilia in der Abenddämmerung verschwanden, Plin. 18, 247.

    Ausführliches Lateinisch-deutsches Handwörterbuch > Pales

  • 17 Palēs

        Palēs is, f    [PA-], an Italian goddess of shepherds and pastures, V., O.

    Latin-English dictionary > Palēs

  • 18 Hylobius pales

    2. RUS
    4. DEU
    5. FRA

    VOCABULARIUM NOMINUM ANIMALIUM QUINQUELINGUE > Hylobius pales

  • 19 Pales

    2. RUS
    3. ENG
    4. DEU
    5. FRA

    VOCABULARIUM NOMINUM ANIMALIUM QUINQUELINGUE > Pales

  • 20 Pales

    Păles, is, f. (m., Varr. ap. Serv. ad Verg. G. 3, 1; Mart. Cap. 1, § 50; Arn. 3, 113), the tutelary deity of shepherds and cattle: Pales dicebatur dea pastorum, cujus festa Palilia dicebantur;

    vel, ut alii volunt, dicta Parilia, quod pro partu pecoris eidem sacra fiebant,

    Fest. p. 222 Müll.:

    ipsa Pales agros... reliquit,

    Verg. E. 5, 35:

    silvicolam tepido lacte precare Palem,

    Ov. F. 4, 746; Tib. 1, 1, 14 (36):

    fecunda,

    Calp. Ecl. 7, 22.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Pales

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