Translation: from latin

for the sixth time

  • 1 sextum

        sextum adv.    [sextus], for the sixth time: sextum consul, L.

    Latin-English dictionary > sextum

  • 2 Sex

    1.
    sextus, a, um, num. ord. adj. [sex], the sixth, Plaut. Ps. 4, 2, 5:

    sextus ab urbe lapis,

    Ov. F. 2, 682:

    sextus decimus ab Hercule,

    Vell. 1, 6, 5:

    hic annus sextus, postquam ei rei operam damus,

    Plaut. Men. 2, 1, 9; id. Most. 4, 2, 41:

    sexto decimo anno,

    Cic. Rep. 2, 33, 57:

    sextus locus est, etc.,

    id. Inv. 1, 53, 102:

    sextus decimus (locus),

    id. ib. 1, 56, 109; Tac. A. 1, 17:

    sexta decima legio,

    id. ib. 1, 37 al.:

    sexta decima (sc. hora),

    Mart. Cap. 6, § 696;

    for which also, in one word: post sextumdecimum annum,

    the sixteenth, Liv. 30, 19:

    abdicat die sextodecimo,

    id. 4, 34:

    sextodecimo Calendas Jan.,

    Col. 11, 2, 94.—In gram.:

    sextus casus,

    the ablative case, Quint. 1, 4, 26.—
    B.
    Advv.
    1.
    sextum, for the sixth time:

    in M. Catonis quartā Origine ita perscriptum est: Carthaginienses sextum de foedere decessere. Id verbum significat, quinquies ante eos fecisse contra foedus, et tum sextum,

    Gell. 10, 1, 10:

    sextum consul,

    Cic. Pis. 9, 20.—
    * 2.
    sextō, six times: lavit ad diem septimo aestate vel sexto, Treb. Gall. 17.
    2.
    Sextus (abbrev. Sex.), i, m., a Roman proper name.
    1.
    Sex. Roscius Amerinus, Cic. Rosc. Am. 6, 15.—
    2.
    Sex. Pompeius, Cic. Att. 12, 37, 4.—In a play upon 1. sextus, Quint. 6, 3, 86; v. annalis fin.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Sex

  • 3 sexiens

    sexĭes or - ĭens, num. adv. [sex].
    I.
    Six times:

    hostis sexies victus,

    Liv. 4, 32:

    id sexies evenit per annos,

    Plin. 18, 16, 43, § 146:

    hoc sexies ducendum est,

    is to be taken six times, to be multiplied by six, Col. 5, 2 fin.
    * II.
    For sextum, for the sixth time:

    Mario sexies Valerioque Flacco Coss.,

    Vell. 1, 15, 5.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > sexiens

  • 4 sexies

    sexĭes or - ĭens, num. adv. [sex].
    I.
    Six times:

    hostis sexies victus,

    Liv. 4, 32:

    id sexies evenit per annos,

    Plin. 18, 16, 43, § 146:

    hoc sexies ducendum est,

    is to be taken six times, to be multiplied by six, Col. 5, 2 fin.
    * II.
    For sextum, for the sixth time:

    Mario sexies Valerioque Flacco Coss.,

    Vell. 1, 15, 5.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > sexies

  • 5 sextum

    1.
    sextus, a, um, num. ord. adj. [sex], the sixth, Plaut. Ps. 4, 2, 5:

    sextus ab urbe lapis,

    Ov. F. 2, 682:

    sextus decimus ab Hercule,

    Vell. 1, 6, 5:

    hic annus sextus, postquam ei rei operam damus,

    Plaut. Men. 2, 1, 9; id. Most. 4, 2, 41:

    sexto decimo anno,

    Cic. Rep. 2, 33, 57:

    sextus locus est, etc.,

    id. Inv. 1, 53, 102:

    sextus decimus (locus),

    id. ib. 1, 56, 109; Tac. A. 1, 17:

    sexta decima legio,

    id. ib. 1, 37 al.:

    sexta decima (sc. hora),

    Mart. Cap. 6, § 696;

    for which also, in one word: post sextumdecimum annum,

    the sixteenth, Liv. 30, 19:

    abdicat die sextodecimo,

    id. 4, 34:

    sextodecimo Calendas Jan.,

    Col. 11, 2, 94.—In gram.:

    sextus casus,

    the ablative case, Quint. 1, 4, 26.—
    B.
    Advv.
    1.
    sextum, for the sixth time:

    in M. Catonis quartā Origine ita perscriptum est: Carthaginienses sextum de foedere decessere. Id verbum significat, quinquies ante eos fecisse contra foedus, et tum sextum,

    Gell. 10, 1, 10:

    sextum consul,

    Cic. Pis. 9, 20.—
    * 2.
    sextō, six times: lavit ad diem septimo aestate vel sexto, Treb. Gall. 17.
    2.
    Sextus (abbrev. Sex.), i, m., a Roman proper name.
    1.
    Sex. Roscius Amerinus, Cic. Rosc. Am. 6, 15.—
    2.
    Sex. Pompeius, Cic. Att. 12, 37, 4.—In a play upon 1. sextus, Quint. 6, 3, 86; v. annalis fin.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > sextum

  • 6 Sextus

    1.
    sextus, a, um, num. ord. adj. [sex], the sixth, Plaut. Ps. 4, 2, 5:

    sextus ab urbe lapis,

    Ov. F. 2, 682:

    sextus decimus ab Hercule,

    Vell. 1, 6, 5:

    hic annus sextus, postquam ei rei operam damus,

    Plaut. Men. 2, 1, 9; id. Most. 4, 2, 41:

    sexto decimo anno,

    Cic. Rep. 2, 33, 57:

    sextus locus est, etc.,

    id. Inv. 1, 53, 102:

    sextus decimus (locus),

    id. ib. 1, 56, 109; Tac. A. 1, 17:

    sexta decima legio,

    id. ib. 1, 37 al.:

    sexta decima (sc. hora),

    Mart. Cap. 6, § 696;

    for which also, in one word: post sextumdecimum annum,

    the sixteenth, Liv. 30, 19:

    abdicat die sextodecimo,

    id. 4, 34:

    sextodecimo Calendas Jan.,

    Col. 11, 2, 94.—In gram.:

    sextus casus,

    the ablative case, Quint. 1, 4, 26.—
    B.
    Advv.
    1.
    sextum, for the sixth time:

    in M. Catonis quartā Origine ita perscriptum est: Carthaginienses sextum de foedere decessere. Id verbum significat, quinquies ante eos fecisse contra foedus, et tum sextum,

    Gell. 10, 1, 10:

    sextum consul,

    Cic. Pis. 9, 20.—
    * 2.
    sextō, six times: lavit ad diem septimo aestate vel sexto, Treb. Gall. 17.
    2.
    Sextus (abbrev. Sex.), i, m., a Roman proper name.
    1.
    Sex. Roscius Amerinus, Cic. Rosc. Am. 6, 15.—
    2.
    Sex. Pompeius, Cic. Att. 12, 37, 4.—In a play upon 1. sextus, Quint. 6, 3, 86; v. annalis fin.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Sextus

  • 7 QUANDO (WHEN, TIME)

    время, когда; шестая из десяти аристотелевских категорий.

    Латинский словарь средневековых философских терминов > QUANDO (WHEN, TIME)

  • 8 ab

    ăb, ā, abs, prep. with abl. This IndoEuropean particle (Sanscr. apa or ava, Etr. av, Gr. upo, Goth. af, Old Germ. aba, New Germ. ab, Engl. of, off) has in Latin the following forms: ap, af, ab (av), au-, a, a; aps, abs, as-. The existence of the oldest form, ap, is proved by the oldest and best MSS. analogous to the prep. apud, the Sanscr. api, and Gr. epi, and by the weakened form af, which, by the rule of historical grammar and the nature of the Latin letter f, can be derived only from ap, not from ab. The form af, weakened from ap, also very soon became obsolete. There are but five examples of it in inscriptions, at the end of the sixth and in the course of the seventh century B. C., viz.:

    AF VOBEIS,

    Inscr. Orell. 3114;

    AF MVRO,

    ib. 6601;

    AF CAPVA,

    ib. 3308;

    AF SOLO,

    ib. 589;

    AF LYCO,

    ib. 3036 ( afuolunt =avolant, Paul. ex Fest. p. 26 Mull., is only a conjecture). In the time of Cicero this form was regarded as archaic, and only here and there used in account-books; v. Cic. Or. 47, 158 (where the correct reading is af, not abs or ab), and cf. Ritschl, Monum. Epigr. p. 7 sq.—The second form of this preposition, changed from ap, was ab, which has become the principal form and the one most generally used through all periods—and indeed the only oue used before all vowels and h; here and there also before some consonants, particularly l, n, r, and s; rarely before c, j, d, t; and almost never before the labials p, b, f, v, or before m, such examples as ab Massiliensibus, Caes. B. C. 1, 35, being of the most rare occurrence.—By changing the b of ab through v into u, the form au originated, which was in use only in the two compounds aufero and aufugio for abfero, ab-fugio; aufuisse for afuisse, in Cod. Medic. of Tac. A. 12, 17, is altogether unusual. Finally, by dropping the b of ab, and lengthening the a, ab was changed into a, which form, together with ab, predominated through all periods of the Latin language, and took its place before all consonants in the later years of Cicero, and after him almoet exclusively.—By dropping the b without lengthening the a, ab occurs in the form a- in the two compounds a-bio and a-perio, q. v.—On the other hand, instead of reducing ap to a and a, a strengthened collateral form, aps, was made by adding to ap the letter s (also used in particles, as in ex, mox, vix). From the first, aps was used only before the letters c, q, t, and was very soon changed into abs (as ap into ab):

    abs chorago,

    Plaut. Pers. 1, 3, 79 (159 Ritschl):

    abs quivis,

    Ter. Ad. 2, 3, 1:

    abs terra,

    Cato, R. R. 51;

    and in compounds: aps-cessero,

    Plaut. Trin. 3, 1, 24 (625 R.); id. ib. 3, 2, 84 (710 R): abs-condo, abs-que, abs-tineo, etc. The use of abs was confined almost exclusively to the combination abs te during the whole ante-classic period, and with Cicero till about the year 700 A. U. C. (=B. C. 54). After that time Cicero evidently hesitates between abs te and a te, but during the last five or six years of his life a te became predominant in all his writings, even in his letters; consequently abs te appears but rarely in later authors, as in Liv. 10, 19, 8; 26, 15, 12;

    and who, perhaps, also used abs conscendentibus,

    id. 28, 37, 2; v. Drakenb. ad. h. l. (Weissenb. ab).—Finally abs, in consequence of the following p, lost its b, and became ds- in the three compounds aspello, as-porto, and as-pernor (for asspernor); v. these words.—The late Lat. verb abbrevio may stand for adbrevio, the d of ad being assimilated to the following b.The fundamental signification of ab is departure from some fixed point (opp. to ad. which denotes motion to a point).
    I.
    In space, and,
    II.
    Fig., in time and other relations, in which the idea of departure from some point, as from source and origin, is included; Engl. from, away from, out of; down from; since, after; by, at, in, on, etc.
    I.
    Lit., in space: ab classe ad urbem tendunt, Att. ap. Non. 495, 22 (Trag. Rel. p. 177 Rib.):

    Caesar maturat ab urbe proficisci,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 7:

    fuga ab urbe turpissima,

    Cic. Att. 7, 21:

    ducite ab urbe domum, ducite Daphnim,

    Verg. E. 8, 68. Cicero himself gives the difference between ab and ex thus: si qui mihi praesto fuerit cum armatis hominibus extra meum fundum et me introire prohibuerit, non ex eo, sed ab ( from, away from) eo loco me dejecerit....Unde dejecti Galli? A Capitolio. Unde, qui cum Graccho fucrunt? Ex Capitolio, etc., Cic. Caecin. 30, 87; cf. Diom. p. 408 P., and a similar distinction between ad and in under ad.—Ellipt.: Diogenes Alexandro roganti, ut diceret, si quid opus esset: Nunc quidem paululum, inquit, a sole, a little out of the sun, Cic. Tusc. 5, 32, 92. —Often joined with usque:

    illam (mulierem) usque a mari supero Romam proficisci,

    all the way from, Cic. Clu. 68, 192; v. usque, I.—And with ad, to denote the space passed over: siderum genus ab ortu ad occasum commeant, from... to, Cic. N. D. 2, 19 init.; cf. ab... in:

    venti a laevo latere in dextrum, ut sol, ambiunt,

    Plin. 2, 47, 48, § 128.
    b.
    Sometimes with names of cities and small islands, or with domus (instead of the usual abl.), partie., in militnry and nautieal language, to denote the marching of soldiers, the setting out of a flcet, or the departure of the inhabitants from some place:

    oppidum ab Aenea fugiente a Troja conditum,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 4, 33:

    quemadmodum (Caesar) a Gergovia discederet,

    Caes. B. G. 7, 43 fin.; so id. ib. 7, 80 fin.; Sall. J. 61; 82; 91; Liv. 2, 33, 6 al.; cf.:

    ab Arimino M. Antonium cum cohortibus quinque Arretium mittit,

    Caes. B. C. 1, 11 fin.; and:

    protinus a Corfinio in Siciliam miserat,

    id. ib. 1, 25, 2:

    profecti a domo,

    Liv. 40, 33, 2;

    of setting sail: cum exercitus vestri numquam a Brundisio nisi hieme summa transmiserint,

    Cic. Imp. Pomp. 12, 32; so id. Fam. 15, 3, 2; Caes. B. C. 3, 23; 3, 24 fin.:

    classe qua advecti ab domo fuerant,

    Liv. 8, 22, 6;

    of citizens: interim ab Roma legatos venisse nuntiatum est,

    Liv. 21, 9, 3; cf.:

    legati ab Orico ad M. Valerium praetorem venerunt,

    id. 24, 40, 2.
    c.
    Sometimes with names of persons or with pronouns: pestem abige a me, Enn. ap. Cic. Ac. 2, 28, 89 (Trag. v. 50 Vahl.):

    Quasi ad adulescentem a patre ex Seleucia veniat,

    Plaut. Trin. 3, 3, 41; cf.:

    libertus a Fuflis cum litteris ad Hermippum venit,

    Cic. Fl. 20, 47:

    Nigidium a Domitio Capuam venisse,

    id. Att. 7, 24:

    cum a vobis discessero,

    id. Sen. 22:

    multa merces tibi defluat ab Jove Neptunoque,

    Hor. C. 1, 28, 29 al. So often of a person instead of his house, lodging, etc.: videat forte hic te a patre aliquis exiens, from the father, i. e. from his house, Ter. Heaut. 2, 2, 6:

    so a fratre,

    id. Phorm. 5, 1, 5:

    a Pontio,

    Cic. Att. 5, 3 fin.:

    ab ea,

    Ter. And. 1, 3, 21; and so often: a me, a nobis, a se, etc., from my, our, his house, etc., Plaut. Stich. 5, 1, 7; Ter. Heaut. 3, 2, 50; Cic. Att. 4, 9, 1 al.
    B.
    Transf., without the idea of motion. To designate separation or distance, with the verbs abesse, distare, etc., and with the particles longe, procul, prope, etc.
    1.
    Of separation:

    ego te afuisse tam diu a nobis dolui,

    Cic. Fam. 2, 1, 2:

    abesse a domo paulisper maluit,

    id. Verr. 2, 4, 18, § 39:

    tum Brutus ab Roma aberat,

    Sall. C. 40, 5:

    absint lacerti ab stabulis,

    Verg. G. 4, 14.—
    2.
    Of distance:

    quot milia fundus suus abesset ab urbe,

    Cic. Caecin. 10, 28; cf.:

    nos in castra properabamus, quae aberant bidui,

    id. Att. 5, 16 fin.; and:

    hic locus aequo fere spatio ab castris Ariovisti et Caesaris aberat,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 43, 1:

    terrae ab hujusce terrae, quam nos incolimus, continuatione distantes,

    Cic. N. D. 2, 66, 164:

    non amplius pedum milibus duobus ab castris castra distabant,

    Caes. B. C. 1, 82, 3; cf. id. lb. 1, 3, 103.—With adverbs: annos multos longinque ab domo bellum gerentes, Enn. ap. Non. 402, 3 (Trag. v. 103 Vahl.):

    cum domus patris a foro longe abesset,

    Cic. Cael. 7, 18 fin.; cf.:

    qui fontes a quibusdam praesidiis aberant longius,

    Caes. B. C. 3, 49, 5:

    quae procul erant a conspectu imperii,

    Cic. Agr. 2, 32, 87; cf.:

    procul a castris hostes in collibus constiterunt,

    Caes. B. G. 5, 17, 1; and:

    tu procul a patria Alpinas nives vides,

    Verg. E. 10, 46 (procul often also with simple abl.;

    v. procul): cum esset in Italia bellum tam prope a Sicilia, tamen in Sicilia non fuit,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 5, 2, § 6; cf.:

    tu apud socrum tuam prope a meis aedibus sedebas,

    id. Pis. 11, 26; and:

    tam prope ab domo detineri,

    id. Verr. 2, 2, 3, § 6.—So in Caesar and Livy, with numerals to designate the measure of the distance:

    onerariae naves, quae ex eo loco ab milibus passuum octo vento tenebatur,

    eight miles distant, Caes. B. G. 4, 22, 4; and without mentioning the terminus a quo: ad castra contenderunt, et ab milibus passunm minus duobus castra posuerunt, less than two miles off or distant, id. ib. 2, 7, 3; so id. ib. 2, 5, 32; 6, 7, 3; id. B. C. 1, 65; Liv. 38, 20, 2 (for which:

    duo milia fere et quingentos passus ab hoste posuerunt castra,

    id. 37, 38, 5). —
    3.
    To denote the side or direction from which an object is viewed in its local relations,=a parte, at, on, in: utrum hacin feriam an ab laeva latus? Enn. ap. Plaut. Cist. 3, 10 (Trag. v. 38 Vahl.); cf.:

    picus et cornix ab laeva, corvos, parra ab dextera consuadent,

    Plaut. As. 2, 1, 12: clamore ab ea parte audito. on this side, Caes. B. G. 3, 26, 4: Gallia Celtica attingit ab Sequanis et Helvetiis flumen Rhenum, on the side of the Sequani, i. e. their country, id. ib. 1, 1, 5:

    pleraque Alpium ab Italia sicut breviora ita arrectiora sunt,

    on the Italian side, Liv. 21, 35, 11:

    non eadem diligentia ab decumuna porta castra munita,

    at the main entrance, Caes. B. G. 3, 25 fin.:

    erat a septentrionibus collis,

    on the north, id. ib. 7, 83, 2; so, ab oriente, a meridie, ab occasu; a fronte, a latere, a tergo, etc. (v. these words).
    II.
    Fig.
    A.
    In time.
    1.
    From a [p. 3] point of time, without reference to the period subsequently elapsed. After:

    Exul ab octava Marius bibit,

    Juv. 1,40:

    mulieres jam ab re divin[adot ] adparebunt domi,

    immediately after the sucrifice, Plaut. Poen. 3, 3, 4:

    Caesar ab decimae legionis cohortatione ad dextrum cornu profectus,

    Caes. B. G. 2, 25, 1:

    ab hac contione legati missi sunt,

    immediately after, Liv. 24, 22, 6; cf. id. 28, 33, 1; 40, 47, 8; 40, 49, 1 al.:

    ab eo magistratu,

    after this office, Sall. J. 63, 5:

    a summa spe novissima exspectabat,

    after the greatest hope, Tac. A. 6, 50 fin. —Strengthened by the adverbs primum, confestim, statim, protinus, or the adj. recens, immediately after, soon after:

    ut primum a tuo digressu Romam veni,

    Cic. Att. 1, 5, 4; so Suet. Tib. 68:

    confestim a proelio expugnatis hostium castris,

    Liv. 30, 36, 1:

    statim a funere,

    Suet. Caes. 85;

    and followed by statim: ab itinere statim,

    id. ib. 60:

    protinus ab adoptione,

    Vell. 2, 104, 3:

    Homerus qui recens ab illorum actate fuit,

    soon after their time, Cic. N. D. 3, 5; so Varr. R. R. 2, 8, 2; Verg. A. 6, 450 al. (v. also primum, confestim, etc.).—

    Sometimes with the name of a person or place, instead of an action: ibi mihi tuae litterae binae redditae sunt tertio abs te die,

    i. e. after their departure from you, Cic. Att. 5, 3, 1: in Italiam perventum est quinto mense a Carthagine Nov[adot ], i. e. after leaving (=postquam a Carthagine profecti sunt), Liv. 21, 38, 1:

    secundo Punico (bello) Scipionis classis XL. die a securi navigavit,

    i. e. after its having been built, Plin. 16, 39, 74, § 192. —Hence the poct. expression: ab his, after this (cf. ek toutôn), i. e. after these words, hereupon, Ov. M. 3, 273; 4, 329; 8, 612; 9, 764.
    2.
    With reference to a subsequent period. From, since, after:

    ab hora tertia bibebatur,

    from the third hour, Cic. Phil. 2, 41:

    infinito ex tempore, non ut antea, ab Sulla et Pompeio consulibus,

    since the consulship of, id. Agr. 2, 21, 56:

    vixit ab omni aeternitate,

    from all eternity, id. Div. 1, 51, 115:

    cum quo a condiscipulatu vivebat conjunctissime,

    Nep. Att. 5, 3:

    in Lycia semper a terrae motu XL. dies serenos esse,

    after an earthquake, Plin. 2, 96, 98, § 211 al.:

    centesima lux est haec ab interitu P. Clodii,

    since the death of, Cic. Mil. 35, 98; cf.:

    cujus a morte quintus hic et tricesimus annus est,

    id. Sen. 6, 19; and:

    ab incenso Capitolio illum esse vigesumiun annum,

    since, Sall. C. 47, 2:

    diebus triginta, a qua die materia caesa est,

    Caes. B. C. 1, 36.—Sometimes joined with usque and inde:

    quod augures omnes usque ab Romulo decreverunt,

    since the time of, Cic. Vat. 8, 20:

    jam inde ab infelici pugna ceciderant animi,

    from the very beginning of, Liv. 2, 65 fin. —Hence the adverbial expressions ab initio, a principio, a primo, at, in, or from the beginning, at first; v. initium, principium, primus. Likewise ab integro, anew, afresh; v. integer.—Ab... ad, from (a time)... to:

    ab hora octava ad vesperum secreto collocuti sumus,

    Cic. Att. 7, 8, 4; cf.:

    cum ab hora septima ad vesperum pugnatum sit,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 26, 2; and:

    a quo tempore ad vos consules anni sunt septingenti octoginta unus,

    Vell. 1, 8, 4; and so in Plautus strengthened by usque:

    pugnata pugnast usque a mane ad vesperum,

    from morning to evening, Plaut. Am. 1, 1, 97; id. Most. 3, 1, 3; 3, 2, 80.—Rarely ab... in: Romani ab sole orto in multum diei stetere in acie, from... till late in the day, Liv. 27, 2, 9; so Col. 2, 10, 17; Plin. 2, 31, 31, § 99; 2, 103, 106, § 229; 4, 12, 26, § 89.
    b.
    Particularly with nouns denoting a time of life:

    qui homo cum animo inde ab ineunte aetate depugnat suo,

    from an early age, from early youth, Plaut. Trin. 2, 2, 24; so Cic. Off. 2, 13, 44 al.:

    mihi magna cum co jam inde a pueritia fuit semper famillaritas,

    Ter. Heaut. 1, 2, 9; so,

    a pueritia,

    Cic. Tusc. 2, 11, 27 fin.; id. Fam. 5, 8, 4:

    jam inde ab adulescentia,

    Ter. Ad. 1, 1, 16:

    ab adulescentia,

    Cic. Rep. 2, 1:

    jam a prima adulescentia,

    id. Fam. 1, 9, 23:

    ab ineunte adulescentia,

    id. ib. 13, 21, 1; cf.

    followed by ad: usque ad hanc aetatem ab incunte adulescentia,

    Plaut. Trin. 2, 2, 20:

    a primis temporibus aetatis,

    Cic. Fam. 4, 3, 3:

    a teneris unguiculis,

    from childhood, id. ib. 1, 6, 2:

    usque a toga pura,

    id. Att. 7, 8, 5:

    jam inde ab incunabulis,

    Liv. 4, 36, 5:

    a prima lanugine,

    Suet. Oth. 12:

    viridi ab aevo,

    Ov. Tr. 4, 10, 17 al.;

    rarely of animals: ab infantia,

    Plin. 10, 63, 83, § 182.—Instead of the nom. abstr. very often (like the Greek ek paioôn, etc.) with concrete substantives: a pucro, ab adulescente, a parvis, etc., from childhood, etc.:

    qui olim a puero parvulo mihi paedagogus fuerat,

    Plaut. Merc. 1, 1, 90; so,

    a pausillo puero,

    id. Stich. 1, 3, 21:

    a puero,

    Cic. Ac. 2, 36, 115; id. Fam. 13, 16, 4 (twice) al.:

    a pueris,

    Cic. Tusc. 1, 24, 57; id. de Or. 1, 1, 2 al.:

    ab adulescente,

    id. Quint. 3, 12:

    ab infante,

    Col. 1, 8, 2:

    a parva virgine,

    Cat. 66, 26 al. —Likewise and in the same sense with adject.: a parvo, from a little child, or childhood, Liv. 1, 39, 6 fin.; cf.:

    a parvis,

    Ter. And. 3, 3, 7; Cic. Leg. 2, 4, 9:

    a parvulo,

    Ter. And. 1, 1, 8; id. Ad. 1, 1, 23; cf.:

    ab parvulis,

    Caes. B. G. 6, 21, 3:

    ab tenero,

    Col. 5, 6, 20;

    and rarely of animals: (vacca) a bima aut trima fructum ferre incipit,

    Varr. R. R. 2, 1, 13.
    B.
    In other relations in which the idea of going forth, proceeding, from something is included.
    1.
    In gen. to denote departure, separation, deterring, avoiding, intermitting, etc., or distance, difference, etc., of inanimate or abstract things. From: jus atque aecum se a malis spernit procul, Enn. ap. Non. 399, 10 (Trag. v. 224 Vahl.):

    suspitionem et culpam ut ab se segregent,

    Plaut. Trin. 1, 2, 42:

    qui discessum animi a corpore putent esse mortem,

    Cic. Tusc. 1, 9, 18:

    hic ab artificio suo non recessit,

    id. ib. 1, 10, 20 al.:

    quod si exquiratur usque ab stirpe auctoritas,

    Plaut. Trin. 1, 2, 180:

    condicionem quam ab te peto,

    id. ib. 2, 4, 87; cf.:

    mercedem gloriae flagitas ab iis, quorum, etc.,

    Cic. Tusc. 1, 15, 34:

    si quid ab illo acceperis,

    Plaut. Trin. 2, 2, 90:

    quae (i. e. antiquitas) quo propius aberat ab ortu et divina progenie,

    Cic. Tusc. 1, 12, 26:

    ab defensione desistere,

    Caes. B. C. 2, 12, 4:

    ne quod tempus ab opere intermitteretur,

    id. B. G. 7, 24, 2:

    ut homines adulescentis a dicendi studio deterream,

    Cic. de Or. 1, 25, 117, etc.—Of distance (in order, rank, mind, or feeling):

    qui quartus ab Arcesila fuit,

    the fourth in succession from, Cic. Ac. 1, 12, 46:

    tu nunc eris alter ab illo,

    next after him, Verg. E. 5, 49; cf.:

    Aiax, heros ab Achille secundus,

    next in rank to, Hor. S. 2, 3, 193:

    quid hoc ab illo differt,

    from, Cic. Caecin. 14, 39; cf.:

    hominum vita tantum distat a victu et cultu bestiarum,

    id. Off. 2, 4, 15; and:

    discrepare ab aequitate sapientiam,

    id. Rep. 3, 9 fin. (v. the verbs differo, disto, discrepo, dissideo, dissentio, etc.):

    quae non aliena esse ducerem a dignitate,

    Cic. Fam. 4, 7:

    alieno a te animo fuit,

    id. Deiot. 9, 24 (v. alienus). —So the expression ab re (qs. aside from the matter, profit; cf. the opposite, in rem), contrary to one's profit, to a loss, disadvantageous (so in the affirmative very rare and only ante-class.):

    subdole ab re consulit,

    Plaut. Trin. 2, 1, 12; cf. id. Capt. 2, 2, 88; more frequently and class. (but not with Cicero) in the negative, non, haud, ab re, not without advantage or profit, not useless or unprofitable, adcantageous:

    haut est ab re aucupis,

    Plaut. As. 1, 3, 71:

    non ab re esse Quinctii visum est,

    Liv. 35, 32, 6; so Plin. 27, 8, 35; 31, 3, 26; Suet. Aug. 94; id. Dom. 11; Gell. 18, 14 fin.; App. Dogm. Plat. 3, p. 31, 22 al. (but in Ter. Ad. 5, 3, 44, ab re means with respect to the money matter).
    2.
    In partic.
    a.
    To denote an agent from whom an action proceeds, or by whom a thing is done or takes place. By, and in archaic and solemn style, of. So most frequently with pass. or intrans. verbs with pass. signif., when the active object is or is considered as a living being: Laudari me abs te, a laudato viro, Naev. ap. Cic. Tusc. 4, 31, 67: injuria abs te afficior, Enn. ap. Auct. Her. 2, 24, 38:

    a patre deductus ad Scaevolam,

    Cic. Lael. 1, 1:

    ut tamquam a praesentibus coram haberi sermo videretur,

    id. ib. 1, 3:

    disputata ab eo,

    id. ib. 1, 4 al.:

    illa (i. e. numerorum ac vocum vis) maxime a Graecia vetere celebrata,

    id. de Or. 3, 51, 197:

    ita generati a natura sumus,

    id. Off. 1, 29, 103; cf.:

    pars mundi damnata a rerum natura,

    Plin. 4, 12, 26, § 88:

    niagna adhibita cura est a providentia deorum,

    Cic. N. D. 2, 51 al. —With intrans. verbs:

    quae (i. e. anima) calescit ab eo spiritu,

    is warmed by this breath, Cic. N. D. 2, 55, 138; cf. Ov. M. 1, 417: (mare) qua a sole collucet, Cic. Ac. 2, 105:

    salvebis a meo Cicerone,

    i. e. young Cicero sends his compliments to you, id. Att. 6, 2 fin.:

    a quibus (Atheniensibus) erat profectus,

    i. e. by whose command, Nep. Milt. 2, 3:

    ne vir ab hoste cadat,

    Ov. H. 9, 36 al. —A substantive or adjective often takes the place of the verb (so with de, q. v.):

    levior est plaga ab amico quam a debitore,

    Cic. Fam. 9, 16, 7; cf.:

    a bestiis ictus, morsus, impetus,

    id. Off. 2, 6, 19:

    si calor est a sole,

    id. N. D. 2, 52:

    ex iis a te verbis (for a te scriptis),

    id. Att. 16, 7, 5:

    metu poenae a Romanis,

    Liv. 32, 23, 9:

    bellum ingens a Volscis et Aequis,

    id. 3, 22, 2:

    ad exsolvendam fldem a consule,

    id. 27, 5, 6.—With an adj.:

    lassus ab equo indomito,

    Hor. S. 2, 2, 10:

    Murus ab ingenic notior ille tuo,

    Prop. 5, 1, 126:

    tempus a nostris triste malis,

    time made sad by our misfortunes, Ov. Tr. 4, 3, 36.—Different from per:

    vulgo occidebantur: per quos et a quibus?

    by whom and upon whose orders? Cic. Rosc. Am. 29, 80 (cf. id. ib. 34, 97: cujus consilio occisus sit, invenio; cujus manu sit percussus, non laboro); so,

    ab hoc destitutus per Thrasybulum (i. e. Thrasybulo auctore),

    Nep. Alc. 5, 4.—Ambiguity sometimes arises from the fact that the verb in the pass. would require ab if used in the active:

    si postulatur a populo,

    if the people demand it, Cic. Off. 2, 17, 58, might also mean, if it is required of the people; on the contrary: quod ab eo (Lucullo) laus imperatoria non admodum exspectabatur, not since he did not expect military renown, but since they did not expect military renown from him, Cic. Ac. 2, 1, 2, and so often; cf. Rudd. II. p. 213. (The use of the active dative, or dative of the agent, instead of ab with the pass., is well known, Zumpt, § 419. It is very seldom found in prose writers of the golden age of Roman liter.; with Cic. sometimes joined with the participles auditus, cognitus, constitutus, perspectus, provisus, susceptus; cf. Halm ad Cic. Imp. Pomp. 24, 71, and ad ejusdem, Cat. 1, 7 fin.; but freq. at a later period; e. g. in Pliny, in Books 2-4 of H. N., more than twenty times; and likewise in Tacitus seventeen times. Vid. the passages in Nipperd. ad Tac. A. 2, 49.) Far more unusual is the simple abl. in the designation of persons:

    deseror conjuge,

    Ov. H. 12, 161; so id. ib. 5, 75; id. M. 1, 747; Verg. A. 1, 274; Hor. C. 2, 4, 9; 1, 6, 2;

    and in prose,

    Quint. 3, 4, 2; Sen. Contr. 2, 1; Curt. 6, 7, 8; cf. Rudd. II. p. 212; Zumpt ad Quint. V. p. 122 Spalding.—Hence the adverbial phrase a se=uph heautou, sua sponte, of one's own uccord, spontaneously:

    ipsum a se oritur et sua sponte nascitur,

    Cic. Fin. 2, 24, 78:

    (urna) ab se cantat quoja sit,

    Plaut. Rud. 2, 5, 21 (al. eapse; cf. id. Men. 1, 2, 66); so Col. 11, 1, 5; Liv. 44, 33, 6.
    b.
    With names of towns to denote origin, extraction, instead of gentile adjectives. From, of:

    pastores a Pergamide,

    Varr. R. R. 2, 2, 1:

    Turnus ab Aricia,

    Liv. 1, 50, 3 (for which Aricinus, id. 1, 51, 1):

    obsides dant trecentos principum a Cora atque Pometia liberos,

    Liv. 2, 22, 2; and poet.: O longa mundi servator ab Alba, Auguste, thou who art descended from the old Alban race of kings (=oriundus, or ortus regibus Albanis), Prop. 5, 6, 37.
    c.
    In giving the etymology of a name: eam rem (sc. legem, Gr. nomon) illi Graeco putant nomine a suum cuique tribuendo appellatam, ego nostro a legendo, Cic. Leg. 1, 6, 19: annum intervallum regni fuit: id ab re... interregnum appellatum, Liv. 1, 17, 6:

    (sinus maris) ab nomine propinquae urbis Ambracius appellatus,

    id. 38, 4, 3; and so Varro in his Ling. Lat., and Pliny, in Books 1-5 of H. N., on almost every page. (Cf. also the arts. ex and de.)
    d.
    With verbs of beginning and repeating: a summo bibere, in Plaut. to drink in succession from the one at the head of the table:

    da, puere, ab summo,

    Plaut. As. 5, 2, 41; so,

    da ab Delphio cantharum circum, id Most. 1, 4, 33: ab eo nobis causa ordienda est potissimum,

    Cic. Leg. 1, 7, 21:

    coepere a fame mala,

    Liv. 4, 12, 7:

    cornicem a cauda de ovo exire,

    tail-foremost, Plin. 10, 16, 18:

    a capite repetis, quod quaerimus,

    Cic. Leg. 1, 6, 18 al.
    e.
    With verbs of freeing from, defending, or protecting against any thing:

    a foliis et stercore purgato,

    Cato, R. R. 65 (66), 1:

    tantumne ab re tuast oti tibi?

    Ter. Heaut. 1, [p. 4] 1, 23; cf.:

    Saguntini ut a proeliis quietem habuerant,

    Liv. 21, 11, 5:

    expiandum forum ab illis nefarii sceleris vestigiis,

    Cic. Rab. Perd. 4, 11:

    haec provincia non modo a calamitate, sed etiam a metu calamitatis est defendenda,

    id. Imp. Pomp. 6, 14 (v. defendo):

    ab incendio urbem vigiliis munitam intellegebat,

    Sall. C. 32:

    ut neque sustinere se a lapsu possent,

    Liv. 21, 35, 12:

    ut meam domum metueret atque a me ipso caveret,

    Cic. Sest. 64, 133.
    f.
    With verbs of expecting, fearing, hoping, and the like, ab =a parte, as, Cic. Att. 9, 7, 4: cum eadem metuam ab hac parte, since I fear the same from this side; hence, timere, metuere ab aliquo, not, to be afraid of any one, but, to fear something (proceeding from) from him:

    el metul a Chryside,

    Ter. And. 1, 1, 79; cf.:

    ab Hannibale metuens,

    Liv. 23, 36; and:

    metus a praetore,

    id. 23, 15, 7;

    v. Weissenb. ad h. l.: a quo quidem genere, judices, ego numquam timui,

    Cic. Sull. 20, 59:

    postquam nec ab Romanis robis ulla est spes,

    you can expect nothing from the Romans, Liv. 21, 13, 4.
    g.
    With verbs of fastening and holding:

    funiculus a puppi religatus,

    Cic. Inv. 2, 51, 154:

    cum sinistra capillum ejus a vertice teneret,

    Q. Cic. Pet. Cons. 3.
    h.
    Ulcisci se ab aliquo, to take vengeance on one:

    a ferro sanguis humanus se ulciscitur,

    Plin. 34, 14, 41 fin.
    i.
    Cognoscere ab aliqua re to knoio or learn by means of something (different from ab aliquo, to learn from some one):

    id se a Gallicis armis atque insignibus cognovisse,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 22.
    j.
    Dolere, laborare, valere ab, instead of the simple abl.:

    doleo ab animo, doleo ab oculis, doleo ab aegritudine,

    Plaut. Cist. 1, 1, 62:

    a morbo valui, ab animo aeger fui,

    id. Ep. 1, 2, 26; cf. id. Aul. 2, 2, 9:

    a frigore et aestu ne quid laborent,

    Varr. R. R. 2, 2, 17; so,

    a frigore laborantibus,

    Plin. 32, 10, 46, § 133; cf.:

    laborare ab re frumentaria,

    Caes. B. G. 7, 10, 1; id. B. C. 3, 9; v. laboro.
    k.
    Where verbs and adjectives are joined with ab, instead of the simple abl., ab defines more exactly the respect in which that which is expressed by the verb or adj. is to be understood, in relation to, with regard to, in respect to, on the part of:

    ab ingenio improbus,

    Plaut. Truc. 4, 3, 59:

    a me pudica'st,

    id. Curc. 1, 1, 51:

    orba ab optimatibus contio,

    Cic. Fl. 23, 54; ro Ov. H. 6,156: securos vos ab hac parte reddemus, Planc. ap. Cic. Fam. 10, 24 fin. (v. securus):

    locus copiosus a frumento,

    Cic. Att. 5, 18, 2; cf.:

    sumus imparati cum a militibas tum a pecunia,

    id. ib. 7, 15 fin.:

    ille Graecus ab omni laude felicior,

    id. Brut. 16, 63:

    ab una parte haud satis prosperuin,

    Liv. 1, 32, 2 al.;

    so often in poets ab arte=arte,

    artfully, Tib. 1, 5, 4; 1, 9, 66; Ov. Am. 2, 4, 30.
    l.
    In the statement of the motive instead of ex, propter, or the simple abl. causae, from, out of, on account of, in consequence of: ab singulari amore scribo, Balb. ap. Cic. Att. 9, 7, B fin.:

    linguam ab irrisu exserentem,

    thrusting out the tongue in derision, Liv. 7, 10, 5:

    ab honore,

    id. 1, 8; so, ab ira, a spe, ab odio, v. Drak. ad Liv. 24, 30, 1: 26, 1, 3; cf. also Kritz and Fabri ad Sall. J. 31, 3, and Fabri ad Liv. 21, 36, 7.
    m.
    Especially in the poets instead of the gen.:

    ab illo injuria,

    Ter. And. 1, 1, 129:

    fulgor ab auro,

    Lucr. 2, 5:

    dulces a fontibus undae,

    Verg. G. 2, 243.
    n.
    In indicating a part of the whole, for the more usual ex, of, out of:

    scuto ab novissimis uni militi detracto,

    Caes. B. G. 2, 25, 1:

    nonnuill ab novissimis,

    id. ib.; Cic. Sest. 65, 137; cf. id. ib. 59 fin.: a quibus (captivis) ad Senatum missus (Regulus).
    o.
    In marking that from which any thing proceeds, and to which it belongs:

    qui sunt ab ea disciplina,

    Cic. Tusc. 2, 3, 7:

    ab eo qui sunt,

    id. Fin. 4, 3, 7:

    nostri illi a Platone et Aristotele aiunt,

    id. Mur. 30, 63 (in imitation of oi upo tinos).
    p.
    To designate an office or dignity (with or without servus; so not freq. till after the Aug. period;

    in Cic. only once): Pollex, servus a pedibus meus,

    one of my couriers, Cic. Att. 8, 5, 1; so,

    a manu servus,

    a secretary, Suet. Caes. 74: Narcissum ab eplstulis ( secretary) et Pallantem a rationibus ( accountant), id. Claud. 28; and so, ab actis, ab admissione, ab aegris, ab apotheca, ab argento, a balneis, a bibliotheca, a codicillis, a jumentis, a potione, etc. (v. these words and Inscr. Orell. vol. 3, Ind. xi. p. 181 sq.).
    q.
    The use of ab before adverbs is for the most part peculiar to later Latinity:

    a peregre,

    Vitr. 5, 7 (6), 8:

    a foris,

    Plin. 17, 24, 37; Vulg. Gen, 7, 16; ib. Matt. 23, 27:

    ab intus,

    ib. ib. 7, 15:

    ab invicem,

    App. Herb. 112; Vulg. Matt. 25, 32; Cypr. Ep. 63, 9: Hier. Ep. 18:

    a longe,

    Hyg. Fab. 257; Vulg. Gen. 22, 4; ib. Matt. 26, 58:

    a modo,

    ib. ib. 23, 39;

    Hier. Vit. Hilar.: a nune,

    Vulg. Luc. 1, 48:

    a sursum,

    ib. Marc. 15, 38.
    a.
    Ab is not repeated like most other prepositions (v. ad, ex, in, etc.) with pron. interrog. or relat. after subst. and pron. demonstr. with ab:

    Arsinoen, Stratum, Naupactum...fateris ab hostibus esse captas. Quibus autem hostibus? Nempe iis, quos, etc.,

    Cic. Pis. 37, 91:

    a rebus gerendis senectus abstrahit. Quibus? An iis, quae in juventute geruntur et viribus?

    id. Sen. 6:

    a Jove incipiendum putat. Quo Jove?

    id. Rep. 1, 36, 56:

    res publica, quascumque vires habebit, ab iis ipsis, quibus tenetur, de te propediem impetrabit,

    id. Fam. 4, 13, 5.—
    b.
    Ab in Plantus is once put after the word which it governs: quo ab, As. 1, 1, 106.—
    c.
    It is in various ways separated from the word which it governs:

    a vitae periculo,

    Cic. Brut. 91, 313:

    a nullius umquam me tempore aut commodo,

    id. Arch. 6, 12:

    a minus bono,

    Sall. C. 2, 6:

    a satis miti principio,

    Liv. 1, 6, 4:

    damnis dives ab ipsa suis,

    Ov. H. 9, 96; so id. ib. 12, 18; 13, 116.—
    d.
    The poets join a and que, making aque; but in good prose que is annexed to the following abl. (a meque, abs teque, etc.):

    aque Chao,

    Verg. G. 4, 347:

    aque mero,

    Ov. M. 3, 631:

    aque viro,

    id. H. 6, 156:

    aque suis,

    id. Tr. 5, 2, 74 al. But:

    a meque,

    Cic. Fam. 2, 16, 1:

    abs teque,

    id. Att. 3, 15, 4:

    a teque,

    id. ib. 8, 11, §

    7: a primaque adulescentia,

    id. Brut. 91, 315 al. —
    e.
    A Greek noun joined with ab stands in the dat.: a parte negotiati, hoc est pragmatikê, removisse, Quint. 3, 7, 1.
    III.
    In composition ab,
    1.
    Retains its original signif.: abducere, to take or carry away from some place: abstrahere, to draw auay; also, downward: abicere, to throw down; and denoting a departure from the idea of the simple word, it has an effect apparently privative: absimilis, departing from the similar, unlike: abnormis, departing from the rule, unusual (different from dissimilis, enormis); and so also in amens=a mente remotus, alienus ( out of one's senses, without self-control, insane): absurdus, missounding, then incongruous, irrational: abutor (in one of its senses), to misuse: aborior, abortus, to miscarry: abludo; for the privative force the Latin regularly employs in-, v. 2. in.—
    2.
    It more rarely designates completeness, as in absorbere, abutor ( to use up). (The designation of the fourth generation in the ascending or descending line by ab belongs here only in appearance; as abavus for quartus pater, great-great-grandfather, although the Greeks introduced upopappos; for the immutability of the syllable ab in abpatrnus and abmatertera, as well as the signif. Of the word abavus, grandfather's grandfather, imitated in abnepos, grandchild's grandchild, seems to point to a derivation from avi avus, as Festus, p. 13 Mull., explains atavus, by atta avi, or, rather, attae avus.)

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > ab

  • 9 C

    C, c, n. indecl., or f., the third letter of the Latin alphabet; corresponded originally in sound to the Greek G (which in inscrr., esp. in the Doric, was frequently written like the Latin C; v. O. Müll. Etrusk. 2, p. 295); hence the old orthography: LECIONES, MACISTRATOS, EXFOCIONT, [pu]CNANDOD, PVC[nad], CARTACINIENSI, upon the Columna rostrata, for legiones, magistratos, effugiunt, pugnando, pugnā, Carthaginiensi; and the prænomina Gaius and Gnaeus, even to the latest times, were designated by C. and Cn., while Caeso or Kaeso was written with K; cf. the letter G. Still, even as early as the time of the kings, whether through the influence of the Tuscans, among whom G sounded like K, or of the. Sabines, whose language was kindred with that of the Tuscans, the C seems to have been substituted for K; hence even Consul was designated by Cos., and K remained in use only before a, as in Kalendae; k. k. for calumniae causā, INTERKAL for intercalaris, MERK for mercatus, and in a few other republican inscrr., because by this vowel K was distinguished from Q, as in Gr. Kappa from Koppa, and in Phœnician Caph from Cuph, while C was employed like other consonants with e. Q was used at the beginning of words only when u, pronounced like v, followed, as Quirites from Cures, Tanaquil from Thanchufil, Thanchfil, ThankWil; accordingly, C everywhere took the place of Q, when that accompanying labial sound was lost, or u was used as a vowel; so in the gentile name of Maecenas Cilnius, from the Etrusk. Cvelne or Cfelne (O. Müll. Etrusk. 1, p. 414 sq.); so in coctus, cocus, alicubi, sicubi; in relicŭŭs (four syl.) for reliquus (trisyl.): AECETIA = AEQITIA, i. q. aequitas (V. AECETIA), etc., and as in the Golden Age cujus was written for quojus, and cui for quoi (corresponding to cum for quom); thus, even in the most ancient period, quor or cur was used together with [p. 257] quare, cura with quaero, curia with Quiris, as inversely inquilinus with incola, and in S. C. Bacch. OQVOLTOD = occulto. Hence, at the end of words que, as well as ce in hic, sic, istic, illic, was changed to c, as in ac for atque, nec for neque, nunc, tunc, donec for numque, tumque, dumque; and in the middle of words it might also pass into g. as in negotium and neglego, cf. necopinus. Since C thus gradually took the place of K and Q, with the single exception that our kw was throughout designated by qu, it was strange that under the emperors grammarians began again to write k instead of c before a, though even Quint. 1, 7, 10, expressed his displeasure at this; and they afterwards wrote q before u, even when no labial sound followed, as in pequnia, or merely peqnia, for pecunia; cf. the letters Q and U. About the beginning of the sixth century of the city the modified form G was introduced for the flat guttural sound, and C thenceforth regularly represented the hard sound = our K. The use of aspirates was unknown to the Romans during the first six centuries, hence the letter C also represents the Gr. X, as BACA and BACANALIBVS, for Baccha and Bacchanalibus (the single C instead of the double, as regularly in the most ancient times); cf. also schizô with scindo, and poluchroos with pulcer. But even in the time of Cicero scheda came into use for scida, and pulcher for pulcer; so also the name of the Gracchi was aspirated, as were the name Cethegus and the word triumphus, which, however, in the song of the Arval brothers, is TRIVMPVS; cf. Cic. Or. 48, 160, and the letter P. About this time the use of aspirates became so common, in imitation of Greek, that Catullus wrote upon it an epigram (84), which begins with the words: Cho mmoda dicebat, si quando commoda vellet; and in Monum. Ancyr. inchoo is used for the orig. incoho, acc. to which the ancient Romans also employed cohors for chors (v. cohors).On account of the near relationship of c and g, as given above, they are very often interchanged, esp. when connected with liquids: Cygnus, Progne, Gnidus, Gnossus, from kuknos, Proknê, Knidos, Knôssos (even when n was separated from c by a vowel, as in Saguntum for Zakunthos, or absorbed by an s, as in vigesimus and trigesimus for vicensimus and tricensimus); mulgeo for mulceo, segmen from seco, gummi for commi (kommi); gurgulio for curculio, grabatus for krabatos, so that amurca was also written for amurga, from amorgê, as inversely conger for gonger, from gongros; but also with other letters; cf. mastruca and mastruga, misceo and misgô, mugio and mukaomai, gobius and kôbios, gubernator and kubernêtês. Not less freq. is the interchange of c and t, which is noticed by Quint. Inst. 1, 11, 5, and in accordance with which, in composition, d or t before qu, except with que, became c, as acquiro, nequicquam, iccirco for idcirco, ecquis for etquis, etc. Hence is explained the rejection of c before t, as in Lutatius for Luctatius, and the arbitrariness with which many names were written with cc or tt for ct, as Vettones for Vectones; Nacca or Natta for Nacta (from the Gr. gnaptô). It would be erroneouś to infer, from the varied orthography of the names' Accius, Attius, and Actius, or Peccius, Pettius, and Pectius, a hissing pronunciation of them; for as the Romans interchange the terminations icius and itius, and the orthography fetialis and fecialis, indutiae and induciae, with one another, they also wrote Basculi or Bastuli, anclare or antlare, etc. Ci for ti does not appear till an African inscr. of the third century after Christ, and not often before Gallic inscrr. and documents of the seventh century; ti for ci is not certainly found before the end of the fourth century; and ci before a vowel does not appear to have been pronounced as sh, except provincially, before the sixth or seventh century; cf. Roby, Gr. bk. 1, ch. 7; and so in gen., Corss. Ausspr. I. p. 33 sqq. C is sometimes interchanged with p: columba, palumbes; coquus, popa, popina (cf. in Gr. koteros; Sanscr. katara; poteros; Lat. uter). C is sometimes dropped in the middle of a word: luna for luc-na, lumen for luc-men; so also at the beginning of a word: uter for cuter; Sanscr. katara, v. supra.As an abbreviation, C designates Gaius, and reversed, O, Gaia; cf. Quint. 1, 7, 28. As a numeral, C = centum, and upon voting tablets = condemno, Ascon. Cic. Div. in Caecil. 7, 24; cf. the letter A fin.;

    hence it is called littera tristis (opp. A = absolvo, which is called littera salutaris),

    Cic. Mil. 6, 15 Moeb.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > C

  • 10 G

    G, g, indecl. n. or (on account of littera) f., had originally no place in the Latin alphabet: both the sharp and the flat guttural mutes, our k and g sounds, being represented by C; hence on the Columna Rostrata LECIONES, MACISTRATOS, EXFOCIONT, (pu)CNANDOD, PVCN(ad), CARTACINIENSIS, for legiones, etc.; hence, too, the archaic form ACETARE for agitare (v. Paul. ex Fest. p. 23 Müll. N. cr.), and the still common abbreviation of the names Gaius and Gneus in C and Cn.—At a later period (acc. to Plut. Qu. Rom. p. 277 D and 278 E, by means of a freedman of Spurius Carvilius Ruga, about the beginning of the second Punic war) a slight graphic alteration was made in the C, which introduced into the Roman orthography the letter G (on the old monuments C); thus we have in the S. C. de Bacchanal.: MAGISTER, MAGISTRATVM, FIGIER, GNOSCIER, AGRO; on the other hand, the orthography GNAIVOD PATRE PROGNATVS on the first Epitaph of the Scipios, which dates before that time, indicates either incorrectness in the copying or a later erection of the monument. When Greek words are written in Latin letters and vice versa, G always corresponds to G. Its sound was always hard, like Engl. g in gate, at least until the sixth century A. D.As an initial, g, in pure Latin words, enters into consonantal combination only with l and r; and therefore in words which, from their etymology, had the combination gn, the g was rejected in the classical period, and thus arose the class. forms nascor, natus, nosco, novi, notus, narus, navus, from the original gnascor, gnatus, gnosco, etc. (cf. the English gnaw, gnat, gnarr, etc., where the g has become silent); whereas in compounds the g again is often retained: cognatus, cognosco, ignarus, ignavus.—An initial g is dropped in lac (kindred to GALACT, gala), likewise in anser (kindred to Germ. Gans; Sanscr. hansa; Greek chên).As a medial, g combines with l, m, n, r, although it is sometimes elided before m in the course of formation; so in examen for exagmen from agmen; in contamino for contagmino (from con-TAG, tango). Before s the soft sound of g passes into the hard sound of c, and becomes blended with the s into x (v. the letter X); though sometimes the g (or c) is elided altogether, as in mulsi from mulgeo, indulsi from indulgeo; cf.: sparsus, mersus, tersus, etc. So too before t, as indultum from indulgeo. The medial g is often dropped between two vowels, and compensated for by lengthening the preced. vowel: māior from măgior, pulēium from pulēgium, āio from ăgio (root AG, Sanscr. ah, to say; cf. nego). Likewise the medial g is dropped in lēvis for legvis, Sanscr. laghn, fava for fagva, fruor for frugvor, flamma for flagma, stimulus for stigmulus, examen for exagmen; jumentum, from root jug-: sumen from sug-; cf.: umor, flamen, etc.As a final, g was only paragogic, acc. to Quint. 1, 7, 13, in the obsolete VESPERVG (for vesperu, analogous with noctu; v. Spald. ad loc.). Etymologically, g corresponds to an original Indo - European g or gh, or is weakened from c, k. Thus it stands where in Greek we have:
    (α).
    g, as ago, agô; ager, agros; argentum, arguros; genus, genos; fulgeo, phlegô, and so very commonly;
    (β).
    ch (usually before r, or in the middle of a word): ango, anchô; rigo, brechô; gratus, chairô, etc.;
    (γ).
    k: viginti, eikosi; gubernator, kubernêtês; gummi, kommi, etc.—By assimilation, g was produced from b and d in oggero, suggero, aggero, etc., from obgero, sub-gero, ad-gero, etc.As an abbreviation, G denotes Galliarum, Gallica, gemina, Germania, genius, etc.; and sometimes Gaius (instead of the usual C); v. Inscr. Orell. 467; 1660; 4680:

    G.P.R.F. genio populi Romani feliciter,

    Inscr. Orell. 4957; v. Corss. Ausspr. 1, 76 sqq.; Roby, Lat. Gr. 1, 38 sqq.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > G

  • 11 Magnus

    1.
    magnus, a, um (archaic gen. magnai for magnae:

    magnai reipublicai gratia,

    Plaut. Mil. 2, 1, 23), adj.; comp. mājor, us; sup. maxĭmus ( maxŭm-), a, um [root magh-; Sanscr. mahat, maba, great; Gr. megas; cf. meizôn for megiôn; cf. mêchos, majestas; also cf. root mak-; Gr. makros, and perh. makar], great, large.
    I.
    Lit., of physical size or quantity, great, large; of things, vast, extensive, spacious, etc.: nequam et magnus homo, a great, tall fellow, Lucil. ap. Varr. L. L. 7, § 32 Mull.; cf.

    the double meaning: tu, bis denis grandia libris Qui scribis Priami proelia, magnus homo es,

    a great man, Mart. 9, 51, 4: magna ossa lacertique Apparent homini, Lucil. ap. Macr. S. 6, 1:

    magna ossa lacertosque Exuit,

    Verg. A. 5, 422: (scarus) magnusque bonusque, Enn. ap. App. Mag. p. 299 (Heduph. v. 9 Vahl.): indu mari magno, id. ap. Macr. 6, 2 (Ann. v. 425 Vahl.); so, in mari magno, id. ap. Fest. p. 356 Mull.; cf. Lucr. 2, 554:

    magnus fluens Nilus,

    Verg. G. 3, 28; Sen. Q. N. 4, 2, 2:

    magna et pulcra domus,

    spacious, Cic. N. D. 2, 6, 17:

    montes,

    Cat. 64. 280; cf. Olympum, Enn. ap. Varr. L. L. 7, § 20 Mull. (Ann. v. 1 Vahl.):

    templa caelitum,

    vast, id. ib. 7, § 6 (Trag. v. 227 Vahl.): magnae quercus, great oaks, lofty oaks, id. ap. Macr. S. 6, 2 (Ann. v. 194 Vahl.):

    aquae,

    great floods, inundations, Liv. 24, 9: saxa maxima, Enn. ap. Cic. Tusc. 1, 16, 37:

    oppidum maximum,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 23.—
    B.
    Esp.
    1.
    Of measure, weight, quantity, great, much, abundant, considerable, etc.:

    maximum pondus auri, magnum numerum frumenti, vim mellis maximam exportasse,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 2, 72, § 176:

    magna pecunia mutua,

    id. Att. 11, 3, 3:

    copia pabuli,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 16:

    multitudo peditatus,

    id. ib. 4, 34:

    divitiae,

    Nep. Dion. 1, 2:

    populus,

    Verg. A. 1, 148.—
    2.
    Rarely of time, for longus, multus:

    interea magnum sol circumvolvitur annum,

    Verg. A. 3, 284:

    magnum vocans solis (annum) comparatione lunaris,

    Macr. S. 2, 11:

    magno post tempore,

    Just. 11, 10, 14; 32, 3, 10.—
    3.
    Of the voice, loud, powerful, strong, mighty:

    magna voce confiteri,

    Cic. Caecin. 32, 92: major pars, the majority:

    tribunorum,

    Liv. 9, 46, 7.
    II.
    Trop.
    A.
    In gen., great, grand, mighty, noble, lofty, important, of great weight or importance, momentous: cum magnis dis, Enn. ap. Cic. Off. 1, 12, 38 (Ann. v. 207 Vahl.); cf.: Saturnia magna dearum, id. ap. Prisc. p. 1103 P. (Ann. v. 482 Vahl.):

    vir magnus in primis,

    Cic. N. D. 1, 43, 120:

    nemo igitur vir magnus sine aliquo adflatu divino umquam fuit,

    id. ib. 2, 66, 167:

    magnus hoc bello Themistocles fuit, nec minor in pace,

    Nep. Them. 6, 1:

    Cato clarus atque magnus habetur,

    Sall. C. 53, 1:

    amicus,

    great, wealthy, Juv. 6, 312: res magnas parvasque Eloqui, Enn. ap. Gell. 12, 4 (Ann. v. 244 Vahl.):

    virtus,

    Caes. B. G. 2, 15:

    infamia,

    Cic. Fam. 1, 1:

    eloquentia, gravitas, studium, contentio,

    id. ib.:

    multo major alacritas, studiumque pugnandi majus,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 46:

    causa,

    great, important, weighty, Cic. Dom. 1, 1:

    opus et arduum,

    id. Or. 10, 33.— Absol. in neutr, sing. and plur.:

    quamquam id magnum, et arduum est,

    something great, Cic. Fam. 6, 7, 6: magna Di curant ( great things, important matters), parva neglegunt, id. N. D. 2, 66, 167:

    magna loqui,

    to say great things, speak boastfully, Tib. 2, 6, 11:

    magnum est efficere, ut quis intellegat, quid sit illud, etc.,

    it is a great, difficult, important thing, Cic. Ac. 1, 2, 7:

    probitatem vel in eis, quos numquam vidimus, vel, quod majus est, in hoste etiam diligimus,

    what is far greater, id. Lael. 9, 29: annus magnus, the great year, at the end of which the sun, moon, and planets were supposed to return to the same relative positions, the Piatonic year or cycle, consisting of 15000 years:

    quarum (stellarum) ex disparibus motionibus, magnum annum mathematici nominaverunt, etc.,

    Cic. N. D. 2, 20, 52; id. Fragm. ap. Tac. Or. 16.— Posit. in comparison: Alexander orbi magnus est, Alex. andro orbis angustus, great in comparison with, i. e. too great for, Sen. Suas. 1, 3.—
    B.
    In partic.
    1.
    Of age, with natu, advanced in years, of great age, aged:

    jam magno natu,

    Nep. Paus. 5; Liv. 3, 71, 3:

    homo magnus natu,

    id. 10, 38, 6.—Usually in the comp. and sup., with or without natu or annis, older, the elder, the oldest or eldest:

    qui (Livius) fuit major natu quam Plautus et Naevius,

    older than, earlier, Cic. Tusc. 1, 1, 3:

    audivi ex majoribus natu,

    id. Off. 1, 30, 109:

    hic una e multis, quae maxima natu, Pyrgo,

    Verg. A. 5, 644:

    annos natus major quadraginta,

    more than, Cic. Rosc. Am. 14, 39:

    civis major annis viginti,

    Suet. Caes. 42:

    cum liberis, majoribus quam quindecim annos natis,

    Liv. 45, 32.— Absol.: senis nostri frater major, the elder of two, Ter. Phorm. 1, 2, 13:

    ex duobus filiis major, Caes B. C. 3, 108, 3: Fabii Ambusti filiae duae nuptae, Ser. Sulpicio major minor Licinio Stoloni erat,

    Liv. 6, 34:

    Gelo maximus stirpis,

    id. 23, 30:

    ut nubere vellet mulier viro, major juniori,

    App. Mag. 27, p. 291, 28; cf.

    in gen.: Cyrus major,

    Lact. 4, 5, 7:

    quaerere uter major aetate fuerit, Homerus an Hesiodus, cum minor Hecuba fuerit quam Helena,

    Sen. Ep. 88, 5.—In legal lang., major (opp. minor), one who has attained his twenty-fifth year, who is of age:

    si minor negotiis majoris intervenerit,

    Dig. 4, 4, 24.—In plur. subst.: mājō-res, um, m., adults (opp. pueri), Varr. L. L. 9, 10, § 16 Mull.—But usually majores, ancestors, forefathers:

    Itan tandem hanc majores famam tradiderunt tibi tui, Ut, etc.,

    Plaut. Trin. 3, 2, 16:

    ibi mei sunt majores siti, pater, avos, proavos, abavos,

    id. Mil. 2, 4, 20:

    L. Philippus, vir patre, avo, majoribus suis dignissimus,

    Cic. Phil. 3, 10, 25:

    patres majoresque nostri,

    id. Div. in Caecil. 21, 69:

    more majorum,

    id. Att. 1, 1, 1:

    spes tamen una est, aliquando populum Romanum majorum similem fore,

    id. Fam. 12, 22, 2:

    majores natu,

    Nep. Iphicr. 1, 1:

    maxima virgo,

    the eldest of the Vestal virgins, Ov. F. 4, 639: major erus, the old master, the master of the house, the old man (opp.: minor erus, the young master): Le. Ubinam est erus? Li. Major apud forum'st, minor hic est intus, Plaut. As. 2, 2, 63: majores natu, of the Senate:

    de istis rebus in patria majores natu consulemus,

    Liv. 1, 32, 10.—In designating relationship, magnus denotes kindred of the fourth, major of the fifth, and maximus of the sixth degree; so, avunculus magnus, a great-uncle; amita magna, a greataunt; avunculus or amita major; avunculus maximus, amita maxima, etc.; v. h. vv., and cf. Dig. 38, 10, 10.—
    2.
    In specifications of value, in the neutr. absol., magni or magno, high, dear, of great value, at a high price, etc.; cf.: pretii majoris or maximi, higher, highest, very high:

    magni esse,

    to be highly esteemed, Cic. Fam. 13, 72, 2:

    magni aestimare,

    id. Tusc. 5, 7, 20:

    magni existimans interesse ad decus,

    to be of great consequence, id. N. D. 1, 4, 7:

    emere agros poterunt quam volent magno,

    id. Agr. 2, 13, 34:

    magno vendere,

    id. Verr. 2, 3, 30, § 71:

    conducere aliquid nimium magno,

    too high, too dear, id. Att. 1, 17, 9:

    magno illi ea cunctatio stetit,

    cost him dear, Liv. 2, 36.— Comp.:

    ornatus muliebris majoris pretii,

    Cic. Inv 1, 31, 51, rarely without pretii:

    multo majoris alapae mecum veneunt,

    dearer, higher, Phaedr. 2, 5, 25.— Sup.: te haec solum semper fecit maxumi, most highly prized, Ter And. 1, 5, 58:

    senatus auctoritatem sibi maximi videri,

    Cic. Att. 1, 14, 2: in majus, too greatly, too highly, greater than it is:

    extollere aliquid in majus,

    more highly than it deserves, Tac. A. 15, 30:

    celebrare,

    id. ib. 13, 8:

    nuntiare,

    id. H. 3, 38:

    credere,

    to believe a thing to be worse than it is, id. ib. 1, 18:

    accipere,

    to take a thing to be greater than it is, id. ib. 3, 8 init.: innotescere, in an exaggerated manner, id. ib 4, 50.—Also with abl., in majus vero ferri, Liv. 21, 32, 7.—
    3.
    Magnum and maximum, adverbially, greatly, loudly (ante- and post-class.):

    magnum clamat,

    greatly, with a loud voice, aloud, Plaut. Mil. 3, 2, 10:

    inclamare,

    Gell. 5, 9 fin.:

    exclamat derepente maximum,

    Plaut. Most. 2, 2, 57.—Hence, măgis, adv., only in comp. in this anomalous form (i. e. mag-ius, like pris-cus for [p. 1100] prius-cus, and pris-tinus for prius-tinus); and in sup.: maxĭmē ( maxŭmē).
    A.
    Comp.: magĭs (apocop. form, măgĕ, Plaut. As. 1, 1, 51; 2, 3, 14; id. Mon. 2, 3, 35; id. Poen. 1, 2, 64; 1, 2, 14; id. Trin. 4, 3, 46; id. Truc. 1, 2, 75; 3, 1, 17; 4, 4, 34; Lucr. 4, 81; 756; 5, 1203; Prop. 1, 11, 9; 3 (4), 14, 2; 4 (5), 8, 16; Verg. A. 10, 481; Sol. 22 fin.; but in Enn. ap. Cic. Fam. 7, 13, 2, magis or magi'. Acc. to Serv. Verg. A. 10, 481, Cicero in the Frumentaria wrote: mage condemnatum hominum in judicium adducere non posse), in a higher degree, more completely, more (for the difference between magis, plus, potius, and amplius, v. amplius).—
    B.
    In gen.
    1.
    With no qualifying words.
    a.
    With the addition of the second term of the comparison.
    (α).
    With verbs:

    quae (facinora) istaec aetas fugere magis quam sectari solet,

    Plaut. Mil. 3, 1, 28:

    saliendo sese exercebant magis, quam scorto aut saviis,

    id. Bacch. 3, 3, 25; id. Pers. 4, 4, 108; 86:

    magis honorem tribuere quam salutem accipere,

    Caes. B. G. 7, 20, 7:

    nisi forte magis erit parricida, si qui consularem patrem, quam si quis humilem necarit,

    Cic. Mil. 7, 17:

    magis ut consuetudinem servem, quam quod, etc.,

    id. Clu. 32, 89.—Repeated:

    quam magis exhausto spumaverit ubere mulctra, Laeta magis pressis manabunt flumina mammis, i. e. quo magis,... eo magis,

    Verg. G. 3, 309 sq.; cf.:

    tam magis illa fremens... quam magis effuso crudescunt sanguine pugnae,

    id. ib. 7, 787 sq.; v. Hand, Turs. III. p. 566.—Magis est, quod or ut, there is greater reason, there is more cause that, etc.:

    quamobrem etsi magis est, quod gratuler tibi, quam quod te rogem: tamen etiam rogo, etc.,

    Cic. Att. 16, 5, 2:

    magis est, ut ipse moleste ferat, errasse se, quam ut, etc.,

    id. Cael. 6, 14.—
    (β).
    With substt., usu. with quam: tu me amoris magis quam honoris servavisti gratia, Poet. ap. Cic. Tusc. 4, 32, 69: bellipotentes sunt magi' quam sapientipotentes, Enn. ap. Cic. Div. 2, 56, 116 (Ann. v. 188 Vahl.):

    umbra es amantum magis quam amator,

    Plaut. Mil. 3, 1, 31:

    magis adeo id facilitate quam alia ulla culpa mea contigit,

    Cic. de Or. 2, 4, 15:

    aditus ad consulatum non magis nobilitati quam virtuti pateret,

    id. Mur. 8, 17:

    magis ratione et consilio quam virtute vicisse,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 40, 8; cf.:

    ut magis virtute quam dolo contenderent,

    id. ib. 1, 13, 6:

    se magis consuetudine sua quam merito eorum civitatem conservaturum,

    id. ib. 2, 32, 1:

    timori magis quam religioni consulere,

    id. B. C. 1, 67, 3:

    jus bonumque apud eos non legibus magis quam natura valebat,

    Sall. C. 9, 1:

    non duces magis quam milites callent (obsistere, etc.),

    Curt. 3, 2, 14.—And after negatives: non magis quam, as little as:

    in dicendo irasci, dolere... non sunt figurae, non magis quam suadere,

    Quint. 9, 1, 23:

    Romanos nec magis jam dolo capi quam armis vinci posse,

    Liv. 10, 4, 10:

    pro certo habens non magis Antonio eripi se quam Caesari Brutum posse,

    Sen. Suas. 6, 17:

    non magis Alexandri saevitiam quam Bessi parricidium ferre potuisse,

    Curt. 7, 6, 15; cf.:

    nec magis post proelium quam in proelio caedibus temperatum est,

    Liv. 2, 16, 9. —Followed by atque instead of quam (rare):

    non Apollinis magis verum atque hoc responsum est,

    Ter. And. 4, 2, 15.— With the comp. abl. (rare):

    quid philosophia magis colendum?

    Cic. Fin. 3, 22, 76:

    quanto magis Aliensi die Aliam ipsam reformidaturos?

    Liv. 6, 28, 6 Weissenb. ad loc.:

    quam Juno fertur terris magis omnibus unam... coluisse,

    Verg. A. 1, 15 (cf. B. 3. infra):

    Albanum sive Falernum Te magis appositis delectat,

    Hor. S. 2, 8, 17.—
    (γ).
    With pronn.:

    quid habetis, qui mage immortales vos credam esse quam ego siem?

    Plaut. Poen. 1, 2, 64:

    quis homo sit magis meus quam tu es?

    id. Mil. 3, 1, 20:

    quam mage amo quam matrem meam,

    id. Truc. 3, 1, 17; cf.:

    quem ego ecastor mage amo quam me,

    id. ib. 4, 4, 34.—With utrum, followed by an:

    jam scibo, utrum haec me mage amet, an marsupium,

    Plaut. Men. 2, 3, 35.—With the abl. instead of quam:

    nec magis hac infra quicquam est in corpore nostro,

    Lucr. 3, 274; Verg. A. 1, 15.—
    (δ).
    With adjj. and advv., and esp. with those which do not admit the comparative termination (most freq. without adding the second term of the comparison; v. under b. d): numquam potuisti mihi Magis opportunus advenire quam advenis, Plaut. Most. 3, 1, 47:

    neque lac lacti magis est simile, quam ille ego similis est mei,

    id. Am. 2, 1, 54:

    ars magis magna atque uber, quam difficilis et obscura,

    Cic. de Or. 1, 42, 190:

    corpora magna magis quam firma,

    Liv. 5, 44, 4:

    vultu pulchro magis quam venusto,

    Suet. Ner. 51.—With the abl., Plaut. As. 3, 3, 114:

    neque ego hoc homine quemquam vidi magis malum,

    id. Ps. 4, 1, 27:

    ab secundis rebus magis etiam solito incauti,

    Liv. 5, 44, 6.—With compp. (adding to their force):

    ita fustibus sum mollior miser magis quam ullus cinaedus,

    Plaut. Aul. 3, 2, 8. —
    b.
    Without the addition of the second term.
    (α).
    With verbs: ergo plusque magisque viri nunc gloria claret, Enn. ap. Macr. S. 6, 1 (Ann. v. 315 Vahl.):

    sapiunt magis,

    Plaut. Bacch. 3, 3, 4:

    magis curae est, magisque afformido, ne, etc.,

    id. ib. 4, 10, 3:

    magis metuant,

    id. Mil. 5, 44:

    tum magis id diceres, Fanni, si, etc.,

    Cic. Lael. 7 fin.; cf. id. Rep. 1, 40, 62:

    cum Pompeius ita contendisset, ut nihil umquam magis,

    id. Fam. 1, 9, 20:

    magis velle, for malle: quod magis vellem evenire,

    Ter. Eun. 5, 7, 1; Val. Fl. 3, 270.—
    (β).
    With substt.: non ex jure manum consertum sed magi' ferro, Enn. ap. Gell. 20, 10 (Ann. v. 276 Vahl.):

    magis aedilis fieri non potuisset,

    better, finer, Cic. Planc. 24, 60.—
    (γ).
    With pronn.:

    ecastor neminem hodie mage Amat corde atque animo suo,

    Plaut. Truc. 1, 2, 75.—
    (δ).
    With adjj. and advv. (so most freq.).—With adjj.:

    ut quadam magis necessaria ratione recte sit vivendum,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 3, 1, § 2:

    magis anxius,

    Ov. M. 1, 182:

    hic magis tranquillu'st,

    Plaut. Bacch. 5, 2, 55:

    nihil videtur mundius, nec magis compositum quicquam, nec magis elegans,

    Ter. Eun. 5, 4, 12:

    nemo fuit magis severus nec magis continens,

    id. ib. 2, 1, 21:

    quod est magis verisimile,

    Caes. B. G. 3, 13, 6:

    magis admirabilis oratio,

    Quint. 8, 3, 24:

    magis communia verba,

    id. 8, 2, 24 et saep.; rare: magis quam in aliis = praeter ceteros;

    nescio quo pacto magis quam in aliis suum cuique pulchrum est,

    Cic. Tusc. 5, 22, 63.— With advv.:

    magis aperte,

    Ter. Ad. 4, 5, 30:

    magis impense,

    id. ib. 5, 9, 36.—With compp. adding to their force:

    magis est dulcius,

    Plaut. Stich. 5, 4, 22:

    magis majores nugae,

    id. Men. prol. 55:

    magis modum in majorem,

    id. Am. 1, 1, 145:

    contentiores mage erunt,

    id. Poen. 2, 15.—
    2.
    Strengthened.
    a.
    By etiam, multo, tanto, eo, hoc, quo, tam, quam; and negatively, nihilo:

    qualis in dicendo Hierocles Alabandeus, magis etiam Menecles, frater ejus, fuit,

    Cic. Brut. 95, 325; id. Off. 1, 21, 72:

    illud ad me, ac multo etiam magis ad vos,

    id. de Or. 2, 32, 139:

    tanto magis Dic, quis est?

    Plaut. Bacch. 3, 6, 28:

    ut quidque magis contemplor, tanto magis placet,

    id. Most. 3, 2, 146:

    vicina cacumina caelo, quam sint magis, tanto magis fument,

    Lucr. 6, 460:

    quanto ille plura miscebat, tanto hic magis in dies convalescebat,

    Cic. Mil. 9, 25:

    sed eo magis cauto est Opus, ne huc exeat, qui, etc.,

    Plaut. Most. 4, 2, 22:

    atque eo magis, si, etc.,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 3, 1, § 1:

    eoque magis quod, etc.,

    id. Lael. 2, 7; Caes. B. G. 1, 23; 1, 47; 3, 14;

    5, 1: immo vero etiam hoc magis, quam illi veteres, quod, etc.,

    Cic. Agr. 2, 35, 97:

    hoc vero magis properare Varro, ut, etc.,

    Caes. B. C. 2, 20:

    quo magis cogito ego cum meo animo,

    Plaut. Most. 3, 2, 13; Nep. Thras. 2:

    magis quam id reputo, tam magis uror,

    Plaut. Bacch. 5, 1, 5:

    tam magis illa fremens... Quam magis, etc.,

    Verg. A. 7, 787:

    quanto mage... tam magis,

    Lucr. 4, 81 sq.:

    quam magis in pectore meo foveo, quas meus filius turbas turbet... magis curae est magisque afformido, ne, etc.,

    Plaut. Bacch. 4, 10, 1; 4, 4, 27; id. Men. 1, 1, 19:

    quam magis te in altum capessis, tam aestus te in portum refert,

    id. As. 1, 3, 6:

    densior hinc suboles Quam magis, etc.,

    Verg. G. 3, 309:

    cum Vercingetorix nihilo magis in aequum locum descenderet,

    Caes. B. G. 6, 53.—
    b.
    By reduplication: magis magisque, magis et magis, magis ac magis; and poet. also, magis magis, more and more: ex desiderio magis magisque maceror, Afran. ap. Charis. p. 182 P.:

    cum cotidie magis magisque perditi homines tectis ac templis urbis minarentur,

    Cic. Phil. 1, 2, 5; id. Fam. 2, 18, 2; 16, 21, 2; Sall. C. 5, 7; cf. Cic. Fil. Fam. 16, 21, 2:

    de Graecia cotidie magis et magis cogito,

    Cic. Att. 14, 18, 4; 16, 3, 1; id. Brut. 90, 308; Liv. 7, 32, 6; Sall. J. 8, 6:

    magis deinde ac magis,

    Suet. Vit. 10:

    post hoc magis ac magis,

    id. Gram. 3;

    for which also: magisque ac magis deinceps,

    id. Tit. 3; Tac. A. 14, 8; Sen. de Ira, 3, 1, 4; id. Ep. 114, 25; id. Ben. 2, 14, 4; Plin. Ep. 1, 12, 10; 7, 3, 4; 10, 28, 3.— Poet. also:

    magis atque magis,

    Verg. A. 12, 239; Cat. 68, 48:

    post, vento crescente, magis magis increbescunt,

    id. 64, 275; cf. Verg. G. 4, 311.—
    3.
    Pleon.
    a.
    With potius (anteclass.):

    magis decorum'st Libertum potius quam patronum onus in via portare,

    Plaut. As. 3, 3, 99:

    mihi magis lubet cum probis potius quam cum improbis vivere,

    id. Trin. 2, 1, 38.—
    b.
    With malle: quam cum lego, nihil malo quam has res relinquere;

    his vero auditis multo magis,

    Cic. Tusc. 1, 31, 76:

    finge enim malle eum magis suum consequi quam, etc.,

    Dig. 17, 2, 52, § 10. —
    C.
    In partic.: non (neque) magis quam.
    1.
    To signify perfect equality between two enunciations, no more... than; just as much... as; or neg., no more... than; just as little... as:

    domus erat non domino magis ornamento quam civitati,

    i. e. just as much to the city as to its owner, Cic. Verr. 2, 4, 3, § 5; Planc. ap. Cic. Fam. 10, 4, 2:

    non Hannibale magis victo a se quam Q. Fabio,

    Liv. 22, 27, 2:

    conficior enim maerore, mea Terentia, nec me meae miseriae magis excruciant quam tuae vestraeque,

    Cic. Fam. 13, 3, 1; Liv. 9, 22.— Neg.: qui est enim animus in aliquo morbo... non magis est sanus, quam id corpus, quod in morbo est, i. e. is just as far from being sound as a body, etc., Cic. Tusc. 3, 5, 10:

    si aliqua in re Verris similis fuero, non magis mihi deerit inimicus quam Verri defuit,

    id. Verr. 2, 3, 69, § 162; id. Fam. 5, 12, 3; id. de Or. 2, 8, 31:

    non nascitur itaque ex malo bonum, non magis quam ficus ex olea,

    Sen. Ep. 87, 25;

    Quint. prooem. § 26: non magis Gaium imperaturum, quam per Baianum sinum equis discursurum,

    Suet. Calig. 19. —Ellipt.:

    nec eo magis lege liberi sunto,

    just as little from that as from the rest, Cic. Leg. 3, 4, 11.—
    2.
    For restricting the idea expressed in the clause with non magis, so that not more, according to a common figure of speech, = less; in Engl. not so much... as; less... than:

    deinde credas mihi affirmanti velim, me hoc non pro Lysone magis quam pro omnibus scribere,

    Cic. Fam. 13, 24; Planc. ap. Cic. Fam. 10, 17:

    miserebat non poenae magis homines, quam sceleris, quo poenam meriti essent,

    Liv. 2, 5; 1, 28.—
    3.
    Magis minusve, magis aut minus, or magis ac minus; post-Aug. for the usual plus minusve, more or less:

    sed istud magis minusve vitiosum est pro personis dicentium,

    Quint. 11, 1, 27; Plin. 17, 24, 37, § 220:

    minora vero plerumque sunt talia, ut pro persona, tempore, loco, causa magis ac minus vel excusata debeant videri vel reprehendenda,

    Quint. 11, 1, 14; Plin. 37, 5, 18, § 67:

    quaedam tamen et nationibus puto magis aut minus convenire,

    Sen. Ep. 40, 11; cf.:

    quosdam minus aut magis osos veritatem,

    id. Suas. 1, 5:

    aut minus, aut magis,

    id. Ep. 82, 14.—
    4.
    With alius... alio, etc.: ceterae philosophorum disciplinae, omnino alia magis alia, sed tamen omnes, one more than another, i. e. in different degrees, Cic. Fin. 3, 3, 11 Madvig. ad loc. (al.:

    alia magis, alia minus, v. Hand, Turs. III. p. 560): mihi videntur omnes quidem illi errasse... sed alius alio magis,

    Cic. Fin. 4, 16, 43:

    sunt omnino omnes fere similes, sed declarant communis notiones, alia magis alia,

    id. Tusc. 4, 24, 53:

    alii aliis magis recusare,

    Liv. 29, 15, 11.— Sup.: maxĭmē( maxŭmē), in the highest degree, most of all, most particularly, especially, exceedingly, very, etc.
    A.
    Lit.
    1.
    Alone.
    a.
    With a verb:

    haec una res in omni libero populo maximeque in pacatis tranquillisque civitatibus praecipue semper floruit,

    Cic. de Or. 1, 8, 30:

    quid commemorem primum aut laudem maxime?

    Ter. Eun. 5, 9, 14; 3, 1, 79:

    nos coluit maxime,

    id. Ad. 3, 2, 54:

    quem convenire maxime cupiebam,

    Plaut. Pers. 2, 4, 30; id. As. 3, 3, 133:

    de te audiebamus ea, quae maxime vellemus,

    Cic. Fam. 12, 25, a, 7; cf. id. Att. 13, 1:

    extra quos (fines) egredi non possim, si maxime velim,

    id. Quint. 10, 35:

    in re publica maxime conservanda sunt jura belli,

    most especially, id. Off. 1, 11, 33: huic legioni Caesar propter virtutem confidebat maxime, [p. 1101] Caes. B. G. 1, 40:

    quem Homero crederet maxime accedere,

    came nearest to, Quint. 10, 1, 86; cf.

    pugnare,

    most violently, Plaut. Am. 1, 1, 271; 1, 1, 44:

    jubere,

    most positively, id. Bacch. 4, 9, 80:

    id enim est profecto, quod constituta religione rem publicam contineat maxime,

    Cic. Leg. 2, 27, 69; cf. maxime fin.:

    ab eo exordiri volui maxime,

    id. Off. 1, 2, 4:

    cernere naturae vim maxime,

    id. Tusc. 1, 15, 35.—
    b.
    With an adj.:

    res maxime necessaria,

    Cic. Lael. 23, 86:

    loca maxime frumentaria,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 10:

    loci ad hoc maxime idonei,

    Quint. 1, 11, 13:

    maxime naturali carent amicitia,

    Cic. Lael. 21, 80:

    maxime feri,

    Caes. B. G. 2, 4:

    qui eo tempore maxime plebi acceptus erat,

    id. ib. 1, 3:

    idem ad augendam eloquentiam maxime accommodati erunt,

    Quint. 1, 11, 13:

    elegans maxime auctor,

    id. 10, 1, 93:

    maxime vero commune est quaerere, an sit honesta? etc.,

    id. 2, 4, 37:

    noto enim maxime utar exemplo,

    id. 7, 3, 3.—So with supp.:

    quae maxime liberalissima,

    Cic. Att. 12, 38, 3:

    maxime gravissimam omniumque (rerum),

    Liv. 41, 23, 4 MS. (dub.: maxumam gravissimamque, Weissenb.). —
    c.
    With numerals, at most:

    puer ad annos maxime natus octo,

    Gell. 17, 8, 4.—
    d.
    With an adv.:

    ut dicatis quam maxime ad veritatem accommodate,

    Cic. de Or. 1, 33, 149 (v. infra 2).—
    2.
    Strengthened by unus, unus omnium, omnium, multo, vel, tam, quam, etc. (supply potest):

    qui proelium unus maxime accenderat,

    Curt. 5, 2, 5:

    cum sua modestia unus omnium maxime floreret,

    Nep. Milt. 1, 1:

    quae maxime omnium belli avida,

    Liv. 23, 49; 4, 59; cf. Drak. ad Liv. 36, 19, 4:

    atque ea res multo maxime disjunxit illum ab illa,

    Ter. Hec. 1, 2, 85:

    imperium populi Romani multo maxime miserabile visum est,

    Sall. C. 36, 4:

    illud mihi videtur vel maxime confirmare, etc.,

    Cic. N. D. 2, 65, 162:

    hoc enim uno praestamus vel maxime feris,

    id. de Or. 1, 8, 32:

    quae quidem vel maxime suspicionem movent,

    id. Part. Or. 33, 114:

    quam potes, tam verba confer maxime ad compendium,

    as much as possible, Plaut. Mil. 3, 1, 186:

    ego jubeo quam maxime unam facere nos hanc familiam,

    Ter. Ad. 5, 8, 2:

    ut quam maxime permaneant diuturna corpora,

    Cic. Tusc. 1, 45, 108; id. de Or. 1, 34, 154:

    quo mihi rectius videtur, memoriam nostri quam maxime longam efficere,

    Sall. C. 1, 3:

    ceterum illum juvenem incipere a quam maxime facili ac favorabili causa velim,

    Quint. 12, 6, 6.—
    3.
    With the relative qui in the phrases, quam qui maxime and ut qui maxime:

    tam enim sum amicus rei publicae, quam qui maxime,

    as any one whatever, Cic. Fam. 5, 2, 6:

    grata ea res, ut quae maxime senatui umquam fuit,

    Liv. 5, 25; 7, 33.—
    4.
    With ut quisque... ita (maxime, potissimum or minime), the more... the more (or less):

    hoc maxime officii est, ut quisque maxime opis indigeat, ita ei potissimum opitulari,

    Cic. Off. 1, 15, 49:

    ut quisque magnitudine animae maxime excellit, ita maxime, etc.,

    id. ib. 1, 19, 64; cf.

    , in the contrary order: colendum autem esse ita quemque maxime, ut quisque maxime virtutibus his lenioribus erit ornatus,

    id. ib. 1, 15, 47:

    ut enim quisque maxime ad suum commodum refert, quaecumque agit, ita minime est vir bonus,

    id. Leg. 1, 18, 49.—
    5.
    In gradations, to denote the first and most desirable, first of all, in the first place:

    hujus industriam maxime quidem vellem, ut imitarentur ii, quos oportebat: secundo autem loco, ne alterius labori inviderent,

    Cic. Phil. 8, 10, 31; cf. id. Caecin. 9, 23:

    si per eum reductus insidiose redissem, me scilicet maxime sed proxime illum quoque fefellissem,

    id. Rab. Post. 12, 33:

    in quo genere sunt maxime oves, deinde caprae,

    Varr. R. R. 2, 9, 1:

    maxime... dein,

    Plin. 9, 16, 23, § 56:

    sed vitem maxime populus videtur alere, deinde ulmus, post etiam fraxinus,

    Col. 5, 6, 4:

    maxime... deinde... postea... minume,

    Plin. 37, 12, 75, § 196:

    maxime... postea... ultimae,

    Col. 6, 3, 6:

    post Chium maxime laudatur Creticum, mox Aegyptium,

    Plin. 18, 7, 17, § 77.—
    B.
    Transf.
    1.
    Like potissimum, to give prominence to an idea, especially, particularly, principally:

    quae ratio poetas, maximeque Homerum impulit, ut, etc.,

    Cic. N. D. 2, 6, 6; Varr. R. R. 1, 51, 1:

    scribe aliquid, et maxime, si Pompeius Italia cedit,

    Cic. Att. 7, 12, 4: de Cocceio et Libone quae scribis, approbo:

    maxime quod de judicatu meo,

    id. ib. 12, 19, 2; id. Fin. 5, 1, 1:

    cognoscat etiam rerum gestarum et memoriae veteris ordinem, maxime scilicet nostrae civitatis,

    id. Or. 34, 120; id. Att. 13, 1, 2.—So in the connection, cum... tum maxime; tum... tum maxime; ut... tum maxime, but more especially:

    scio et perspexi saepe: cum antehac, tum hodie maxime,

    Plaut. Mil. 4, 8, 56:

    plena exemplorum est nostra res publica, cum saepe, tum maxime bello Punico secundo,

    Cic. Off. 3, 11, 47; id. Att. 11, 6, 1; id. Fl. 38, 94:

    tum exercitationibus crebris atque magnis, tum scribendo maxime persequatur,

    id. de Or. 2, 23, 96:

    longius autem procedens, ut in ceteris eloquentiae partibus, tum maxime, etc.,

    id. Brut. 93, 320.— With nunc, nuper, tum, cum, just, precisely, exactly: Me. Quid? vostrum patri Filii quot eratis? M. Su. Ut nunc maxime memini, duo, just now, Plaut. Men. 5, 9, 58:

    cum iis, quos nuper maxime liberaverat,

    Caes. B. C. 3, 9:

    ipse tum maxime admoto igne refovebat artus,

    Curt. 8, 4, 25; 6, 6, 10; 5, 7, 2; Liv. 27, 4, 2 Drak.:

    haec cum maxime loqueretur, sex lictores eum circumsistunt valentissimi,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 5, 54, § 142; cf. id. ib. 2, 2, 76, § 187;

    2, 4, 38, § 72: totius autem injustitiae nulla capitalior, quam eorum, qui cum maxime fallunt, id agunt, ut viri boni esse videantur,

    id. Off. 1, 13, 41; Liv. 4, 3; 30, 33:

    tum cum maxime,

    at that precise time, at that moment, Liv. 40, 13, 4; 40, 32, 1; 33, 9, 3; 43, 7, 8; so,

    tunc cum maxime,

    Curt. 3, 2, 17:

    nunc cum maxime,

    Cic. Clu. 5, 12; id. Sen. 11, 38; Liv. 29, 17, 7; v. 2. cum.—
    2.
    In colloquial lang., to denote emphatic assent, certainly, by all means, very well, yes; and with immo, to express emphatic dissent, certainly not, by no means: Ar. Jace, pater, talos, ut porro nos jaciamus. De. Maxime, Plaut. As. 5, 2, 54; id. Curc. 2, 3, 36: Th. Nisi quid magis Es occupatus, operam mihi da. Si. Maxime, id. Most. 4, 3, 17; Ter. And. 4, 5, 23: Ca. Numquid peccatum est, Simo? Si. Immo maxime, Plaut. Ps. 1, 5, 80; Ter. Hec. 2, 1, 31:

    scilicet res ipsa aspera est, sed vos non timetis eam. Immo vero maxime,

    Sall. C. 52, 28 (v. immo); v. Hand, Turs. III. p. 552-607.
    2.
    Magnus, i, m., a Roman surname, e. g. Cn. Pompeius Magnus; v. Pompeius.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Magnus

  • 12 majores

    1.
    magnus, a, um (archaic gen. magnai for magnae:

    magnai reipublicai gratia,

    Plaut. Mil. 2, 1, 23), adj.; comp. mājor, us; sup. maxĭmus ( maxŭm-), a, um [root magh-; Sanscr. mahat, maba, great; Gr. megas; cf. meizôn for megiôn; cf. mêchos, majestas; also cf. root mak-; Gr. makros, and perh. makar], great, large.
    I.
    Lit., of physical size or quantity, great, large; of things, vast, extensive, spacious, etc.: nequam et magnus homo, a great, tall fellow, Lucil. ap. Varr. L. L. 7, § 32 Mull.; cf.

    the double meaning: tu, bis denis grandia libris Qui scribis Priami proelia, magnus homo es,

    a great man, Mart. 9, 51, 4: magna ossa lacertique Apparent homini, Lucil. ap. Macr. S. 6, 1:

    magna ossa lacertosque Exuit,

    Verg. A. 5, 422: (scarus) magnusque bonusque, Enn. ap. App. Mag. p. 299 (Heduph. v. 9 Vahl.): indu mari magno, id. ap. Macr. 6, 2 (Ann. v. 425 Vahl.); so, in mari magno, id. ap. Fest. p. 356 Mull.; cf. Lucr. 2, 554:

    magnus fluens Nilus,

    Verg. G. 3, 28; Sen. Q. N. 4, 2, 2:

    magna et pulcra domus,

    spacious, Cic. N. D. 2, 6, 17:

    montes,

    Cat. 64. 280; cf. Olympum, Enn. ap. Varr. L. L. 7, § 20 Mull. (Ann. v. 1 Vahl.):

    templa caelitum,

    vast, id. ib. 7, § 6 (Trag. v. 227 Vahl.): magnae quercus, great oaks, lofty oaks, id. ap. Macr. S. 6, 2 (Ann. v. 194 Vahl.):

    aquae,

    great floods, inundations, Liv. 24, 9: saxa maxima, Enn. ap. Cic. Tusc. 1, 16, 37:

    oppidum maximum,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 23.—
    B.
    Esp.
    1.
    Of measure, weight, quantity, great, much, abundant, considerable, etc.:

    maximum pondus auri, magnum numerum frumenti, vim mellis maximam exportasse,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 2, 72, § 176:

    magna pecunia mutua,

    id. Att. 11, 3, 3:

    copia pabuli,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 16:

    multitudo peditatus,

    id. ib. 4, 34:

    divitiae,

    Nep. Dion. 1, 2:

    populus,

    Verg. A. 1, 148.—
    2.
    Rarely of time, for longus, multus:

    interea magnum sol circumvolvitur annum,

    Verg. A. 3, 284:

    magnum vocans solis (annum) comparatione lunaris,

    Macr. S. 2, 11:

    magno post tempore,

    Just. 11, 10, 14; 32, 3, 10.—
    3.
    Of the voice, loud, powerful, strong, mighty:

    magna voce confiteri,

    Cic. Caecin. 32, 92: major pars, the majority:

    tribunorum,

    Liv. 9, 46, 7.
    II.
    Trop.
    A.
    In gen., great, grand, mighty, noble, lofty, important, of great weight or importance, momentous: cum magnis dis, Enn. ap. Cic. Off. 1, 12, 38 (Ann. v. 207 Vahl.); cf.: Saturnia magna dearum, id. ap. Prisc. p. 1103 P. (Ann. v. 482 Vahl.):

    vir magnus in primis,

    Cic. N. D. 1, 43, 120:

    nemo igitur vir magnus sine aliquo adflatu divino umquam fuit,

    id. ib. 2, 66, 167:

    magnus hoc bello Themistocles fuit, nec minor in pace,

    Nep. Them. 6, 1:

    Cato clarus atque magnus habetur,

    Sall. C. 53, 1:

    amicus,

    great, wealthy, Juv. 6, 312: res magnas parvasque Eloqui, Enn. ap. Gell. 12, 4 (Ann. v. 244 Vahl.):

    virtus,

    Caes. B. G. 2, 15:

    infamia,

    Cic. Fam. 1, 1:

    eloquentia, gravitas, studium, contentio,

    id. ib.:

    multo major alacritas, studiumque pugnandi majus,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 46:

    causa,

    great, important, weighty, Cic. Dom. 1, 1:

    opus et arduum,

    id. Or. 10, 33.— Absol. in neutr, sing. and plur.:

    quamquam id magnum, et arduum est,

    something great, Cic. Fam. 6, 7, 6: magna Di curant ( great things, important matters), parva neglegunt, id. N. D. 2, 66, 167:

    magna loqui,

    to say great things, speak boastfully, Tib. 2, 6, 11:

    magnum est efficere, ut quis intellegat, quid sit illud, etc.,

    it is a great, difficult, important thing, Cic. Ac. 1, 2, 7:

    probitatem vel in eis, quos numquam vidimus, vel, quod majus est, in hoste etiam diligimus,

    what is far greater, id. Lael. 9, 29: annus magnus, the great year, at the end of which the sun, moon, and planets were supposed to return to the same relative positions, the Piatonic year or cycle, consisting of 15000 years:

    quarum (stellarum) ex disparibus motionibus, magnum annum mathematici nominaverunt, etc.,

    Cic. N. D. 2, 20, 52; id. Fragm. ap. Tac. Or. 16.— Posit. in comparison: Alexander orbi magnus est, Alex. andro orbis angustus, great in comparison with, i. e. too great for, Sen. Suas. 1, 3.—
    B.
    In partic.
    1.
    Of age, with natu, advanced in years, of great age, aged:

    jam magno natu,

    Nep. Paus. 5; Liv. 3, 71, 3:

    homo magnus natu,

    id. 10, 38, 6.—Usually in the comp. and sup., with or without natu or annis, older, the elder, the oldest or eldest:

    qui (Livius) fuit major natu quam Plautus et Naevius,

    older than, earlier, Cic. Tusc. 1, 1, 3:

    audivi ex majoribus natu,

    id. Off. 1, 30, 109:

    hic una e multis, quae maxima natu, Pyrgo,

    Verg. A. 5, 644:

    annos natus major quadraginta,

    more than, Cic. Rosc. Am. 14, 39:

    civis major annis viginti,

    Suet. Caes. 42:

    cum liberis, majoribus quam quindecim annos natis,

    Liv. 45, 32.— Absol.: senis nostri frater major, the elder of two, Ter. Phorm. 1, 2, 13:

    ex duobus filiis major, Caes B. C. 3, 108, 3: Fabii Ambusti filiae duae nuptae, Ser. Sulpicio major minor Licinio Stoloni erat,

    Liv. 6, 34:

    Gelo maximus stirpis,

    id. 23, 30:

    ut nubere vellet mulier viro, major juniori,

    App. Mag. 27, p. 291, 28; cf.

    in gen.: Cyrus major,

    Lact. 4, 5, 7:

    quaerere uter major aetate fuerit, Homerus an Hesiodus, cum minor Hecuba fuerit quam Helena,

    Sen. Ep. 88, 5.—In legal lang., major (opp. minor), one who has attained his twenty-fifth year, who is of age:

    si minor negotiis majoris intervenerit,

    Dig. 4, 4, 24.—In plur. subst.: mājō-res, um, m., adults (opp. pueri), Varr. L. L. 9, 10, § 16 Mull.—But usually majores, ancestors, forefathers:

    Itan tandem hanc majores famam tradiderunt tibi tui, Ut, etc.,

    Plaut. Trin. 3, 2, 16:

    ibi mei sunt majores siti, pater, avos, proavos, abavos,

    id. Mil. 2, 4, 20:

    L. Philippus, vir patre, avo, majoribus suis dignissimus,

    Cic. Phil. 3, 10, 25:

    patres majoresque nostri,

    id. Div. in Caecil. 21, 69:

    more majorum,

    id. Att. 1, 1, 1:

    spes tamen una est, aliquando populum Romanum majorum similem fore,

    id. Fam. 12, 22, 2:

    majores natu,

    Nep. Iphicr. 1, 1:

    maxima virgo,

    the eldest of the Vestal virgins, Ov. F. 4, 639: major erus, the old master, the master of the house, the old man (opp.: minor erus, the young master): Le. Ubinam est erus? Li. Major apud forum'st, minor hic est intus, Plaut. As. 2, 2, 63: majores natu, of the Senate:

    de istis rebus in patria majores natu consulemus,

    Liv. 1, 32, 10.—In designating relationship, magnus denotes kindred of the fourth, major of the fifth, and maximus of the sixth degree; so, avunculus magnus, a great-uncle; amita magna, a greataunt; avunculus or amita major; avunculus maximus, amita maxima, etc.; v. h. vv., and cf. Dig. 38, 10, 10.—
    2.
    In specifications of value, in the neutr. absol., magni or magno, high, dear, of great value, at a high price, etc.; cf.: pretii majoris or maximi, higher, highest, very high:

    magni esse,

    to be highly esteemed, Cic. Fam. 13, 72, 2:

    magni aestimare,

    id. Tusc. 5, 7, 20:

    magni existimans interesse ad decus,

    to be of great consequence, id. N. D. 1, 4, 7:

    emere agros poterunt quam volent magno,

    id. Agr. 2, 13, 34:

    magno vendere,

    id. Verr. 2, 3, 30, § 71:

    conducere aliquid nimium magno,

    too high, too dear, id. Att. 1, 17, 9:

    magno illi ea cunctatio stetit,

    cost him dear, Liv. 2, 36.— Comp.:

    ornatus muliebris majoris pretii,

    Cic. Inv 1, 31, 51, rarely without pretii:

    multo majoris alapae mecum veneunt,

    dearer, higher, Phaedr. 2, 5, 25.— Sup.: te haec solum semper fecit maxumi, most highly prized, Ter And. 1, 5, 58:

    senatus auctoritatem sibi maximi videri,

    Cic. Att. 1, 14, 2: in majus, too greatly, too highly, greater than it is:

    extollere aliquid in majus,

    more highly than it deserves, Tac. A. 15, 30:

    celebrare,

    id. ib. 13, 8:

    nuntiare,

    id. H. 3, 38:

    credere,

    to believe a thing to be worse than it is, id. ib. 1, 18:

    accipere,

    to take a thing to be greater than it is, id. ib. 3, 8 init.: innotescere, in an exaggerated manner, id. ib 4, 50.—Also with abl., in majus vero ferri, Liv. 21, 32, 7.—
    3.
    Magnum and maximum, adverbially, greatly, loudly (ante- and post-class.):

    magnum clamat,

    greatly, with a loud voice, aloud, Plaut. Mil. 3, 2, 10:

    inclamare,

    Gell. 5, 9 fin.:

    exclamat derepente maximum,

    Plaut. Most. 2, 2, 57.—Hence, măgis, adv., only in comp. in this anomalous form (i. e. mag-ius, like pris-cus for [p. 1100] prius-cus, and pris-tinus for prius-tinus); and in sup.: maxĭmē ( maxŭmē).
    A.
    Comp.: magĭs (apocop. form, măgĕ, Plaut. As. 1, 1, 51; 2, 3, 14; id. Mon. 2, 3, 35; id. Poen. 1, 2, 64; 1, 2, 14; id. Trin. 4, 3, 46; id. Truc. 1, 2, 75; 3, 1, 17; 4, 4, 34; Lucr. 4, 81; 756; 5, 1203; Prop. 1, 11, 9; 3 (4), 14, 2; 4 (5), 8, 16; Verg. A. 10, 481; Sol. 22 fin.; but in Enn. ap. Cic. Fam. 7, 13, 2, magis or magi'. Acc. to Serv. Verg. A. 10, 481, Cicero in the Frumentaria wrote: mage condemnatum hominum in judicium adducere non posse), in a higher degree, more completely, more (for the difference between magis, plus, potius, and amplius, v. amplius).—
    B.
    In gen.
    1.
    With no qualifying words.
    a.
    With the addition of the second term of the comparison.
    (α).
    With verbs:

    quae (facinora) istaec aetas fugere magis quam sectari solet,

    Plaut. Mil. 3, 1, 28:

    saliendo sese exercebant magis, quam scorto aut saviis,

    id. Bacch. 3, 3, 25; id. Pers. 4, 4, 108; 86:

    magis honorem tribuere quam salutem accipere,

    Caes. B. G. 7, 20, 7:

    nisi forte magis erit parricida, si qui consularem patrem, quam si quis humilem necarit,

    Cic. Mil. 7, 17:

    magis ut consuetudinem servem, quam quod, etc.,

    id. Clu. 32, 89.—Repeated:

    quam magis exhausto spumaverit ubere mulctra, Laeta magis pressis manabunt flumina mammis, i. e. quo magis,... eo magis,

    Verg. G. 3, 309 sq.; cf.:

    tam magis illa fremens... quam magis effuso crudescunt sanguine pugnae,

    id. ib. 7, 787 sq.; v. Hand, Turs. III. p. 566.—Magis est, quod or ut, there is greater reason, there is more cause that, etc.:

    quamobrem etsi magis est, quod gratuler tibi, quam quod te rogem: tamen etiam rogo, etc.,

    Cic. Att. 16, 5, 2:

    magis est, ut ipse moleste ferat, errasse se, quam ut, etc.,

    id. Cael. 6, 14.—
    (β).
    With substt., usu. with quam: tu me amoris magis quam honoris servavisti gratia, Poet. ap. Cic. Tusc. 4, 32, 69: bellipotentes sunt magi' quam sapientipotentes, Enn. ap. Cic. Div. 2, 56, 116 (Ann. v. 188 Vahl.):

    umbra es amantum magis quam amator,

    Plaut. Mil. 3, 1, 31:

    magis adeo id facilitate quam alia ulla culpa mea contigit,

    Cic. de Or. 2, 4, 15:

    aditus ad consulatum non magis nobilitati quam virtuti pateret,

    id. Mur. 8, 17:

    magis ratione et consilio quam virtute vicisse,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 40, 8; cf.:

    ut magis virtute quam dolo contenderent,

    id. ib. 1, 13, 6:

    se magis consuetudine sua quam merito eorum civitatem conservaturum,

    id. ib. 2, 32, 1:

    timori magis quam religioni consulere,

    id. B. C. 1, 67, 3:

    jus bonumque apud eos non legibus magis quam natura valebat,

    Sall. C. 9, 1:

    non duces magis quam milites callent (obsistere, etc.),

    Curt. 3, 2, 14.—And after negatives: non magis quam, as little as:

    in dicendo irasci, dolere... non sunt figurae, non magis quam suadere,

    Quint. 9, 1, 23:

    Romanos nec magis jam dolo capi quam armis vinci posse,

    Liv. 10, 4, 10:

    pro certo habens non magis Antonio eripi se quam Caesari Brutum posse,

    Sen. Suas. 6, 17:

    non magis Alexandri saevitiam quam Bessi parricidium ferre potuisse,

    Curt. 7, 6, 15; cf.:

    nec magis post proelium quam in proelio caedibus temperatum est,

    Liv. 2, 16, 9. —Followed by atque instead of quam (rare):

    non Apollinis magis verum atque hoc responsum est,

    Ter. And. 4, 2, 15.— With the comp. abl. (rare):

    quid philosophia magis colendum?

    Cic. Fin. 3, 22, 76:

    quanto magis Aliensi die Aliam ipsam reformidaturos?

    Liv. 6, 28, 6 Weissenb. ad loc.:

    quam Juno fertur terris magis omnibus unam... coluisse,

    Verg. A. 1, 15 (cf. B. 3. infra):

    Albanum sive Falernum Te magis appositis delectat,

    Hor. S. 2, 8, 17.—
    (γ).
    With pronn.:

    quid habetis, qui mage immortales vos credam esse quam ego siem?

    Plaut. Poen. 1, 2, 64:

    quis homo sit magis meus quam tu es?

    id. Mil. 3, 1, 20:

    quam mage amo quam matrem meam,

    id. Truc. 3, 1, 17; cf.:

    quem ego ecastor mage amo quam me,

    id. ib. 4, 4, 34.—With utrum, followed by an:

    jam scibo, utrum haec me mage amet, an marsupium,

    Plaut. Men. 2, 3, 35.—With the abl. instead of quam:

    nec magis hac infra quicquam est in corpore nostro,

    Lucr. 3, 274; Verg. A. 1, 15.—
    (δ).
    With adjj. and advv., and esp. with those which do not admit the comparative termination (most freq. without adding the second term of the comparison; v. under b. d): numquam potuisti mihi Magis opportunus advenire quam advenis, Plaut. Most. 3, 1, 47:

    neque lac lacti magis est simile, quam ille ego similis est mei,

    id. Am. 2, 1, 54:

    ars magis magna atque uber, quam difficilis et obscura,

    Cic. de Or. 1, 42, 190:

    corpora magna magis quam firma,

    Liv. 5, 44, 4:

    vultu pulchro magis quam venusto,

    Suet. Ner. 51.—With the abl., Plaut. As. 3, 3, 114:

    neque ego hoc homine quemquam vidi magis malum,

    id. Ps. 4, 1, 27:

    ab secundis rebus magis etiam solito incauti,

    Liv. 5, 44, 6.—With compp. (adding to their force):

    ita fustibus sum mollior miser magis quam ullus cinaedus,

    Plaut. Aul. 3, 2, 8. —
    b.
    Without the addition of the second term.
    (α).
    With verbs: ergo plusque magisque viri nunc gloria claret, Enn. ap. Macr. S. 6, 1 (Ann. v. 315 Vahl.):

    sapiunt magis,

    Plaut. Bacch. 3, 3, 4:

    magis curae est, magisque afformido, ne, etc.,

    id. ib. 4, 10, 3:

    magis metuant,

    id. Mil. 5, 44:

    tum magis id diceres, Fanni, si, etc.,

    Cic. Lael. 7 fin.; cf. id. Rep. 1, 40, 62:

    cum Pompeius ita contendisset, ut nihil umquam magis,

    id. Fam. 1, 9, 20:

    magis velle, for malle: quod magis vellem evenire,

    Ter. Eun. 5, 7, 1; Val. Fl. 3, 270.—
    (β).
    With substt.: non ex jure manum consertum sed magi' ferro, Enn. ap. Gell. 20, 10 (Ann. v. 276 Vahl.):

    magis aedilis fieri non potuisset,

    better, finer, Cic. Planc. 24, 60.—
    (γ).
    With pronn.:

    ecastor neminem hodie mage Amat corde atque animo suo,

    Plaut. Truc. 1, 2, 75.—
    (δ).
    With adjj. and advv. (so most freq.).—With adjj.:

    ut quadam magis necessaria ratione recte sit vivendum,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 3, 1, § 2:

    magis anxius,

    Ov. M. 1, 182:

    hic magis tranquillu'st,

    Plaut. Bacch. 5, 2, 55:

    nihil videtur mundius, nec magis compositum quicquam, nec magis elegans,

    Ter. Eun. 5, 4, 12:

    nemo fuit magis severus nec magis continens,

    id. ib. 2, 1, 21:

    quod est magis verisimile,

    Caes. B. G. 3, 13, 6:

    magis admirabilis oratio,

    Quint. 8, 3, 24:

    magis communia verba,

    id. 8, 2, 24 et saep.; rare: magis quam in aliis = praeter ceteros;

    nescio quo pacto magis quam in aliis suum cuique pulchrum est,

    Cic. Tusc. 5, 22, 63.— With advv.:

    magis aperte,

    Ter. Ad. 4, 5, 30:

    magis impense,

    id. ib. 5, 9, 36.—With compp. adding to their force:

    magis est dulcius,

    Plaut. Stich. 5, 4, 22:

    magis majores nugae,

    id. Men. prol. 55:

    magis modum in majorem,

    id. Am. 1, 1, 145:

    contentiores mage erunt,

    id. Poen. 2, 15.—
    2.
    Strengthened.
    a.
    By etiam, multo, tanto, eo, hoc, quo, tam, quam; and negatively, nihilo:

    qualis in dicendo Hierocles Alabandeus, magis etiam Menecles, frater ejus, fuit,

    Cic. Brut. 95, 325; id. Off. 1, 21, 72:

    illud ad me, ac multo etiam magis ad vos,

    id. de Or. 2, 32, 139:

    tanto magis Dic, quis est?

    Plaut. Bacch. 3, 6, 28:

    ut quidque magis contemplor, tanto magis placet,

    id. Most. 3, 2, 146:

    vicina cacumina caelo, quam sint magis, tanto magis fument,

    Lucr. 6, 460:

    quanto ille plura miscebat, tanto hic magis in dies convalescebat,

    Cic. Mil. 9, 25:

    sed eo magis cauto est Opus, ne huc exeat, qui, etc.,

    Plaut. Most. 4, 2, 22:

    atque eo magis, si, etc.,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 3, 1, § 1:

    eoque magis quod, etc.,

    id. Lael. 2, 7; Caes. B. G. 1, 23; 1, 47; 3, 14;

    5, 1: immo vero etiam hoc magis, quam illi veteres, quod, etc.,

    Cic. Agr. 2, 35, 97:

    hoc vero magis properare Varro, ut, etc.,

    Caes. B. C. 2, 20:

    quo magis cogito ego cum meo animo,

    Plaut. Most. 3, 2, 13; Nep. Thras. 2:

    magis quam id reputo, tam magis uror,

    Plaut. Bacch. 5, 1, 5:

    tam magis illa fremens... Quam magis, etc.,

    Verg. A. 7, 787:

    quanto mage... tam magis,

    Lucr. 4, 81 sq.:

    quam magis in pectore meo foveo, quas meus filius turbas turbet... magis curae est magisque afformido, ne, etc.,

    Plaut. Bacch. 4, 10, 1; 4, 4, 27; id. Men. 1, 1, 19:

    quam magis te in altum capessis, tam aestus te in portum refert,

    id. As. 1, 3, 6:

    densior hinc suboles Quam magis, etc.,

    Verg. G. 3, 309:

    cum Vercingetorix nihilo magis in aequum locum descenderet,

    Caes. B. G. 6, 53.—
    b.
    By reduplication: magis magisque, magis et magis, magis ac magis; and poet. also, magis magis, more and more: ex desiderio magis magisque maceror, Afran. ap. Charis. p. 182 P.:

    cum cotidie magis magisque perditi homines tectis ac templis urbis minarentur,

    Cic. Phil. 1, 2, 5; id. Fam. 2, 18, 2; 16, 21, 2; Sall. C. 5, 7; cf. Cic. Fil. Fam. 16, 21, 2:

    de Graecia cotidie magis et magis cogito,

    Cic. Att. 14, 18, 4; 16, 3, 1; id. Brut. 90, 308; Liv. 7, 32, 6; Sall. J. 8, 6:

    magis deinde ac magis,

    Suet. Vit. 10:

    post hoc magis ac magis,

    id. Gram. 3;

    for which also: magisque ac magis deinceps,

    id. Tit. 3; Tac. A. 14, 8; Sen. de Ira, 3, 1, 4; id. Ep. 114, 25; id. Ben. 2, 14, 4; Plin. Ep. 1, 12, 10; 7, 3, 4; 10, 28, 3.— Poet. also:

    magis atque magis,

    Verg. A. 12, 239; Cat. 68, 48:

    post, vento crescente, magis magis increbescunt,

    id. 64, 275; cf. Verg. G. 4, 311.—
    3.
    Pleon.
    a.
    With potius (anteclass.):

    magis decorum'st Libertum potius quam patronum onus in via portare,

    Plaut. As. 3, 3, 99:

    mihi magis lubet cum probis potius quam cum improbis vivere,

    id. Trin. 2, 1, 38.—
    b.
    With malle: quam cum lego, nihil malo quam has res relinquere;

    his vero auditis multo magis,

    Cic. Tusc. 1, 31, 76:

    finge enim malle eum magis suum consequi quam, etc.,

    Dig. 17, 2, 52, § 10. —
    C.
    In partic.: non (neque) magis quam.
    1.
    To signify perfect equality between two enunciations, no more... than; just as much... as; or neg., no more... than; just as little... as:

    domus erat non domino magis ornamento quam civitati,

    i. e. just as much to the city as to its owner, Cic. Verr. 2, 4, 3, § 5; Planc. ap. Cic. Fam. 10, 4, 2:

    non Hannibale magis victo a se quam Q. Fabio,

    Liv. 22, 27, 2:

    conficior enim maerore, mea Terentia, nec me meae miseriae magis excruciant quam tuae vestraeque,

    Cic. Fam. 13, 3, 1; Liv. 9, 22.— Neg.: qui est enim animus in aliquo morbo... non magis est sanus, quam id corpus, quod in morbo est, i. e. is just as far from being sound as a body, etc., Cic. Tusc. 3, 5, 10:

    si aliqua in re Verris similis fuero, non magis mihi deerit inimicus quam Verri defuit,

    id. Verr. 2, 3, 69, § 162; id. Fam. 5, 12, 3; id. de Or. 2, 8, 31:

    non nascitur itaque ex malo bonum, non magis quam ficus ex olea,

    Sen. Ep. 87, 25;

    Quint. prooem. § 26: non magis Gaium imperaturum, quam per Baianum sinum equis discursurum,

    Suet. Calig. 19. —Ellipt.:

    nec eo magis lege liberi sunto,

    just as little from that as from the rest, Cic. Leg. 3, 4, 11.—
    2.
    For restricting the idea expressed in the clause with non magis, so that not more, according to a common figure of speech, = less; in Engl. not so much... as; less... than:

    deinde credas mihi affirmanti velim, me hoc non pro Lysone magis quam pro omnibus scribere,

    Cic. Fam. 13, 24; Planc. ap. Cic. Fam. 10, 17:

    miserebat non poenae magis homines, quam sceleris, quo poenam meriti essent,

    Liv. 2, 5; 1, 28.—
    3.
    Magis minusve, magis aut minus, or magis ac minus; post-Aug. for the usual plus minusve, more or less:

    sed istud magis minusve vitiosum est pro personis dicentium,

    Quint. 11, 1, 27; Plin. 17, 24, 37, § 220:

    minora vero plerumque sunt talia, ut pro persona, tempore, loco, causa magis ac minus vel excusata debeant videri vel reprehendenda,

    Quint. 11, 1, 14; Plin. 37, 5, 18, § 67:

    quaedam tamen et nationibus puto magis aut minus convenire,

    Sen. Ep. 40, 11; cf.:

    quosdam minus aut magis osos veritatem,

    id. Suas. 1, 5:

    aut minus, aut magis,

    id. Ep. 82, 14.—
    4.
    With alius... alio, etc.: ceterae philosophorum disciplinae, omnino alia magis alia, sed tamen omnes, one more than another, i. e. in different degrees, Cic. Fin. 3, 3, 11 Madvig. ad loc. (al.:

    alia magis, alia minus, v. Hand, Turs. III. p. 560): mihi videntur omnes quidem illi errasse... sed alius alio magis,

    Cic. Fin. 4, 16, 43:

    sunt omnino omnes fere similes, sed declarant communis notiones, alia magis alia,

    id. Tusc. 4, 24, 53:

    alii aliis magis recusare,

    Liv. 29, 15, 11.— Sup.: maxĭmē( maxŭmē), in the highest degree, most of all, most particularly, especially, exceedingly, very, etc.
    A.
    Lit.
    1.
    Alone.
    a.
    With a verb:

    haec una res in omni libero populo maximeque in pacatis tranquillisque civitatibus praecipue semper floruit,

    Cic. de Or. 1, 8, 30:

    quid commemorem primum aut laudem maxime?

    Ter. Eun. 5, 9, 14; 3, 1, 79:

    nos coluit maxime,

    id. Ad. 3, 2, 54:

    quem convenire maxime cupiebam,

    Plaut. Pers. 2, 4, 30; id. As. 3, 3, 133:

    de te audiebamus ea, quae maxime vellemus,

    Cic. Fam. 12, 25, a, 7; cf. id. Att. 13, 1:

    extra quos (fines) egredi non possim, si maxime velim,

    id. Quint. 10, 35:

    in re publica maxime conservanda sunt jura belli,

    most especially, id. Off. 1, 11, 33: huic legioni Caesar propter virtutem confidebat maxime, [p. 1101] Caes. B. G. 1, 40:

    quem Homero crederet maxime accedere,

    came nearest to, Quint. 10, 1, 86; cf.

    pugnare,

    most violently, Plaut. Am. 1, 1, 271; 1, 1, 44:

    jubere,

    most positively, id. Bacch. 4, 9, 80:

    id enim est profecto, quod constituta religione rem publicam contineat maxime,

    Cic. Leg. 2, 27, 69; cf. maxime fin.:

    ab eo exordiri volui maxime,

    id. Off. 1, 2, 4:

    cernere naturae vim maxime,

    id. Tusc. 1, 15, 35.—
    b.
    With an adj.:

    res maxime necessaria,

    Cic. Lael. 23, 86:

    loca maxime frumentaria,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 10:

    loci ad hoc maxime idonei,

    Quint. 1, 11, 13:

    maxime naturali carent amicitia,

    Cic. Lael. 21, 80:

    maxime feri,

    Caes. B. G. 2, 4:

    qui eo tempore maxime plebi acceptus erat,

    id. ib. 1, 3:

    idem ad augendam eloquentiam maxime accommodati erunt,

    Quint. 1, 11, 13:

    elegans maxime auctor,

    id. 10, 1, 93:

    maxime vero commune est quaerere, an sit honesta? etc.,

    id. 2, 4, 37:

    noto enim maxime utar exemplo,

    id. 7, 3, 3.—So with supp.:

    quae maxime liberalissima,

    Cic. Att. 12, 38, 3:

    maxime gravissimam omniumque (rerum),

    Liv. 41, 23, 4 MS. (dub.: maxumam gravissimamque, Weissenb.). —
    c.
    With numerals, at most:

    puer ad annos maxime natus octo,

    Gell. 17, 8, 4.—
    d.
    With an adv.:

    ut dicatis quam maxime ad veritatem accommodate,

    Cic. de Or. 1, 33, 149 (v. infra 2).—
    2.
    Strengthened by unus, unus omnium, omnium, multo, vel, tam, quam, etc. (supply potest):

    qui proelium unus maxime accenderat,

    Curt. 5, 2, 5:

    cum sua modestia unus omnium maxime floreret,

    Nep. Milt. 1, 1:

    quae maxime omnium belli avida,

    Liv. 23, 49; 4, 59; cf. Drak. ad Liv. 36, 19, 4:

    atque ea res multo maxime disjunxit illum ab illa,

    Ter. Hec. 1, 2, 85:

    imperium populi Romani multo maxime miserabile visum est,

    Sall. C. 36, 4:

    illud mihi videtur vel maxime confirmare, etc.,

    Cic. N. D. 2, 65, 162:

    hoc enim uno praestamus vel maxime feris,

    id. de Or. 1, 8, 32:

    quae quidem vel maxime suspicionem movent,

    id. Part. Or. 33, 114:

    quam potes, tam verba confer maxime ad compendium,

    as much as possible, Plaut. Mil. 3, 1, 186:

    ego jubeo quam maxime unam facere nos hanc familiam,

    Ter. Ad. 5, 8, 2:

    ut quam maxime permaneant diuturna corpora,

    Cic. Tusc. 1, 45, 108; id. de Or. 1, 34, 154:

    quo mihi rectius videtur, memoriam nostri quam maxime longam efficere,

    Sall. C. 1, 3:

    ceterum illum juvenem incipere a quam maxime facili ac favorabili causa velim,

    Quint. 12, 6, 6.—
    3.
    With the relative qui in the phrases, quam qui maxime and ut qui maxime:

    tam enim sum amicus rei publicae, quam qui maxime,

    as any one whatever, Cic. Fam. 5, 2, 6:

    grata ea res, ut quae maxime senatui umquam fuit,

    Liv. 5, 25; 7, 33.—
    4.
    With ut quisque... ita (maxime, potissimum or minime), the more... the more (or less):

    hoc maxime officii est, ut quisque maxime opis indigeat, ita ei potissimum opitulari,

    Cic. Off. 1, 15, 49:

    ut quisque magnitudine animae maxime excellit, ita maxime, etc.,

    id. ib. 1, 19, 64; cf.

    , in the contrary order: colendum autem esse ita quemque maxime, ut quisque maxime virtutibus his lenioribus erit ornatus,

    id. ib. 1, 15, 47:

    ut enim quisque maxime ad suum commodum refert, quaecumque agit, ita minime est vir bonus,

    id. Leg. 1, 18, 49.—
    5.
    In gradations, to denote the first and most desirable, first of all, in the first place:

    hujus industriam maxime quidem vellem, ut imitarentur ii, quos oportebat: secundo autem loco, ne alterius labori inviderent,

    Cic. Phil. 8, 10, 31; cf. id. Caecin. 9, 23:

    si per eum reductus insidiose redissem, me scilicet maxime sed proxime illum quoque fefellissem,

    id. Rab. Post. 12, 33:

    in quo genere sunt maxime oves, deinde caprae,

    Varr. R. R. 2, 9, 1:

    maxime... dein,

    Plin. 9, 16, 23, § 56:

    sed vitem maxime populus videtur alere, deinde ulmus, post etiam fraxinus,

    Col. 5, 6, 4:

    maxime... deinde... postea... minume,

    Plin. 37, 12, 75, § 196:

    maxime... postea... ultimae,

    Col. 6, 3, 6:

    post Chium maxime laudatur Creticum, mox Aegyptium,

    Plin. 18, 7, 17, § 77.—
    B.
    Transf.
    1.
    Like potissimum, to give prominence to an idea, especially, particularly, principally:

    quae ratio poetas, maximeque Homerum impulit, ut, etc.,

    Cic. N. D. 2, 6, 6; Varr. R. R. 1, 51, 1:

    scribe aliquid, et maxime, si Pompeius Italia cedit,

    Cic. Att. 7, 12, 4: de Cocceio et Libone quae scribis, approbo:

    maxime quod de judicatu meo,

    id. ib. 12, 19, 2; id. Fin. 5, 1, 1:

    cognoscat etiam rerum gestarum et memoriae veteris ordinem, maxime scilicet nostrae civitatis,

    id. Or. 34, 120; id. Att. 13, 1, 2.—So in the connection, cum... tum maxime; tum... tum maxime; ut... tum maxime, but more especially:

    scio et perspexi saepe: cum antehac, tum hodie maxime,

    Plaut. Mil. 4, 8, 56:

    plena exemplorum est nostra res publica, cum saepe, tum maxime bello Punico secundo,

    Cic. Off. 3, 11, 47; id. Att. 11, 6, 1; id. Fl. 38, 94:

    tum exercitationibus crebris atque magnis, tum scribendo maxime persequatur,

    id. de Or. 2, 23, 96:

    longius autem procedens, ut in ceteris eloquentiae partibus, tum maxime, etc.,

    id. Brut. 93, 320.— With nunc, nuper, tum, cum, just, precisely, exactly: Me. Quid? vostrum patri Filii quot eratis? M. Su. Ut nunc maxime memini, duo, just now, Plaut. Men. 5, 9, 58:

    cum iis, quos nuper maxime liberaverat,

    Caes. B. C. 3, 9:

    ipse tum maxime admoto igne refovebat artus,

    Curt. 8, 4, 25; 6, 6, 10; 5, 7, 2; Liv. 27, 4, 2 Drak.:

    haec cum maxime loqueretur, sex lictores eum circumsistunt valentissimi,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 5, 54, § 142; cf. id. ib. 2, 2, 76, § 187;

    2, 4, 38, § 72: totius autem injustitiae nulla capitalior, quam eorum, qui cum maxime fallunt, id agunt, ut viri boni esse videantur,

    id. Off. 1, 13, 41; Liv. 4, 3; 30, 33:

    tum cum maxime,

    at that precise time, at that moment, Liv. 40, 13, 4; 40, 32, 1; 33, 9, 3; 43, 7, 8; so,

    tunc cum maxime,

    Curt. 3, 2, 17:

    nunc cum maxime,

    Cic. Clu. 5, 12; id. Sen. 11, 38; Liv. 29, 17, 7; v. 2. cum.—
    2.
    In colloquial lang., to denote emphatic assent, certainly, by all means, very well, yes; and with immo, to express emphatic dissent, certainly not, by no means: Ar. Jace, pater, talos, ut porro nos jaciamus. De. Maxime, Plaut. As. 5, 2, 54; id. Curc. 2, 3, 36: Th. Nisi quid magis Es occupatus, operam mihi da. Si. Maxime, id. Most. 4, 3, 17; Ter. And. 4, 5, 23: Ca. Numquid peccatum est, Simo? Si. Immo maxime, Plaut. Ps. 1, 5, 80; Ter. Hec. 2, 1, 31:

    scilicet res ipsa aspera est, sed vos non timetis eam. Immo vero maxime,

    Sall. C. 52, 28 (v. immo); v. Hand, Turs. III. p. 552-607.
    2.
    Magnus, i, m., a Roman surname, e. g. Cn. Pompeius Magnus; v. Pompeius.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > majores

  • 13 maxume

    1.
    magnus, a, um (archaic gen. magnai for magnae:

    magnai reipublicai gratia,

    Plaut. Mil. 2, 1, 23), adj.; comp. mājor, us; sup. maxĭmus ( maxŭm-), a, um [root magh-; Sanscr. mahat, maba, great; Gr. megas; cf. meizôn for megiôn; cf. mêchos, majestas; also cf. root mak-; Gr. makros, and perh. makar], great, large.
    I.
    Lit., of physical size or quantity, great, large; of things, vast, extensive, spacious, etc.: nequam et magnus homo, a great, tall fellow, Lucil. ap. Varr. L. L. 7, § 32 Mull.; cf.

    the double meaning: tu, bis denis grandia libris Qui scribis Priami proelia, magnus homo es,

    a great man, Mart. 9, 51, 4: magna ossa lacertique Apparent homini, Lucil. ap. Macr. S. 6, 1:

    magna ossa lacertosque Exuit,

    Verg. A. 5, 422: (scarus) magnusque bonusque, Enn. ap. App. Mag. p. 299 (Heduph. v. 9 Vahl.): indu mari magno, id. ap. Macr. 6, 2 (Ann. v. 425 Vahl.); so, in mari magno, id. ap. Fest. p. 356 Mull.; cf. Lucr. 2, 554:

    magnus fluens Nilus,

    Verg. G. 3, 28; Sen. Q. N. 4, 2, 2:

    magna et pulcra domus,

    spacious, Cic. N. D. 2, 6, 17:

    montes,

    Cat. 64. 280; cf. Olympum, Enn. ap. Varr. L. L. 7, § 20 Mull. (Ann. v. 1 Vahl.):

    templa caelitum,

    vast, id. ib. 7, § 6 (Trag. v. 227 Vahl.): magnae quercus, great oaks, lofty oaks, id. ap. Macr. S. 6, 2 (Ann. v. 194 Vahl.):

    aquae,

    great floods, inundations, Liv. 24, 9: saxa maxima, Enn. ap. Cic. Tusc. 1, 16, 37:

    oppidum maximum,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 23.—
    B.
    Esp.
    1.
    Of measure, weight, quantity, great, much, abundant, considerable, etc.:

    maximum pondus auri, magnum numerum frumenti, vim mellis maximam exportasse,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 2, 72, § 176:

    magna pecunia mutua,

    id. Att. 11, 3, 3:

    copia pabuli,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 16:

    multitudo peditatus,

    id. ib. 4, 34:

    divitiae,

    Nep. Dion. 1, 2:

    populus,

    Verg. A. 1, 148.—
    2.
    Rarely of time, for longus, multus:

    interea magnum sol circumvolvitur annum,

    Verg. A. 3, 284:

    magnum vocans solis (annum) comparatione lunaris,

    Macr. S. 2, 11:

    magno post tempore,

    Just. 11, 10, 14; 32, 3, 10.—
    3.
    Of the voice, loud, powerful, strong, mighty:

    magna voce confiteri,

    Cic. Caecin. 32, 92: major pars, the majority:

    tribunorum,

    Liv. 9, 46, 7.
    II.
    Trop.
    A.
    In gen., great, grand, mighty, noble, lofty, important, of great weight or importance, momentous: cum magnis dis, Enn. ap. Cic. Off. 1, 12, 38 (Ann. v. 207 Vahl.); cf.: Saturnia magna dearum, id. ap. Prisc. p. 1103 P. (Ann. v. 482 Vahl.):

    vir magnus in primis,

    Cic. N. D. 1, 43, 120:

    nemo igitur vir magnus sine aliquo adflatu divino umquam fuit,

    id. ib. 2, 66, 167:

    magnus hoc bello Themistocles fuit, nec minor in pace,

    Nep. Them. 6, 1:

    Cato clarus atque magnus habetur,

    Sall. C. 53, 1:

    amicus,

    great, wealthy, Juv. 6, 312: res magnas parvasque Eloqui, Enn. ap. Gell. 12, 4 (Ann. v. 244 Vahl.):

    virtus,

    Caes. B. G. 2, 15:

    infamia,

    Cic. Fam. 1, 1:

    eloquentia, gravitas, studium, contentio,

    id. ib.:

    multo major alacritas, studiumque pugnandi majus,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 46:

    causa,

    great, important, weighty, Cic. Dom. 1, 1:

    opus et arduum,

    id. Or. 10, 33.— Absol. in neutr, sing. and plur.:

    quamquam id magnum, et arduum est,

    something great, Cic. Fam. 6, 7, 6: magna Di curant ( great things, important matters), parva neglegunt, id. N. D. 2, 66, 167:

    magna loqui,

    to say great things, speak boastfully, Tib. 2, 6, 11:

    magnum est efficere, ut quis intellegat, quid sit illud, etc.,

    it is a great, difficult, important thing, Cic. Ac. 1, 2, 7:

    probitatem vel in eis, quos numquam vidimus, vel, quod majus est, in hoste etiam diligimus,

    what is far greater, id. Lael. 9, 29: annus magnus, the great year, at the end of which the sun, moon, and planets were supposed to return to the same relative positions, the Piatonic year or cycle, consisting of 15000 years:

    quarum (stellarum) ex disparibus motionibus, magnum annum mathematici nominaverunt, etc.,

    Cic. N. D. 2, 20, 52; id. Fragm. ap. Tac. Or. 16.— Posit. in comparison: Alexander orbi magnus est, Alex. andro orbis angustus, great in comparison with, i. e. too great for, Sen. Suas. 1, 3.—
    B.
    In partic.
    1.
    Of age, with natu, advanced in years, of great age, aged:

    jam magno natu,

    Nep. Paus. 5; Liv. 3, 71, 3:

    homo magnus natu,

    id. 10, 38, 6.—Usually in the comp. and sup., with or without natu or annis, older, the elder, the oldest or eldest:

    qui (Livius) fuit major natu quam Plautus et Naevius,

    older than, earlier, Cic. Tusc. 1, 1, 3:

    audivi ex majoribus natu,

    id. Off. 1, 30, 109:

    hic una e multis, quae maxima natu, Pyrgo,

    Verg. A. 5, 644:

    annos natus major quadraginta,

    more than, Cic. Rosc. Am. 14, 39:

    civis major annis viginti,

    Suet. Caes. 42:

    cum liberis, majoribus quam quindecim annos natis,

    Liv. 45, 32.— Absol.: senis nostri frater major, the elder of two, Ter. Phorm. 1, 2, 13:

    ex duobus filiis major, Caes B. C. 3, 108, 3: Fabii Ambusti filiae duae nuptae, Ser. Sulpicio major minor Licinio Stoloni erat,

    Liv. 6, 34:

    Gelo maximus stirpis,

    id. 23, 30:

    ut nubere vellet mulier viro, major juniori,

    App. Mag. 27, p. 291, 28; cf.

    in gen.: Cyrus major,

    Lact. 4, 5, 7:

    quaerere uter major aetate fuerit, Homerus an Hesiodus, cum minor Hecuba fuerit quam Helena,

    Sen. Ep. 88, 5.—In legal lang., major (opp. minor), one who has attained his twenty-fifth year, who is of age:

    si minor negotiis majoris intervenerit,

    Dig. 4, 4, 24.—In plur. subst.: mājō-res, um, m., adults (opp. pueri), Varr. L. L. 9, 10, § 16 Mull.—But usually majores, ancestors, forefathers:

    Itan tandem hanc majores famam tradiderunt tibi tui, Ut, etc.,

    Plaut. Trin. 3, 2, 16:

    ibi mei sunt majores siti, pater, avos, proavos, abavos,

    id. Mil. 2, 4, 20:

    L. Philippus, vir patre, avo, majoribus suis dignissimus,

    Cic. Phil. 3, 10, 25:

    patres majoresque nostri,

    id. Div. in Caecil. 21, 69:

    more majorum,

    id. Att. 1, 1, 1:

    spes tamen una est, aliquando populum Romanum majorum similem fore,

    id. Fam. 12, 22, 2:

    majores natu,

    Nep. Iphicr. 1, 1:

    maxima virgo,

    the eldest of the Vestal virgins, Ov. F. 4, 639: major erus, the old master, the master of the house, the old man (opp.: minor erus, the young master): Le. Ubinam est erus? Li. Major apud forum'st, minor hic est intus, Plaut. As. 2, 2, 63: majores natu, of the Senate:

    de istis rebus in patria majores natu consulemus,

    Liv. 1, 32, 10.—In designating relationship, magnus denotes kindred of the fourth, major of the fifth, and maximus of the sixth degree; so, avunculus magnus, a great-uncle; amita magna, a greataunt; avunculus or amita major; avunculus maximus, amita maxima, etc.; v. h. vv., and cf. Dig. 38, 10, 10.—
    2.
    In specifications of value, in the neutr. absol., magni or magno, high, dear, of great value, at a high price, etc.; cf.: pretii majoris or maximi, higher, highest, very high:

    magni esse,

    to be highly esteemed, Cic. Fam. 13, 72, 2:

    magni aestimare,

    id. Tusc. 5, 7, 20:

    magni existimans interesse ad decus,

    to be of great consequence, id. N. D. 1, 4, 7:

    emere agros poterunt quam volent magno,

    id. Agr. 2, 13, 34:

    magno vendere,

    id. Verr. 2, 3, 30, § 71:

    conducere aliquid nimium magno,

    too high, too dear, id. Att. 1, 17, 9:

    magno illi ea cunctatio stetit,

    cost him dear, Liv. 2, 36.— Comp.:

    ornatus muliebris majoris pretii,

    Cic. Inv 1, 31, 51, rarely without pretii:

    multo majoris alapae mecum veneunt,

    dearer, higher, Phaedr. 2, 5, 25.— Sup.: te haec solum semper fecit maxumi, most highly prized, Ter And. 1, 5, 58:

    senatus auctoritatem sibi maximi videri,

    Cic. Att. 1, 14, 2: in majus, too greatly, too highly, greater than it is:

    extollere aliquid in majus,

    more highly than it deserves, Tac. A. 15, 30:

    celebrare,

    id. ib. 13, 8:

    nuntiare,

    id. H. 3, 38:

    credere,

    to believe a thing to be worse than it is, id. ib. 1, 18:

    accipere,

    to take a thing to be greater than it is, id. ib. 3, 8 init.: innotescere, in an exaggerated manner, id. ib 4, 50.—Also with abl., in majus vero ferri, Liv. 21, 32, 7.—
    3.
    Magnum and maximum, adverbially, greatly, loudly (ante- and post-class.):

    magnum clamat,

    greatly, with a loud voice, aloud, Plaut. Mil. 3, 2, 10:

    inclamare,

    Gell. 5, 9 fin.:

    exclamat derepente maximum,

    Plaut. Most. 2, 2, 57.—Hence, măgis, adv., only in comp. in this anomalous form (i. e. mag-ius, like pris-cus for [p. 1100] prius-cus, and pris-tinus for prius-tinus); and in sup.: maxĭmē ( maxŭmē).
    A.
    Comp.: magĭs (apocop. form, măgĕ, Plaut. As. 1, 1, 51; 2, 3, 14; id. Mon. 2, 3, 35; id. Poen. 1, 2, 64; 1, 2, 14; id. Trin. 4, 3, 46; id. Truc. 1, 2, 75; 3, 1, 17; 4, 4, 34; Lucr. 4, 81; 756; 5, 1203; Prop. 1, 11, 9; 3 (4), 14, 2; 4 (5), 8, 16; Verg. A. 10, 481; Sol. 22 fin.; but in Enn. ap. Cic. Fam. 7, 13, 2, magis or magi'. Acc. to Serv. Verg. A. 10, 481, Cicero in the Frumentaria wrote: mage condemnatum hominum in judicium adducere non posse), in a higher degree, more completely, more (for the difference between magis, plus, potius, and amplius, v. amplius).—
    B.
    In gen.
    1.
    With no qualifying words.
    a.
    With the addition of the second term of the comparison.
    (α).
    With verbs:

    quae (facinora) istaec aetas fugere magis quam sectari solet,

    Plaut. Mil. 3, 1, 28:

    saliendo sese exercebant magis, quam scorto aut saviis,

    id. Bacch. 3, 3, 25; id. Pers. 4, 4, 108; 86:

    magis honorem tribuere quam salutem accipere,

    Caes. B. G. 7, 20, 7:

    nisi forte magis erit parricida, si qui consularem patrem, quam si quis humilem necarit,

    Cic. Mil. 7, 17:

    magis ut consuetudinem servem, quam quod, etc.,

    id. Clu. 32, 89.—Repeated:

    quam magis exhausto spumaverit ubere mulctra, Laeta magis pressis manabunt flumina mammis, i. e. quo magis,... eo magis,

    Verg. G. 3, 309 sq.; cf.:

    tam magis illa fremens... quam magis effuso crudescunt sanguine pugnae,

    id. ib. 7, 787 sq.; v. Hand, Turs. III. p. 566.—Magis est, quod or ut, there is greater reason, there is more cause that, etc.:

    quamobrem etsi magis est, quod gratuler tibi, quam quod te rogem: tamen etiam rogo, etc.,

    Cic. Att. 16, 5, 2:

    magis est, ut ipse moleste ferat, errasse se, quam ut, etc.,

    id. Cael. 6, 14.—
    (β).
    With substt., usu. with quam: tu me amoris magis quam honoris servavisti gratia, Poet. ap. Cic. Tusc. 4, 32, 69: bellipotentes sunt magi' quam sapientipotentes, Enn. ap. Cic. Div. 2, 56, 116 (Ann. v. 188 Vahl.):

    umbra es amantum magis quam amator,

    Plaut. Mil. 3, 1, 31:

    magis adeo id facilitate quam alia ulla culpa mea contigit,

    Cic. de Or. 2, 4, 15:

    aditus ad consulatum non magis nobilitati quam virtuti pateret,

    id. Mur. 8, 17:

    magis ratione et consilio quam virtute vicisse,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 40, 8; cf.:

    ut magis virtute quam dolo contenderent,

    id. ib. 1, 13, 6:

    se magis consuetudine sua quam merito eorum civitatem conservaturum,

    id. ib. 2, 32, 1:

    timori magis quam religioni consulere,

    id. B. C. 1, 67, 3:

    jus bonumque apud eos non legibus magis quam natura valebat,

    Sall. C. 9, 1:

    non duces magis quam milites callent (obsistere, etc.),

    Curt. 3, 2, 14.—And after negatives: non magis quam, as little as:

    in dicendo irasci, dolere... non sunt figurae, non magis quam suadere,

    Quint. 9, 1, 23:

    Romanos nec magis jam dolo capi quam armis vinci posse,

    Liv. 10, 4, 10:

    pro certo habens non magis Antonio eripi se quam Caesari Brutum posse,

    Sen. Suas. 6, 17:

    non magis Alexandri saevitiam quam Bessi parricidium ferre potuisse,

    Curt. 7, 6, 15; cf.:

    nec magis post proelium quam in proelio caedibus temperatum est,

    Liv. 2, 16, 9. —Followed by atque instead of quam (rare):

    non Apollinis magis verum atque hoc responsum est,

    Ter. And. 4, 2, 15.— With the comp. abl. (rare):

    quid philosophia magis colendum?

    Cic. Fin. 3, 22, 76:

    quanto magis Aliensi die Aliam ipsam reformidaturos?

    Liv. 6, 28, 6 Weissenb. ad loc.:

    quam Juno fertur terris magis omnibus unam... coluisse,

    Verg. A. 1, 15 (cf. B. 3. infra):

    Albanum sive Falernum Te magis appositis delectat,

    Hor. S. 2, 8, 17.—
    (γ).
    With pronn.:

    quid habetis, qui mage immortales vos credam esse quam ego siem?

    Plaut. Poen. 1, 2, 64:

    quis homo sit magis meus quam tu es?

    id. Mil. 3, 1, 20:

    quam mage amo quam matrem meam,

    id. Truc. 3, 1, 17; cf.:

    quem ego ecastor mage amo quam me,

    id. ib. 4, 4, 34.—With utrum, followed by an:

    jam scibo, utrum haec me mage amet, an marsupium,

    Plaut. Men. 2, 3, 35.—With the abl. instead of quam:

    nec magis hac infra quicquam est in corpore nostro,

    Lucr. 3, 274; Verg. A. 1, 15.—
    (δ).
    With adjj. and advv., and esp. with those which do not admit the comparative termination (most freq. without adding the second term of the comparison; v. under b. d): numquam potuisti mihi Magis opportunus advenire quam advenis, Plaut. Most. 3, 1, 47:

    neque lac lacti magis est simile, quam ille ego similis est mei,

    id. Am. 2, 1, 54:

    ars magis magna atque uber, quam difficilis et obscura,

    Cic. de Or. 1, 42, 190:

    corpora magna magis quam firma,

    Liv. 5, 44, 4:

    vultu pulchro magis quam venusto,

    Suet. Ner. 51.—With the abl., Plaut. As. 3, 3, 114:

    neque ego hoc homine quemquam vidi magis malum,

    id. Ps. 4, 1, 27:

    ab secundis rebus magis etiam solito incauti,

    Liv. 5, 44, 6.—With compp. (adding to their force):

    ita fustibus sum mollior miser magis quam ullus cinaedus,

    Plaut. Aul. 3, 2, 8. —
    b.
    Without the addition of the second term.
    (α).
    With verbs: ergo plusque magisque viri nunc gloria claret, Enn. ap. Macr. S. 6, 1 (Ann. v. 315 Vahl.):

    sapiunt magis,

    Plaut. Bacch. 3, 3, 4:

    magis curae est, magisque afformido, ne, etc.,

    id. ib. 4, 10, 3:

    magis metuant,

    id. Mil. 5, 44:

    tum magis id diceres, Fanni, si, etc.,

    Cic. Lael. 7 fin.; cf. id. Rep. 1, 40, 62:

    cum Pompeius ita contendisset, ut nihil umquam magis,

    id. Fam. 1, 9, 20:

    magis velle, for malle: quod magis vellem evenire,

    Ter. Eun. 5, 7, 1; Val. Fl. 3, 270.—
    (β).
    With substt.: non ex jure manum consertum sed magi' ferro, Enn. ap. Gell. 20, 10 (Ann. v. 276 Vahl.):

    magis aedilis fieri non potuisset,

    better, finer, Cic. Planc. 24, 60.—
    (γ).
    With pronn.:

    ecastor neminem hodie mage Amat corde atque animo suo,

    Plaut. Truc. 1, 2, 75.—
    (δ).
    With adjj. and advv. (so most freq.).—With adjj.:

    ut quadam magis necessaria ratione recte sit vivendum,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 3, 1, § 2:

    magis anxius,

    Ov. M. 1, 182:

    hic magis tranquillu'st,

    Plaut. Bacch. 5, 2, 55:

    nihil videtur mundius, nec magis compositum quicquam, nec magis elegans,

    Ter. Eun. 5, 4, 12:

    nemo fuit magis severus nec magis continens,

    id. ib. 2, 1, 21:

    quod est magis verisimile,

    Caes. B. G. 3, 13, 6:

    magis admirabilis oratio,

    Quint. 8, 3, 24:

    magis communia verba,

    id. 8, 2, 24 et saep.; rare: magis quam in aliis = praeter ceteros;

    nescio quo pacto magis quam in aliis suum cuique pulchrum est,

    Cic. Tusc. 5, 22, 63.— With advv.:

    magis aperte,

    Ter. Ad. 4, 5, 30:

    magis impense,

    id. ib. 5, 9, 36.—With compp. adding to their force:

    magis est dulcius,

    Plaut. Stich. 5, 4, 22:

    magis majores nugae,

    id. Men. prol. 55:

    magis modum in majorem,

    id. Am. 1, 1, 145:

    contentiores mage erunt,

    id. Poen. 2, 15.—
    2.
    Strengthened.
    a.
    By etiam, multo, tanto, eo, hoc, quo, tam, quam; and negatively, nihilo:

    qualis in dicendo Hierocles Alabandeus, magis etiam Menecles, frater ejus, fuit,

    Cic. Brut. 95, 325; id. Off. 1, 21, 72:

    illud ad me, ac multo etiam magis ad vos,

    id. de Or. 2, 32, 139:

    tanto magis Dic, quis est?

    Plaut. Bacch. 3, 6, 28:

    ut quidque magis contemplor, tanto magis placet,

    id. Most. 3, 2, 146:

    vicina cacumina caelo, quam sint magis, tanto magis fument,

    Lucr. 6, 460:

    quanto ille plura miscebat, tanto hic magis in dies convalescebat,

    Cic. Mil. 9, 25:

    sed eo magis cauto est Opus, ne huc exeat, qui, etc.,

    Plaut. Most. 4, 2, 22:

    atque eo magis, si, etc.,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 3, 1, § 1:

    eoque magis quod, etc.,

    id. Lael. 2, 7; Caes. B. G. 1, 23; 1, 47; 3, 14;

    5, 1: immo vero etiam hoc magis, quam illi veteres, quod, etc.,

    Cic. Agr. 2, 35, 97:

    hoc vero magis properare Varro, ut, etc.,

    Caes. B. C. 2, 20:

    quo magis cogito ego cum meo animo,

    Plaut. Most. 3, 2, 13; Nep. Thras. 2:

    magis quam id reputo, tam magis uror,

    Plaut. Bacch. 5, 1, 5:

    tam magis illa fremens... Quam magis, etc.,

    Verg. A. 7, 787:

    quanto mage... tam magis,

    Lucr. 4, 81 sq.:

    quam magis in pectore meo foveo, quas meus filius turbas turbet... magis curae est magisque afformido, ne, etc.,

    Plaut. Bacch. 4, 10, 1; 4, 4, 27; id. Men. 1, 1, 19:

    quam magis te in altum capessis, tam aestus te in portum refert,

    id. As. 1, 3, 6:

    densior hinc suboles Quam magis, etc.,

    Verg. G. 3, 309:

    cum Vercingetorix nihilo magis in aequum locum descenderet,

    Caes. B. G. 6, 53.—
    b.
    By reduplication: magis magisque, magis et magis, magis ac magis; and poet. also, magis magis, more and more: ex desiderio magis magisque maceror, Afran. ap. Charis. p. 182 P.:

    cum cotidie magis magisque perditi homines tectis ac templis urbis minarentur,

    Cic. Phil. 1, 2, 5; id. Fam. 2, 18, 2; 16, 21, 2; Sall. C. 5, 7; cf. Cic. Fil. Fam. 16, 21, 2:

    de Graecia cotidie magis et magis cogito,

    Cic. Att. 14, 18, 4; 16, 3, 1; id. Brut. 90, 308; Liv. 7, 32, 6; Sall. J. 8, 6:

    magis deinde ac magis,

    Suet. Vit. 10:

    post hoc magis ac magis,

    id. Gram. 3;

    for which also: magisque ac magis deinceps,

    id. Tit. 3; Tac. A. 14, 8; Sen. de Ira, 3, 1, 4; id. Ep. 114, 25; id. Ben. 2, 14, 4; Plin. Ep. 1, 12, 10; 7, 3, 4; 10, 28, 3.— Poet. also:

    magis atque magis,

    Verg. A. 12, 239; Cat. 68, 48:

    post, vento crescente, magis magis increbescunt,

    id. 64, 275; cf. Verg. G. 4, 311.—
    3.
    Pleon.
    a.
    With potius (anteclass.):

    magis decorum'st Libertum potius quam patronum onus in via portare,

    Plaut. As. 3, 3, 99:

    mihi magis lubet cum probis potius quam cum improbis vivere,

    id. Trin. 2, 1, 38.—
    b.
    With malle: quam cum lego, nihil malo quam has res relinquere;

    his vero auditis multo magis,

    Cic. Tusc. 1, 31, 76:

    finge enim malle eum magis suum consequi quam, etc.,

    Dig. 17, 2, 52, § 10. —
    C.
    In partic.: non (neque) magis quam.
    1.
    To signify perfect equality between two enunciations, no more... than; just as much... as; or neg., no more... than; just as little... as:

    domus erat non domino magis ornamento quam civitati,

    i. e. just as much to the city as to its owner, Cic. Verr. 2, 4, 3, § 5; Planc. ap. Cic. Fam. 10, 4, 2:

    non Hannibale magis victo a se quam Q. Fabio,

    Liv. 22, 27, 2:

    conficior enim maerore, mea Terentia, nec me meae miseriae magis excruciant quam tuae vestraeque,

    Cic. Fam. 13, 3, 1; Liv. 9, 22.— Neg.: qui est enim animus in aliquo morbo... non magis est sanus, quam id corpus, quod in morbo est, i. e. is just as far from being sound as a body, etc., Cic. Tusc. 3, 5, 10:

    si aliqua in re Verris similis fuero, non magis mihi deerit inimicus quam Verri defuit,

    id. Verr. 2, 3, 69, § 162; id. Fam. 5, 12, 3; id. de Or. 2, 8, 31:

    non nascitur itaque ex malo bonum, non magis quam ficus ex olea,

    Sen. Ep. 87, 25;

    Quint. prooem. § 26: non magis Gaium imperaturum, quam per Baianum sinum equis discursurum,

    Suet. Calig. 19. —Ellipt.:

    nec eo magis lege liberi sunto,

    just as little from that as from the rest, Cic. Leg. 3, 4, 11.—
    2.
    For restricting the idea expressed in the clause with non magis, so that not more, according to a common figure of speech, = less; in Engl. not so much... as; less... than:

    deinde credas mihi affirmanti velim, me hoc non pro Lysone magis quam pro omnibus scribere,

    Cic. Fam. 13, 24; Planc. ap. Cic. Fam. 10, 17:

    miserebat non poenae magis homines, quam sceleris, quo poenam meriti essent,

    Liv. 2, 5; 1, 28.—
    3.
    Magis minusve, magis aut minus, or magis ac minus; post-Aug. for the usual plus minusve, more or less:

    sed istud magis minusve vitiosum est pro personis dicentium,

    Quint. 11, 1, 27; Plin. 17, 24, 37, § 220:

    minora vero plerumque sunt talia, ut pro persona, tempore, loco, causa magis ac minus vel excusata debeant videri vel reprehendenda,

    Quint. 11, 1, 14; Plin. 37, 5, 18, § 67:

    quaedam tamen et nationibus puto magis aut minus convenire,

    Sen. Ep. 40, 11; cf.:

    quosdam minus aut magis osos veritatem,

    id. Suas. 1, 5:

    aut minus, aut magis,

    id. Ep. 82, 14.—
    4.
    With alius... alio, etc.: ceterae philosophorum disciplinae, omnino alia magis alia, sed tamen omnes, one more than another, i. e. in different degrees, Cic. Fin. 3, 3, 11 Madvig. ad loc. (al.:

    alia magis, alia minus, v. Hand, Turs. III. p. 560): mihi videntur omnes quidem illi errasse... sed alius alio magis,

    Cic. Fin. 4, 16, 43:

    sunt omnino omnes fere similes, sed declarant communis notiones, alia magis alia,

    id. Tusc. 4, 24, 53:

    alii aliis magis recusare,

    Liv. 29, 15, 11.— Sup.: maxĭmē( maxŭmē), in the highest degree, most of all, most particularly, especially, exceedingly, very, etc.
    A.
    Lit.
    1.
    Alone.
    a.
    With a verb:

    haec una res in omni libero populo maximeque in pacatis tranquillisque civitatibus praecipue semper floruit,

    Cic. de Or. 1, 8, 30:

    quid commemorem primum aut laudem maxime?

    Ter. Eun. 5, 9, 14; 3, 1, 79:

    nos coluit maxime,

    id. Ad. 3, 2, 54:

    quem convenire maxime cupiebam,

    Plaut. Pers. 2, 4, 30; id. As. 3, 3, 133:

    de te audiebamus ea, quae maxime vellemus,

    Cic. Fam. 12, 25, a, 7; cf. id. Att. 13, 1:

    extra quos (fines) egredi non possim, si maxime velim,

    id. Quint. 10, 35:

    in re publica maxime conservanda sunt jura belli,

    most especially, id. Off. 1, 11, 33: huic legioni Caesar propter virtutem confidebat maxime, [p. 1101] Caes. B. G. 1, 40:

    quem Homero crederet maxime accedere,

    came nearest to, Quint. 10, 1, 86; cf.

    pugnare,

    most violently, Plaut. Am. 1, 1, 271; 1, 1, 44:

    jubere,

    most positively, id. Bacch. 4, 9, 80:

    id enim est profecto, quod constituta religione rem publicam contineat maxime,

    Cic. Leg. 2, 27, 69; cf. maxime fin.:

    ab eo exordiri volui maxime,

    id. Off. 1, 2, 4:

    cernere naturae vim maxime,

    id. Tusc. 1, 15, 35.—
    b.
    With an adj.:

    res maxime necessaria,

    Cic. Lael. 23, 86:

    loca maxime frumentaria,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 10:

    loci ad hoc maxime idonei,

    Quint. 1, 11, 13:

    maxime naturali carent amicitia,

    Cic. Lael. 21, 80:

    maxime feri,

    Caes. B. G. 2, 4:

    qui eo tempore maxime plebi acceptus erat,

    id. ib. 1, 3:

    idem ad augendam eloquentiam maxime accommodati erunt,

    Quint. 1, 11, 13:

    elegans maxime auctor,

    id. 10, 1, 93:

    maxime vero commune est quaerere, an sit honesta? etc.,

    id. 2, 4, 37:

    noto enim maxime utar exemplo,

    id. 7, 3, 3.—So with supp.:

    quae maxime liberalissima,

    Cic. Att. 12, 38, 3:

    maxime gravissimam omniumque (rerum),

    Liv. 41, 23, 4 MS. (dub.: maxumam gravissimamque, Weissenb.). —
    c.
    With numerals, at most:

    puer ad annos maxime natus octo,

    Gell. 17, 8, 4.—
    d.
    With an adv.:

    ut dicatis quam maxime ad veritatem accommodate,

    Cic. de Or. 1, 33, 149 (v. infra 2).—
    2.
    Strengthened by unus, unus omnium, omnium, multo, vel, tam, quam, etc. (supply potest):

    qui proelium unus maxime accenderat,

    Curt. 5, 2, 5:

    cum sua modestia unus omnium maxime floreret,

    Nep. Milt. 1, 1:

    quae maxime omnium belli avida,

    Liv. 23, 49; 4, 59; cf. Drak. ad Liv. 36, 19, 4:

    atque ea res multo maxime disjunxit illum ab illa,

    Ter. Hec. 1, 2, 85:

    imperium populi Romani multo maxime miserabile visum est,

    Sall. C. 36, 4:

    illud mihi videtur vel maxime confirmare, etc.,

    Cic. N. D. 2, 65, 162:

    hoc enim uno praestamus vel maxime feris,

    id. de Or. 1, 8, 32:

    quae quidem vel maxime suspicionem movent,

    id. Part. Or. 33, 114:

    quam potes, tam verba confer maxime ad compendium,

    as much as possible, Plaut. Mil. 3, 1, 186:

    ego jubeo quam maxime unam facere nos hanc familiam,

    Ter. Ad. 5, 8, 2:

    ut quam maxime permaneant diuturna corpora,

    Cic. Tusc. 1, 45, 108; id. de Or. 1, 34, 154:

    quo mihi rectius videtur, memoriam nostri quam maxime longam efficere,

    Sall. C. 1, 3:

    ceterum illum juvenem incipere a quam maxime facili ac favorabili causa velim,

    Quint. 12, 6, 6.—
    3.
    With the relative qui in the phrases, quam qui maxime and ut qui maxime:

    tam enim sum amicus rei publicae, quam qui maxime,

    as any one whatever, Cic. Fam. 5, 2, 6:

    grata ea res, ut quae maxime senatui umquam fuit,

    Liv. 5, 25; 7, 33.—
    4.
    With ut quisque... ita (maxime, potissimum or minime), the more... the more (or less):

    hoc maxime officii est, ut quisque maxime opis indigeat, ita ei potissimum opitulari,

    Cic. Off. 1, 15, 49:

    ut quisque magnitudine animae maxime excellit, ita maxime, etc.,

    id. ib. 1, 19, 64; cf.

    , in the contrary order: colendum autem esse ita quemque maxime, ut quisque maxime virtutibus his lenioribus erit ornatus,

    id. ib. 1, 15, 47:

    ut enim quisque maxime ad suum commodum refert, quaecumque agit, ita minime est vir bonus,

    id. Leg. 1, 18, 49.—
    5.
    In gradations, to denote the first and most desirable, first of all, in the first place:

    hujus industriam maxime quidem vellem, ut imitarentur ii, quos oportebat: secundo autem loco, ne alterius labori inviderent,

    Cic. Phil. 8, 10, 31; cf. id. Caecin. 9, 23:

    si per eum reductus insidiose redissem, me scilicet maxime sed proxime illum quoque fefellissem,

    id. Rab. Post. 12, 33:

    in quo genere sunt maxime oves, deinde caprae,

    Varr. R. R. 2, 9, 1:

    maxime... dein,

    Plin. 9, 16, 23, § 56:

    sed vitem maxime populus videtur alere, deinde ulmus, post etiam fraxinus,

    Col. 5, 6, 4:

    maxime... deinde... postea... minume,

    Plin. 37, 12, 75, § 196:

    maxime... postea... ultimae,

    Col. 6, 3, 6:

    post Chium maxime laudatur Creticum, mox Aegyptium,

    Plin. 18, 7, 17, § 77.—
    B.
    Transf.
    1.
    Like potissimum, to give prominence to an idea, especially, particularly, principally:

    quae ratio poetas, maximeque Homerum impulit, ut, etc.,

    Cic. N. D. 2, 6, 6; Varr. R. R. 1, 51, 1:

    scribe aliquid, et maxime, si Pompeius Italia cedit,

    Cic. Att. 7, 12, 4: de Cocceio et Libone quae scribis, approbo:

    maxime quod de judicatu meo,

    id. ib. 12, 19, 2; id. Fin. 5, 1, 1:

    cognoscat etiam rerum gestarum et memoriae veteris ordinem, maxime scilicet nostrae civitatis,

    id. Or. 34, 120; id. Att. 13, 1, 2.—So in the connection, cum... tum maxime; tum... tum maxime; ut... tum maxime, but more especially:

    scio et perspexi saepe: cum antehac, tum hodie maxime,

    Plaut. Mil. 4, 8, 56:

    plena exemplorum est nostra res publica, cum saepe, tum maxime bello Punico secundo,

    Cic. Off. 3, 11, 47; id. Att. 11, 6, 1; id. Fl. 38, 94:

    tum exercitationibus crebris atque magnis, tum scribendo maxime persequatur,

    id. de Or. 2, 23, 96:

    longius autem procedens, ut in ceteris eloquentiae partibus, tum maxime, etc.,

    id. Brut. 93, 320.— With nunc, nuper, tum, cum, just, precisely, exactly: Me. Quid? vostrum patri Filii quot eratis? M. Su. Ut nunc maxime memini, duo, just now, Plaut. Men. 5, 9, 58:

    cum iis, quos nuper maxime liberaverat,

    Caes. B. C. 3, 9:

    ipse tum maxime admoto igne refovebat artus,

    Curt. 8, 4, 25; 6, 6, 10; 5, 7, 2; Liv. 27, 4, 2 Drak.:

    haec cum maxime loqueretur, sex lictores eum circumsistunt valentissimi,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 5, 54, § 142; cf. id. ib. 2, 2, 76, § 187;

    2, 4, 38, § 72: totius autem injustitiae nulla capitalior, quam eorum, qui cum maxime fallunt, id agunt, ut viri boni esse videantur,

    id. Off. 1, 13, 41; Liv. 4, 3; 30, 33:

    tum cum maxime,

    at that precise time, at that moment, Liv. 40, 13, 4; 40, 32, 1; 33, 9, 3; 43, 7, 8; so,

    tunc cum maxime,

    Curt. 3, 2, 17:

    nunc cum maxime,

    Cic. Clu. 5, 12; id. Sen. 11, 38; Liv. 29, 17, 7; v. 2. cum.—
    2.
    In colloquial lang., to denote emphatic assent, certainly, by all means, very well, yes; and with immo, to express emphatic dissent, certainly not, by no means: Ar. Jace, pater, talos, ut porro nos jaciamus. De. Maxime, Plaut. As. 5, 2, 54; id. Curc. 2, 3, 36: Th. Nisi quid magis Es occupatus, operam mihi da. Si. Maxime, id. Most. 4, 3, 17; Ter. And. 4, 5, 23: Ca. Numquid peccatum est, Simo? Si. Immo maxime, Plaut. Ps. 1, 5, 80; Ter. Hec. 2, 1, 31:

    scilicet res ipsa aspera est, sed vos non timetis eam. Immo vero maxime,

    Sall. C. 52, 28 (v. immo); v. Hand, Turs. III. p. 552-607.
    2.
    Magnus, i, m., a Roman surname, e. g. Cn. Pompeius Magnus; v. Pompeius.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > maxume

  • 14 maxumus

    1.
    magnus, a, um (archaic gen. magnai for magnae:

    magnai reipublicai gratia,

    Plaut. Mil. 2, 1, 23), adj.; comp. mājor, us; sup. maxĭmus ( maxŭm-), a, um [root magh-; Sanscr. mahat, maba, great; Gr. megas; cf. meizôn for megiôn; cf. mêchos, majestas; also cf. root mak-; Gr. makros, and perh. makar], great, large.
    I.
    Lit., of physical size or quantity, great, large; of things, vast, extensive, spacious, etc.: nequam et magnus homo, a great, tall fellow, Lucil. ap. Varr. L. L. 7, § 32 Mull.; cf.

    the double meaning: tu, bis denis grandia libris Qui scribis Priami proelia, magnus homo es,

    a great man, Mart. 9, 51, 4: magna ossa lacertique Apparent homini, Lucil. ap. Macr. S. 6, 1:

    magna ossa lacertosque Exuit,

    Verg. A. 5, 422: (scarus) magnusque bonusque, Enn. ap. App. Mag. p. 299 (Heduph. v. 9 Vahl.): indu mari magno, id. ap. Macr. 6, 2 (Ann. v. 425 Vahl.); so, in mari magno, id. ap. Fest. p. 356 Mull.; cf. Lucr. 2, 554:

    magnus fluens Nilus,

    Verg. G. 3, 28; Sen. Q. N. 4, 2, 2:

    magna et pulcra domus,

    spacious, Cic. N. D. 2, 6, 17:

    montes,

    Cat. 64. 280; cf. Olympum, Enn. ap. Varr. L. L. 7, § 20 Mull. (Ann. v. 1 Vahl.):

    templa caelitum,

    vast, id. ib. 7, § 6 (Trag. v. 227 Vahl.): magnae quercus, great oaks, lofty oaks, id. ap. Macr. S. 6, 2 (Ann. v. 194 Vahl.):

    aquae,

    great floods, inundations, Liv. 24, 9: saxa maxima, Enn. ap. Cic. Tusc. 1, 16, 37:

    oppidum maximum,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 23.—
    B.
    Esp.
    1.
    Of measure, weight, quantity, great, much, abundant, considerable, etc.:

    maximum pondus auri, magnum numerum frumenti, vim mellis maximam exportasse,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 2, 72, § 176:

    magna pecunia mutua,

    id. Att. 11, 3, 3:

    copia pabuli,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 16:

    multitudo peditatus,

    id. ib. 4, 34:

    divitiae,

    Nep. Dion. 1, 2:

    populus,

    Verg. A. 1, 148.—
    2.
    Rarely of time, for longus, multus:

    interea magnum sol circumvolvitur annum,

    Verg. A. 3, 284:

    magnum vocans solis (annum) comparatione lunaris,

    Macr. S. 2, 11:

    magno post tempore,

    Just. 11, 10, 14; 32, 3, 10.—
    3.
    Of the voice, loud, powerful, strong, mighty:

    magna voce confiteri,

    Cic. Caecin. 32, 92: major pars, the majority:

    tribunorum,

    Liv. 9, 46, 7.
    II.
    Trop.
    A.
    In gen., great, grand, mighty, noble, lofty, important, of great weight or importance, momentous: cum magnis dis, Enn. ap. Cic. Off. 1, 12, 38 (Ann. v. 207 Vahl.); cf.: Saturnia magna dearum, id. ap. Prisc. p. 1103 P. (Ann. v. 482 Vahl.):

    vir magnus in primis,

    Cic. N. D. 1, 43, 120:

    nemo igitur vir magnus sine aliquo adflatu divino umquam fuit,

    id. ib. 2, 66, 167:

    magnus hoc bello Themistocles fuit, nec minor in pace,

    Nep. Them. 6, 1:

    Cato clarus atque magnus habetur,

    Sall. C. 53, 1:

    amicus,

    great, wealthy, Juv. 6, 312: res magnas parvasque Eloqui, Enn. ap. Gell. 12, 4 (Ann. v. 244 Vahl.):

    virtus,

    Caes. B. G. 2, 15:

    infamia,

    Cic. Fam. 1, 1:

    eloquentia, gravitas, studium, contentio,

    id. ib.:

    multo major alacritas, studiumque pugnandi majus,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 46:

    causa,

    great, important, weighty, Cic. Dom. 1, 1:

    opus et arduum,

    id. Or. 10, 33.— Absol. in neutr, sing. and plur.:

    quamquam id magnum, et arduum est,

    something great, Cic. Fam. 6, 7, 6: magna Di curant ( great things, important matters), parva neglegunt, id. N. D. 2, 66, 167:

    magna loqui,

    to say great things, speak boastfully, Tib. 2, 6, 11:

    magnum est efficere, ut quis intellegat, quid sit illud, etc.,

    it is a great, difficult, important thing, Cic. Ac. 1, 2, 7:

    probitatem vel in eis, quos numquam vidimus, vel, quod majus est, in hoste etiam diligimus,

    what is far greater, id. Lael. 9, 29: annus magnus, the great year, at the end of which the sun, moon, and planets were supposed to return to the same relative positions, the Piatonic year or cycle, consisting of 15000 years:

    quarum (stellarum) ex disparibus motionibus, magnum annum mathematici nominaverunt, etc.,

    Cic. N. D. 2, 20, 52; id. Fragm. ap. Tac. Or. 16.— Posit. in comparison: Alexander orbi magnus est, Alex. andro orbis angustus, great in comparison with, i. e. too great for, Sen. Suas. 1, 3.—
    B.
    In partic.
    1.
    Of age, with natu, advanced in years, of great age, aged:

    jam magno natu,

    Nep. Paus. 5; Liv. 3, 71, 3:

    homo magnus natu,

    id. 10, 38, 6.—Usually in the comp. and sup., with or without natu or annis, older, the elder, the oldest or eldest:

    qui (Livius) fuit major natu quam Plautus et Naevius,

    older than, earlier, Cic. Tusc. 1, 1, 3:

    audivi ex majoribus natu,

    id. Off. 1, 30, 109:

    hic una e multis, quae maxima natu, Pyrgo,

    Verg. A. 5, 644:

    annos natus major quadraginta,

    more than, Cic. Rosc. Am. 14, 39:

    civis major annis viginti,

    Suet. Caes. 42:

    cum liberis, majoribus quam quindecim annos natis,

    Liv. 45, 32.— Absol.: senis nostri frater major, the elder of two, Ter. Phorm. 1, 2, 13:

    ex duobus filiis major, Caes B. C. 3, 108, 3: Fabii Ambusti filiae duae nuptae, Ser. Sulpicio major minor Licinio Stoloni erat,

    Liv. 6, 34:

    Gelo maximus stirpis,

    id. 23, 30:

    ut nubere vellet mulier viro, major juniori,

    App. Mag. 27, p. 291, 28; cf.

    in gen.: Cyrus major,

    Lact. 4, 5, 7:

    quaerere uter major aetate fuerit, Homerus an Hesiodus, cum minor Hecuba fuerit quam Helena,

    Sen. Ep. 88, 5.—In legal lang., major (opp. minor), one who has attained his twenty-fifth year, who is of age:

    si minor negotiis majoris intervenerit,

    Dig. 4, 4, 24.—In plur. subst.: mājō-res, um, m., adults (opp. pueri), Varr. L. L. 9, 10, § 16 Mull.—But usually majores, ancestors, forefathers:

    Itan tandem hanc majores famam tradiderunt tibi tui, Ut, etc.,

    Plaut. Trin. 3, 2, 16:

    ibi mei sunt majores siti, pater, avos, proavos, abavos,

    id. Mil. 2, 4, 20:

    L. Philippus, vir patre, avo, majoribus suis dignissimus,

    Cic. Phil. 3, 10, 25:

    patres majoresque nostri,

    id. Div. in Caecil. 21, 69:

    more majorum,

    id. Att. 1, 1, 1:

    spes tamen una est, aliquando populum Romanum majorum similem fore,

    id. Fam. 12, 22, 2:

    majores natu,

    Nep. Iphicr. 1, 1:

    maxima virgo,

    the eldest of the Vestal virgins, Ov. F. 4, 639: major erus, the old master, the master of the house, the old man (opp.: minor erus, the young master): Le. Ubinam est erus? Li. Major apud forum'st, minor hic est intus, Plaut. As. 2, 2, 63: majores natu, of the Senate:

    de istis rebus in patria majores natu consulemus,

    Liv. 1, 32, 10.—In designating relationship, magnus denotes kindred of the fourth, major of the fifth, and maximus of the sixth degree; so, avunculus magnus, a great-uncle; amita magna, a greataunt; avunculus or amita major; avunculus maximus, amita maxima, etc.; v. h. vv., and cf. Dig. 38, 10, 10.—
    2.
    In specifications of value, in the neutr. absol., magni or magno, high, dear, of great value, at a high price, etc.; cf.: pretii majoris or maximi, higher, highest, very high:

    magni esse,

    to be highly esteemed, Cic. Fam. 13, 72, 2:

    magni aestimare,

    id. Tusc. 5, 7, 20:

    magni existimans interesse ad decus,

    to be of great consequence, id. N. D. 1, 4, 7:

    emere agros poterunt quam volent magno,

    id. Agr. 2, 13, 34:

    magno vendere,

    id. Verr. 2, 3, 30, § 71:

    conducere aliquid nimium magno,

    too high, too dear, id. Att. 1, 17, 9:

    magno illi ea cunctatio stetit,

    cost him dear, Liv. 2, 36.— Comp.:

    ornatus muliebris majoris pretii,

    Cic. Inv 1, 31, 51, rarely without pretii:

    multo majoris alapae mecum veneunt,

    dearer, higher, Phaedr. 2, 5, 25.— Sup.: te haec solum semper fecit maxumi, most highly prized, Ter And. 1, 5, 58:

    senatus auctoritatem sibi maximi videri,

    Cic. Att. 1, 14, 2: in majus, too greatly, too highly, greater than it is:

    extollere aliquid in majus,

    more highly than it deserves, Tac. A. 15, 30:

    celebrare,

    id. ib. 13, 8:

    nuntiare,

    id. H. 3, 38:

    credere,

    to believe a thing to be worse than it is, id. ib. 1, 18:

    accipere,

    to take a thing to be greater than it is, id. ib. 3, 8 init.: innotescere, in an exaggerated manner, id. ib 4, 50.—Also with abl., in majus vero ferri, Liv. 21, 32, 7.—
    3.
    Magnum and maximum, adverbially, greatly, loudly (ante- and post-class.):

    magnum clamat,

    greatly, with a loud voice, aloud, Plaut. Mil. 3, 2, 10:

    inclamare,

    Gell. 5, 9 fin.:

    exclamat derepente maximum,

    Plaut. Most. 2, 2, 57.—Hence, măgis, adv., only in comp. in this anomalous form (i. e. mag-ius, like pris-cus for [p. 1100] prius-cus, and pris-tinus for prius-tinus); and in sup.: maxĭmē ( maxŭmē).
    A.
    Comp.: magĭs (apocop. form, măgĕ, Plaut. As. 1, 1, 51; 2, 3, 14; id. Mon. 2, 3, 35; id. Poen. 1, 2, 64; 1, 2, 14; id. Trin. 4, 3, 46; id. Truc. 1, 2, 75; 3, 1, 17; 4, 4, 34; Lucr. 4, 81; 756; 5, 1203; Prop. 1, 11, 9; 3 (4), 14, 2; 4 (5), 8, 16; Verg. A. 10, 481; Sol. 22 fin.; but in Enn. ap. Cic. Fam. 7, 13, 2, magis or magi'. Acc. to Serv. Verg. A. 10, 481, Cicero in the Frumentaria wrote: mage condemnatum hominum in judicium adducere non posse), in a higher degree, more completely, more (for the difference between magis, plus, potius, and amplius, v. amplius).—
    B.
    In gen.
    1.
    With no qualifying words.
    a.
    With the addition of the second term of the comparison.
    (α).
    With verbs:

    quae (facinora) istaec aetas fugere magis quam sectari solet,

    Plaut. Mil. 3, 1, 28:

    saliendo sese exercebant magis, quam scorto aut saviis,

    id. Bacch. 3, 3, 25; id. Pers. 4, 4, 108; 86:

    magis honorem tribuere quam salutem accipere,

    Caes. B. G. 7, 20, 7:

    nisi forte magis erit parricida, si qui consularem patrem, quam si quis humilem necarit,

    Cic. Mil. 7, 17:

    magis ut consuetudinem servem, quam quod, etc.,

    id. Clu. 32, 89.—Repeated:

    quam magis exhausto spumaverit ubere mulctra, Laeta magis pressis manabunt flumina mammis, i. e. quo magis,... eo magis,

    Verg. G. 3, 309 sq.; cf.:

    tam magis illa fremens... quam magis effuso crudescunt sanguine pugnae,

    id. ib. 7, 787 sq.; v. Hand, Turs. III. p. 566.—Magis est, quod or ut, there is greater reason, there is more cause that, etc.:

    quamobrem etsi magis est, quod gratuler tibi, quam quod te rogem: tamen etiam rogo, etc.,

    Cic. Att. 16, 5, 2:

    magis est, ut ipse moleste ferat, errasse se, quam ut, etc.,

    id. Cael. 6, 14.—
    (β).
    With substt., usu. with quam: tu me amoris magis quam honoris servavisti gratia, Poet. ap. Cic. Tusc. 4, 32, 69: bellipotentes sunt magi' quam sapientipotentes, Enn. ap. Cic. Div. 2, 56, 116 (Ann. v. 188 Vahl.):

    umbra es amantum magis quam amator,

    Plaut. Mil. 3, 1, 31:

    magis adeo id facilitate quam alia ulla culpa mea contigit,

    Cic. de Or. 2, 4, 15:

    aditus ad consulatum non magis nobilitati quam virtuti pateret,

    id. Mur. 8, 17:

    magis ratione et consilio quam virtute vicisse,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 40, 8; cf.:

    ut magis virtute quam dolo contenderent,

    id. ib. 1, 13, 6:

    se magis consuetudine sua quam merito eorum civitatem conservaturum,

    id. ib. 2, 32, 1:

    timori magis quam religioni consulere,

    id. B. C. 1, 67, 3:

    jus bonumque apud eos non legibus magis quam natura valebat,

    Sall. C. 9, 1:

    non duces magis quam milites callent (obsistere, etc.),

    Curt. 3, 2, 14.—And after negatives: non magis quam, as little as:

    in dicendo irasci, dolere... non sunt figurae, non magis quam suadere,

    Quint. 9, 1, 23:

    Romanos nec magis jam dolo capi quam armis vinci posse,

    Liv. 10, 4, 10:

    pro certo habens non magis Antonio eripi se quam Caesari Brutum posse,

    Sen. Suas. 6, 17:

    non magis Alexandri saevitiam quam Bessi parricidium ferre potuisse,

    Curt. 7, 6, 15; cf.:

    nec magis post proelium quam in proelio caedibus temperatum est,

    Liv. 2, 16, 9. —Followed by atque instead of quam (rare):

    non Apollinis magis verum atque hoc responsum est,

    Ter. And. 4, 2, 15.— With the comp. abl. (rare):

    quid philosophia magis colendum?

    Cic. Fin. 3, 22, 76:

    quanto magis Aliensi die Aliam ipsam reformidaturos?

    Liv. 6, 28, 6 Weissenb. ad loc.:

    quam Juno fertur terris magis omnibus unam... coluisse,

    Verg. A. 1, 15 (cf. B. 3. infra):

    Albanum sive Falernum Te magis appositis delectat,

    Hor. S. 2, 8, 17.—
    (γ).
    With pronn.:

    quid habetis, qui mage immortales vos credam esse quam ego siem?

    Plaut. Poen. 1, 2, 64:

    quis homo sit magis meus quam tu es?

    id. Mil. 3, 1, 20:

    quam mage amo quam matrem meam,

    id. Truc. 3, 1, 17; cf.:

    quem ego ecastor mage amo quam me,

    id. ib. 4, 4, 34.—With utrum, followed by an:

    jam scibo, utrum haec me mage amet, an marsupium,

    Plaut. Men. 2, 3, 35.—With the abl. instead of quam:

    nec magis hac infra quicquam est in corpore nostro,

    Lucr. 3, 274; Verg. A. 1, 15.—
    (δ).
    With adjj. and advv., and esp. with those which do not admit the comparative termination (most freq. without adding the second term of the comparison; v. under b. d): numquam potuisti mihi Magis opportunus advenire quam advenis, Plaut. Most. 3, 1, 47:

    neque lac lacti magis est simile, quam ille ego similis est mei,

    id. Am. 2, 1, 54:

    ars magis magna atque uber, quam difficilis et obscura,

    Cic. de Or. 1, 42, 190:

    corpora magna magis quam firma,

    Liv. 5, 44, 4:

    vultu pulchro magis quam venusto,

    Suet. Ner. 51.—With the abl., Plaut. As. 3, 3, 114:

    neque ego hoc homine quemquam vidi magis malum,

    id. Ps. 4, 1, 27:

    ab secundis rebus magis etiam solito incauti,

    Liv. 5, 44, 6.—With compp. (adding to their force):

    ita fustibus sum mollior miser magis quam ullus cinaedus,

    Plaut. Aul. 3, 2, 8. —
    b.
    Without the addition of the second term.
    (α).
    With verbs: ergo plusque magisque viri nunc gloria claret, Enn. ap. Macr. S. 6, 1 (Ann. v. 315 Vahl.):

    sapiunt magis,

    Plaut. Bacch. 3, 3, 4:

    magis curae est, magisque afformido, ne, etc.,

    id. ib. 4, 10, 3:

    magis metuant,

    id. Mil. 5, 44:

    tum magis id diceres, Fanni, si, etc.,

    Cic. Lael. 7 fin.; cf. id. Rep. 1, 40, 62:

    cum Pompeius ita contendisset, ut nihil umquam magis,

    id. Fam. 1, 9, 20:

    magis velle, for malle: quod magis vellem evenire,

    Ter. Eun. 5, 7, 1; Val. Fl. 3, 270.—
    (β).
    With substt.: non ex jure manum consertum sed magi' ferro, Enn. ap. Gell. 20, 10 (Ann. v. 276 Vahl.):

    magis aedilis fieri non potuisset,

    better, finer, Cic. Planc. 24, 60.—
    (γ).
    With pronn.:

    ecastor neminem hodie mage Amat corde atque animo suo,

    Plaut. Truc. 1, 2, 75.—
    (δ).
    With adjj. and advv. (so most freq.).—With adjj.:

    ut quadam magis necessaria ratione recte sit vivendum,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 3, 1, § 2:

    magis anxius,

    Ov. M. 1, 182:

    hic magis tranquillu'st,

    Plaut. Bacch. 5, 2, 55:

    nihil videtur mundius, nec magis compositum quicquam, nec magis elegans,

    Ter. Eun. 5, 4, 12:

    nemo fuit magis severus nec magis continens,

    id. ib. 2, 1, 21:

    quod est magis verisimile,

    Caes. B. G. 3, 13, 6:

    magis admirabilis oratio,

    Quint. 8, 3, 24:

    magis communia verba,

    id. 8, 2, 24 et saep.; rare: magis quam in aliis = praeter ceteros;

    nescio quo pacto magis quam in aliis suum cuique pulchrum est,

    Cic. Tusc. 5, 22, 63.— With advv.:

    magis aperte,

    Ter. Ad. 4, 5, 30:

    magis impense,

    id. ib. 5, 9, 36.—With compp. adding to their force:

    magis est dulcius,

    Plaut. Stich. 5, 4, 22:

    magis majores nugae,

    id. Men. prol. 55:

    magis modum in majorem,

    id. Am. 1, 1, 145:

    contentiores mage erunt,

    id. Poen. 2, 15.—
    2.
    Strengthened.
    a.
    By etiam, multo, tanto, eo, hoc, quo, tam, quam; and negatively, nihilo:

    qualis in dicendo Hierocles Alabandeus, magis etiam Menecles, frater ejus, fuit,

    Cic. Brut. 95, 325; id. Off. 1, 21, 72:

    illud ad me, ac multo etiam magis ad vos,

    id. de Or. 2, 32, 139:

    tanto magis Dic, quis est?

    Plaut. Bacch. 3, 6, 28:

    ut quidque magis contemplor, tanto magis placet,

    id. Most. 3, 2, 146:

    vicina cacumina caelo, quam sint magis, tanto magis fument,

    Lucr. 6, 460:

    quanto ille plura miscebat, tanto hic magis in dies convalescebat,

    Cic. Mil. 9, 25:

    sed eo magis cauto est Opus, ne huc exeat, qui, etc.,

    Plaut. Most. 4, 2, 22:

    atque eo magis, si, etc.,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 3, 1, § 1:

    eoque magis quod, etc.,

    id. Lael. 2, 7; Caes. B. G. 1, 23; 1, 47; 3, 14;

    5, 1: immo vero etiam hoc magis, quam illi veteres, quod, etc.,

    Cic. Agr. 2, 35, 97:

    hoc vero magis properare Varro, ut, etc.,

    Caes. B. C. 2, 20:

    quo magis cogito ego cum meo animo,

    Plaut. Most. 3, 2, 13; Nep. Thras. 2:

    magis quam id reputo, tam magis uror,

    Plaut. Bacch. 5, 1, 5:

    tam magis illa fremens... Quam magis, etc.,

    Verg. A. 7, 787:

    quanto mage... tam magis,

    Lucr. 4, 81 sq.:

    quam magis in pectore meo foveo, quas meus filius turbas turbet... magis curae est magisque afformido, ne, etc.,

    Plaut. Bacch. 4, 10, 1; 4, 4, 27; id. Men. 1, 1, 19:

    quam magis te in altum capessis, tam aestus te in portum refert,

    id. As. 1, 3, 6:

    densior hinc suboles Quam magis, etc.,

    Verg. G. 3, 309:

    cum Vercingetorix nihilo magis in aequum locum descenderet,

    Caes. B. G. 6, 53.—
    b.
    By reduplication: magis magisque, magis et magis, magis ac magis; and poet. also, magis magis, more and more: ex desiderio magis magisque maceror, Afran. ap. Charis. p. 182 P.:

    cum cotidie magis magisque perditi homines tectis ac templis urbis minarentur,

    Cic. Phil. 1, 2, 5; id. Fam. 2, 18, 2; 16, 21, 2; Sall. C. 5, 7; cf. Cic. Fil. Fam. 16, 21, 2:

    de Graecia cotidie magis et magis cogito,

    Cic. Att. 14, 18, 4; 16, 3, 1; id. Brut. 90, 308; Liv. 7, 32, 6; Sall. J. 8, 6:

    magis deinde ac magis,

    Suet. Vit. 10:

    post hoc magis ac magis,

    id. Gram. 3;

    for which also: magisque ac magis deinceps,

    id. Tit. 3; Tac. A. 14, 8; Sen. de Ira, 3, 1, 4; id. Ep. 114, 25; id. Ben. 2, 14, 4; Plin. Ep. 1, 12, 10; 7, 3, 4; 10, 28, 3.— Poet. also:

    magis atque magis,

    Verg. A. 12, 239; Cat. 68, 48:

    post, vento crescente, magis magis increbescunt,

    id. 64, 275; cf. Verg. G. 4, 311.—
    3.
    Pleon.
    a.
    With potius (anteclass.):

    magis decorum'st Libertum potius quam patronum onus in via portare,

    Plaut. As. 3, 3, 99:

    mihi magis lubet cum probis potius quam cum improbis vivere,

    id. Trin. 2, 1, 38.—
    b.
    With malle: quam cum lego, nihil malo quam has res relinquere;

    his vero auditis multo magis,

    Cic. Tusc. 1, 31, 76:

    finge enim malle eum magis suum consequi quam, etc.,

    Dig. 17, 2, 52, § 10. —
    C.
    In partic.: non (neque) magis quam.
    1.
    To signify perfect equality between two enunciations, no more... than; just as much... as; or neg., no more... than; just as little... as:

    domus erat non domino magis ornamento quam civitati,

    i. e. just as much to the city as to its owner, Cic. Verr. 2, 4, 3, § 5; Planc. ap. Cic. Fam. 10, 4, 2:

    non Hannibale magis victo a se quam Q. Fabio,

    Liv. 22, 27, 2:

    conficior enim maerore, mea Terentia, nec me meae miseriae magis excruciant quam tuae vestraeque,

    Cic. Fam. 13, 3, 1; Liv. 9, 22.— Neg.: qui est enim animus in aliquo morbo... non magis est sanus, quam id corpus, quod in morbo est, i. e. is just as far from being sound as a body, etc., Cic. Tusc. 3, 5, 10:

    si aliqua in re Verris similis fuero, non magis mihi deerit inimicus quam Verri defuit,

    id. Verr. 2, 3, 69, § 162; id. Fam. 5, 12, 3; id. de Or. 2, 8, 31:

    non nascitur itaque ex malo bonum, non magis quam ficus ex olea,

    Sen. Ep. 87, 25;

    Quint. prooem. § 26: non magis Gaium imperaturum, quam per Baianum sinum equis discursurum,

    Suet. Calig. 19. —Ellipt.:

    nec eo magis lege liberi sunto,

    just as little from that as from the rest, Cic. Leg. 3, 4, 11.—
    2.
    For restricting the idea expressed in the clause with non magis, so that not more, according to a common figure of speech, = less; in Engl. not so much... as; less... than:

    deinde credas mihi affirmanti velim, me hoc non pro Lysone magis quam pro omnibus scribere,

    Cic. Fam. 13, 24; Planc. ap. Cic. Fam. 10, 17:

    miserebat non poenae magis homines, quam sceleris, quo poenam meriti essent,

    Liv. 2, 5; 1, 28.—
    3.
    Magis minusve, magis aut minus, or magis ac minus; post-Aug. for the usual plus minusve, more or less:

    sed istud magis minusve vitiosum est pro personis dicentium,

    Quint. 11, 1, 27; Plin. 17, 24, 37, § 220:

    minora vero plerumque sunt talia, ut pro persona, tempore, loco, causa magis ac minus vel excusata debeant videri vel reprehendenda,

    Quint. 11, 1, 14; Plin. 37, 5, 18, § 67:

    quaedam tamen et nationibus puto magis aut minus convenire,

    Sen. Ep. 40, 11; cf.:

    quosdam minus aut magis osos veritatem,

    id. Suas. 1, 5:

    aut minus, aut magis,

    id. Ep. 82, 14.—
    4.
    With alius... alio, etc.: ceterae philosophorum disciplinae, omnino alia magis alia, sed tamen omnes, one more than another, i. e. in different degrees, Cic. Fin. 3, 3, 11 Madvig. ad loc. (al.:

    alia magis, alia minus, v. Hand, Turs. III. p. 560): mihi videntur omnes quidem illi errasse... sed alius alio magis,

    Cic. Fin. 4, 16, 43:

    sunt omnino omnes fere similes, sed declarant communis notiones, alia magis alia,

    id. Tusc. 4, 24, 53:

    alii aliis magis recusare,

    Liv. 29, 15, 11.— Sup.: maxĭmē( maxŭmē), in the highest degree, most of all, most particularly, especially, exceedingly, very, etc.
    A.
    Lit.
    1.
    Alone.
    a.
    With a verb:

    haec una res in omni libero populo maximeque in pacatis tranquillisque civitatibus praecipue semper floruit,

    Cic. de Or. 1, 8, 30:

    quid commemorem primum aut laudem maxime?

    Ter. Eun. 5, 9, 14; 3, 1, 79:

    nos coluit maxime,

    id. Ad. 3, 2, 54:

    quem convenire maxime cupiebam,

    Plaut. Pers. 2, 4, 30; id. As. 3, 3, 133:

    de te audiebamus ea, quae maxime vellemus,

    Cic. Fam. 12, 25, a, 7; cf. id. Att. 13, 1:

    extra quos (fines) egredi non possim, si maxime velim,

    id. Quint. 10, 35:

    in re publica maxime conservanda sunt jura belli,

    most especially, id. Off. 1, 11, 33: huic legioni Caesar propter virtutem confidebat maxime, [p. 1101] Caes. B. G. 1, 40:

    quem Homero crederet maxime accedere,

    came nearest to, Quint. 10, 1, 86; cf.

    pugnare,

    most violently, Plaut. Am. 1, 1, 271; 1, 1, 44:

    jubere,

    most positively, id. Bacch. 4, 9, 80:

    id enim est profecto, quod constituta religione rem publicam contineat maxime,

    Cic. Leg. 2, 27, 69; cf. maxime fin.:

    ab eo exordiri volui maxime,

    id. Off. 1, 2, 4:

    cernere naturae vim maxime,

    id. Tusc. 1, 15, 35.—
    b.
    With an adj.:

    res maxime necessaria,

    Cic. Lael. 23, 86:

    loca maxime frumentaria,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 10:

    loci ad hoc maxime idonei,

    Quint. 1, 11, 13:

    maxime naturali carent amicitia,

    Cic. Lael. 21, 80:

    maxime feri,

    Caes. B. G. 2, 4:

    qui eo tempore maxime plebi acceptus erat,

    id. ib. 1, 3:

    idem ad augendam eloquentiam maxime accommodati erunt,

    Quint. 1, 11, 13:

    elegans maxime auctor,

    id. 10, 1, 93:

    maxime vero commune est quaerere, an sit honesta? etc.,

    id. 2, 4, 37:

    noto enim maxime utar exemplo,

    id. 7, 3, 3.—So with supp.:

    quae maxime liberalissima,

    Cic. Att. 12, 38, 3:

    maxime gravissimam omniumque (rerum),

    Liv. 41, 23, 4 MS. (dub.: maxumam gravissimamque, Weissenb.). —
    c.
    With numerals, at most:

    puer ad annos maxime natus octo,

    Gell. 17, 8, 4.—
    d.
    With an adv.:

    ut dicatis quam maxime ad veritatem accommodate,

    Cic. de Or. 1, 33, 149 (v. infra 2).—
    2.
    Strengthened by unus, unus omnium, omnium, multo, vel, tam, quam, etc. (supply potest):

    qui proelium unus maxime accenderat,

    Curt. 5, 2, 5:

    cum sua modestia unus omnium maxime floreret,

    Nep. Milt. 1, 1:

    quae maxime omnium belli avida,

    Liv. 23, 49; 4, 59; cf. Drak. ad Liv. 36, 19, 4:

    atque ea res multo maxime disjunxit illum ab illa,

    Ter. Hec. 1, 2, 85:

    imperium populi Romani multo maxime miserabile visum est,

    Sall. C. 36, 4:

    illud mihi videtur vel maxime confirmare, etc.,

    Cic. N. D. 2, 65, 162:

    hoc enim uno praestamus vel maxime feris,

    id. de Or. 1, 8, 32:

    quae quidem vel maxime suspicionem movent,

    id. Part. Or. 33, 114:

    quam potes, tam verba confer maxime ad compendium,

    as much as possible, Plaut. Mil. 3, 1, 186:

    ego jubeo quam maxime unam facere nos hanc familiam,

    Ter. Ad. 5, 8, 2:

    ut quam maxime permaneant diuturna corpora,

    Cic. Tusc. 1, 45, 108; id. de Or. 1, 34, 154:

    quo mihi rectius videtur, memoriam nostri quam maxime longam efficere,

    Sall. C. 1, 3:

    ceterum illum juvenem incipere a quam maxime facili ac favorabili causa velim,

    Quint. 12, 6, 6.—
    3.
    With the relative qui in the phrases, quam qui maxime and ut qui maxime:

    tam enim sum amicus rei publicae, quam qui maxime,

    as any one whatever, Cic. Fam. 5, 2, 6:

    grata ea res, ut quae maxime senatui umquam fuit,

    Liv. 5, 25; 7, 33.—
    4.
    With ut quisque... ita (maxime, potissimum or minime), the more... the more (or less):

    hoc maxime officii est, ut quisque maxime opis indigeat, ita ei potissimum opitulari,

    Cic. Off. 1, 15, 49:

    ut quisque magnitudine animae maxime excellit, ita maxime, etc.,

    id. ib. 1, 19, 64; cf.

    , in the contrary order: colendum autem esse ita quemque maxime, ut quisque maxime virtutibus his lenioribus erit ornatus,

    id. ib. 1, 15, 47:

    ut enim quisque maxime ad suum commodum refert, quaecumque agit, ita minime est vir bonus,

    id. Leg. 1, 18, 49.—
    5.
    In gradations, to denote the first and most desirable, first of all, in the first place:

    hujus industriam maxime quidem vellem, ut imitarentur ii, quos oportebat: secundo autem loco, ne alterius labori inviderent,

    Cic. Phil. 8, 10, 31; cf. id. Caecin. 9, 23:

    si per eum reductus insidiose redissem, me scilicet maxime sed proxime illum quoque fefellissem,

    id. Rab. Post. 12, 33:

    in quo genere sunt maxime oves, deinde caprae,

    Varr. R. R. 2, 9, 1:

    maxime... dein,

    Plin. 9, 16, 23, § 56:

    sed vitem maxime populus videtur alere, deinde ulmus, post etiam fraxinus,

    Col. 5, 6, 4:

    maxime... deinde... postea... minume,

    Plin. 37, 12, 75, § 196:

    maxime... postea... ultimae,

    Col. 6, 3, 6:

    post Chium maxime laudatur Creticum, mox Aegyptium,

    Plin. 18, 7, 17, § 77.—
    B.
    Transf.
    1.
    Like potissimum, to give prominence to an idea, especially, particularly, principally:

    quae ratio poetas, maximeque Homerum impulit, ut, etc.,

    Cic. N. D. 2, 6, 6; Varr. R. R. 1, 51, 1:

    scribe aliquid, et maxime, si Pompeius Italia cedit,

    Cic. Att. 7, 12, 4: de Cocceio et Libone quae scribis, approbo:

    maxime quod de judicatu meo,

    id. ib. 12, 19, 2; id. Fin. 5, 1, 1:

    cognoscat etiam rerum gestarum et memoriae veteris ordinem, maxime scilicet nostrae civitatis,

    id. Or. 34, 120; id. Att. 13, 1, 2.—So in the connection, cum... tum maxime; tum... tum maxime; ut... tum maxime, but more especially:

    scio et perspexi saepe: cum antehac, tum hodie maxime,

    Plaut. Mil. 4, 8, 56:

    plena exemplorum est nostra res publica, cum saepe, tum maxime bello Punico secundo,

    Cic. Off. 3, 11, 47; id. Att. 11, 6, 1; id. Fl. 38, 94:

    tum exercitationibus crebris atque magnis, tum scribendo maxime persequatur,

    id. de Or. 2, 23, 96:

    longius autem procedens, ut in ceteris eloquentiae partibus, tum maxime, etc.,

    id. Brut. 93, 320.— With nunc, nuper, tum, cum, just, precisely, exactly: Me. Quid? vostrum patri Filii quot eratis? M. Su. Ut nunc maxime memini, duo, just now, Plaut. Men. 5, 9, 58:

    cum iis, quos nuper maxime liberaverat,

    Caes. B. C. 3, 9:

    ipse tum maxime admoto igne refovebat artus,

    Curt. 8, 4, 25; 6, 6, 10; 5, 7, 2; Liv. 27, 4, 2 Drak.:

    haec cum maxime loqueretur, sex lictores eum circumsistunt valentissimi,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 5, 54, § 142; cf. id. ib. 2, 2, 76, § 187;

    2, 4, 38, § 72: totius autem injustitiae nulla capitalior, quam eorum, qui cum maxime fallunt, id agunt, ut viri boni esse videantur,

    id. Off. 1, 13, 41; Liv. 4, 3; 30, 33:

    tum cum maxime,

    at that precise time, at that moment, Liv. 40, 13, 4; 40, 32, 1; 33, 9, 3; 43, 7, 8; so,

    tunc cum maxime,

    Curt. 3, 2, 17:

    nunc cum maxime,

    Cic. Clu. 5, 12; id. Sen. 11, 38; Liv. 29, 17, 7; v. 2. cum.—
    2.
    In colloquial lang., to denote emphatic assent, certainly, by all means, very well, yes; and with immo, to express emphatic dissent, certainly not, by no means: Ar. Jace, pater, talos, ut porro nos jaciamus. De. Maxime, Plaut. As. 5, 2, 54; id. Curc. 2, 3, 36: Th. Nisi quid magis Es occupatus, operam mihi da. Si. Maxime, id. Most. 4, 3, 17; Ter. And. 4, 5, 23: Ca. Numquid peccatum est, Simo? Si. Immo maxime, Plaut. Ps. 1, 5, 80; Ter. Hec. 2, 1, 31:

    scilicet res ipsa aspera est, sed vos non timetis eam. Immo vero maxime,

    Sall. C. 52, 28 (v. immo); v. Hand, Turs. III. p. 552-607.
    2.
    Magnus, i, m., a Roman surname, e. g. Cn. Pompeius Magnus; v. Pompeius.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > maxumus

  • 15 QUANDO

    when, time - время, когда; шестая из десяти аристотелевских категорий. Сравн. TEMPUS.

    Латинские философские термины > QUANDO

  • 16 SYNCATEGOREMATICE

    syncategorematically - синкатегорематично; говорят вещь должна быть такой или такой синкатегорематично, потому что потенциально она такова, например, математическое количество, которое может быть мыслимо без любого другого термина, говорят, синкатегорематично является бесконечным. TEMPUS (time), время; согласно Аристотелю время (хронос) есть число движения в соответствии с предыдущим и последующим; отсюда измерение продолжительности изменчивых вещей; противостоит вечности; мера устойчивых вещей с точки зрения субстанции и продолжительности; по отношению к вечности (aevum) - промежуточное измерение неизменного бытия, которое, тем не менее, допускает некоторое изменение в отношении действия. Так, небесные сферы подвержены только локальным движениям; время иногда используется широко и включает aevum.

    Латинские философские термины > SYNCATEGOREMATICE

  • 17 ne [2]

    2. nē, die urspr. u. eig. latein. Verneinungspartikel, als Adv. = nicht, als Coniunction = daß nicht, damit nicht, und, mit Verkürzung des Vokals, , als enklitisches Fragewort = etwa nicht? doch nicht? ob etwa nicht? (s. 3. ne).

    I) , als Adv., nicht, A) als Verneinung eines Begriffes, der als sinnlich od. geistig wahrgenommen aufgefaßt wird. In dieser Weise findet sich ne nur in der älteren Zeit der Sprache gebraucht, während sonst gew. non zur Verneinung dient, nisi tu ne vis, Plaut.: operae ne parcunt, Plaut.: crescere ne possunt fruges, Lucr. – In der ausgebildeten Sprache hat es sich so erhalten in Zusammensetzungen, wie nefas, nemo (= ne-homo), ne-scio, ne-quaquam, nedum, ne-uter, nullus, numquam, nusquam, necopinus, necubi, negotium u.a.

    B) als Verneinung eines Begriffes, der als vorgestellt und daher nur als möglich aufgefaßt wird, 1) in der Verbindung ne... quidem (ne quidem ohne dazwischengesetztes Wort bei Gaius inst. 1, 67 u. 3, 93), die das Wort oder die Wortverbindung, die verneint werden soll, in die Mitte nimmt, nicht einmal, ne populus quidem, Cic.: ne in oppidis quidem, Cic.: ne cum esset factum quidem, Cic. – Sollen mehrere durch Partikeln verbundene Wortbegriffe verneint werden, so steht ne... quidem nur bei dem ersten, ne Aequi quidem ac Volsci, Liv.: ne a sententiis quidem aut verbis, Quint. – Ebenso wird bei verbundenen Sätzen ne... quidem nur im ersten gesetzt, ita ut ne efferendi quidem signa Romanis spatium nec ad explicandam aciem locus esset, Liv. – Durch ne... quidem wird der ganze Satz verneint, cum mendaci homini ne verum quidem dicenti credere soleamus, Cic. – Doch geht sehr häufig eine Negation voraus, non fugio ne hos quidem mores, Cic.: numquam illum ne minimā quidem re offendi, Cic. – Wenn daher zwei Satzglieder miteinander verbunden werden, von denen das eine den schwächeren Gedanken durch non modo (nicht eben, nicht gerade, nicht nur), das andere den stärkeren durch ne... quidem ausdrückt, so kann bei jenem non als seine eigene Negation gesetzt, aber auch weggelassen u. aus dem mit ne... quidem gebildeten Satze entnommen werden, jedoch nur dann, wenn beide Satzglieder einerlei Prädikat haben, mihi vero quidquid accĭderit ne recusanti quidem, non modo non repugnanti, Cic.: ne sues quidem id velint, non modo ipse, nicht bloß ich nicht, Cic.: duas res non modo agere uno tempore, sed ne cogitando quidem explicare potest, Cic. – Häufig bedeutet ne... quidem a) geschweige, viel weniger, wenn der Satz eine Steigerung enthält, nullum est fatum: ita ne divinatio quidem, Cic. – b) keineswegs, wenn ein anderer Satz mit sed (sondern), etiam (sogar), sed etiam (sondern sogar) entgegengesetzt wird, is utitur consilio ne suorum quidem, sed suo, Cic.: ergo illi ne causa quidem itineris, etiam manendi, Cic.: ne conivente quidem te, sed etiam hilarioribus oculis intuente, Cic. – c) natürlich nicht, gewiß nicht, wenn ein abgeleiteter Gedanke angeschlossen wird, carēre enim sentientis est: nec sensus in mortuo: ne carēre quidem igitur in mortuo est, Cic.: egone ut te interpellem? ne hoc quidem vellem, Cic. – 2) in der Verbindung ne... quoque = ne... quidem, auch nicht einmal, sese, inquit, ne id quoque, quod tum suaderet, facturum esse, Cl. Quadr. ann. 1. fr. 17 (bei Gell. 17, 2, 18): ceterum quando ne ea quoque temptata vis proficeret, consilio grassandum, Liv. 10, 14, 13: u. so auch Gell. 1, 2, 5 u. 20, 1, 15: in Verbindungen, wie ne quis, ne qui, ne quando u.a., iustitiae primum munus est, ut ne cui quis noceat, Cic.: ut ne qua scintilla relinquatur, Cic.: ut ne quando amare inciperemus, Cic.

    C) zur Verneinung eines Begriffes, der als gewollt u. übh. als von einer Willenstätigkeit abhängig aufgefaßt wird: AA) in unabhängigen Sätzen: 1) in Sätzen, die eine Bitte, eine Aufforderung, einen Befehl enthalten, nicht, a) neben dem Imperativ, ne crucia te, Ter.: ne nega, verred' es nicht! Ter.: ne time, Plaut.: ne metue, Sen. rhet.: fratrem ne desere, Verg.: ne gravare, Plin. ep.: ne timete, Liv.: ne repugnate vestro bono, Sen.: impius ne audeto placare donis iram deorum, Cic. – b) neben dem Konjunktiv (des Präsens od. Perfekts), ne me moneatis, Plaut.: ne forte pudori sit tibi Musa, Hor.: ne tot annorum felicitatem in unius horae dederis discrimen, Liv. – Häufig wird ein mit ne gebildeter Satz ohne Verbindungspartikel nach einer Einräumung gesetzt, sint sane liberales ex sociorum fortunis, misericordes in furibus aerarii, ne illi sanguinem nostrum largiantur, doch unser Blut sollen sie nicht vergeuden, Sall.: tu vero istam Romae legem rogato: nobis nostras ne ademeris, Cic. – Ebenso steht ein mit ne gebildeter Satz ohne Verbindungspartikel, wenn der in ihm enthaltene Gedanke aus einem anderen abgeleitet wird, nec nunc adulteria obiecturum ait, ne domum reposceret, noch weniger wolle er den Palast zurückverlangen, Tac. ann. 11, 30 (wo Halm nedum). – 2) in Sätzen, die eine Einräumung enthalten, gesetzt, daß nicht, zugegeben, daß nicht, ne sit sane summum malum dolor: malum certe est, Cic.: ne sit igitur sol, ne luna, ne stellae, Cic.: ne aequaveritis Hannibali Philippum, ne Carthaginiensibus Macedonas, Pyrrho certe aequabitis, Liv. – 3) in Sätzen, die einen Wunsch enthalten, nicht, doch nicht, ne id Iuppiter optimus maximus sirit, Liv. – bes. häufig utinam ne (wofür auch utinam non stehen kann), illud utinam ne vere scriberem, Cic. – Dah. wird ne auch bei Beteuerungen gesetzt, ne vivam, si scio, ich will des Todes sein, Cic.: ne sim salvus, si aliter scribo ac sentio, ich will nicht gesund sein, Cic.

    BB) in abhängigen Sätzen: 1) in Sätzen aller Art neben einem Komparativ, nicht, ja nicht, ut hoc nostrum desiderium ne plus sit annuum, Cic.: muneris ergo in singulos dari ne minus dena milia aeris, Liv.: noluit quid statui nisi columellam tribus cubitis ne altiorem, Cic. – 2) in Sätzen zur Angabe der Absicht, nicht, ja nicht, nur nicht, te ulciscar, ut ne impune nos illuseris, Cic.: quid vis nobis dare, ut isti abs te ne auferantur, Cic. – 3) in Sätzen zur Angabe eines beabsichtigten Erfolges, nicht, ja nicht, nur nicht, iubeatis ut in civitate ne sit, Cic.: illud assequi possunt, ut ne dedeceat, Cic.: te obsecro, ut ne credas, Ter. – Auch da, wo der Erfolg ein rein faktischer zu sein scheint, liegt der Begriff der Absichtlichkeit des handelnden od. denkenden Subjekts zugrunde, tantum a vallo eius prima acies aberat, uti ne in eam telum adigi posset, daß es nicht möglich sein sollte, Caes.: ex quo efficitur, non ut voluptas ne sit, sed ut voluptas non sit summum bonum, nicht daß die Sinnenlust gar nicht vorhanden sein soll, sondern daß sie nicht das höchste Gut ist, Cic. – 4) in relativen Absichtssätzen, die mit quo (qui) od. quomodo gebildet sind, nicht, ja nicht, ego id agam, mihi qui ne detur, Ter.: quo ne per vacuum Romano incurreret hostis, Hor.: quaeritis maximis sumptibus faciendis quomodo ne tributa conferatis, Rutil. Lup. – 5) in restringierenden Sätzen in den Verbndgg. dum ne, modo ne, dummodo ne, tantum ne, wenn nur nicht, nur nicht, Komik., Cic. u.a.

    II) , als Coniunction, daß nicht, damit nicht, A) in Sätzen zur Angabe der Absicht, daß nicht, damit nicht, gallinae pennis fovent pullos, ne frigore laedantur, Cic.: dolorem saepe perpetiuntur, ne incĭdant in maiorem Cic.: ne vana urbis magnitudo esset, asylum aperit, Liv.: nemo prudens punit, quia peccatum est, sed ne peccetur, Sen. – Häufig bezieht sich ne auf ein die Absicht andeutendes Wort, wie ideo, idcirco, propter hoc u.a., an ideo aliquid scripsit, ne videretur? Cic.: idcirco capite et superciliis semper erat rasis, ne ullum pilum viri boni habere dicatur, Cic. – Zuw. steht ein mit ne gebildeter Satz vor einem anderen, der eine Behauptung od. Erzählung enthält, um die Absicht anzugeben, in der die Mitteilung gemacht wird. Zur Vervollständigung der Gedankenreihe müßte ein Satz wie »so behaupte, erwähne ich, daß« beigefügt sein, der aber im Lat., wie im Deutschen, oft ausgelassen wird, ne tamen ignores, quo sit Romana loco res, Cantaber Agrippae... virtute cecĭdit, Hor.: daher ne multa dicam, ne multa od. multis, kurz, Cic.

    B) in Sätzen zur Angabe eines beabsichtigten Erfolges, daß nicht, 1) nach Verben, die eine Willensäußerung bezeichnen, hoc te rogo, ne demittas animum, Cic.: toti exercitui imperavit, ne iniussu concurrerent, Caes.: malo, ne roges, Cic.: Macedonas monebat, ne moverentur, Iustin.: ne quis insepultus esset, rerum natura prospexit, Sen.: ne quam occasionem dimitteret, cogitabat, Caes. – 2) nach Ausdrücken, die eine Aussage enthalten, die eine Willenstätigkeit voraussetzt, quidam ne umquam riderent, consecuti sunt, Sen.: vestra interest, ne imperatorem pessimi faciant, Tac.: aegre retentis militibus est factum, ne proelio contenderetur, Caes.: potestis efficere, ut male moriar: ne moriar, non potestis, Plin. ep.: reliquum est, ne quid stulte, ne quid temere dicam aut faciam, Cic.

    / Als Eigentümlichkeit ist zu bemerken: 1) daß ne durch »daß« od. den bloßen Infinitiv wiedergegeben wird: a) nach den Verben »sich hüten (cavēre), verhindern (impedire, resistere), verbieten (interdicere, seltener vetare), sich weigern (recusare)«, weil der negative Begriff, der in diesen Verben enthalten ist, auch auf den abhängigen Satz übertragen wird, s. caveo, im-pedio, re-sisto usw. – Zuw. steht auch ne, wenn aus dem Verbum des Hauptsatzes der Begriff eines der angegebenen Verben herausgenommen werden kann, Decii corpus ne inveniretur, nox quaerentes oppressit, Liv. – b) nach allen Verben u. Ausdrücken, die den Begriff der Furcht u. Besorgnis haben (wie timere, metuere, vereri, horrere, pavere; terrere, conterrere; timor est, metus est, spes est, periculum est), weil in ihnen der Begriff eines vergeblichen Wunsches enthalten ist, s. timeo, metuo usw. – Wenn der abhängige Satz negativ ist, steht ne non, zB. timeo, ne non impetrem, Cic.: vereor, ne sufficere non possim, Curt.: non vereor, ne non scribendo te expleam, Cic.: non est periculum, ne idem facere non possit, Cic. – 2) daß ne nach den Verben »sehen, zusehen, untersuchen, erwägen« häufig statt durch daß nicht auch durch ob etwa übersetzt werden kann, cum circumspiceret, ne quid praeteriisset, Varro: singuli pulli tentandi, ne quid habeant in gutture, Colum.: videamus, ne beata vita effici possit, Cic.: qui, ne quod telum occultaretur, exquirerent, Cic.: ähnlich per aliquot dies ea consultatio tenuit, ne non reddita (bona Tarquinii) belli causa, reddita belli materia essent, es dauerte die Erwägung, ob die unterlassene Zurückgabe den Krieg veranlasse, Liv. – Dah. auch ne non = ob etwa nicht, credere omnia, vide, ne non sit necesse, Cic.: cogitandum sit, ne tutior non sit, Cic. – 3) daß ne durch geschweige daß wiedergegeben wird, wenn aus einer weitergreifenden Behauptung der Schluß gezogen werden soll, daß eine eingeschränktere nach dem Vorausgegangenen unzulässig erscheine, zB. vix incedo inanis, ne ire posse cum onere existumes, Plaut. Amph. 330: me vero nihil istorum ne iuvenem quidem movit umquam, ne nunc senem (sc. moveret), Cic. ep. 9, 26, 2: u. so Ter. Andr. 706. Cic. Planc. 27 u. Verr. 4, 52. Sall. Cat. 11, 8. Liv. 3, 52, 9. Tac. ann. 11, 30 N.

    lateinisch-deutsches > ne [2]

  • 18 quam

    quam, Adv. (Akkusativform von qui, analog mit tam), auf welche Weise, wie, emphatischin welchem Grade, wie sehr, I) in der Korrelation: A) in Vergleichungen, a) in der Korrel. mit tam, s. 1. tam. – m. ausgelassenem tam: homo non, quam isti sunt, gloriosus, Liv.: exibit quam saepe, time, Tibull.: quam si = tamquam si, gleich als wenn, als ob, wie, Cic. Planc. 60. – So, mit u. ohne tam, namentlich α) bei possum (queo), zB. tam consimilis (imago) est, quam potest, so ähnlich wie möglich, möglichst ähnlich, Plaut.: tam confido, quam potest, so sehr wie möglich, Plaut. – gew. mit ausgelassenem tam, tusa cribrataque vino qu. possit excellenti, so ausgezeichnetem wie möglich, Plin.: öfter beim Superl., qu. maximā possum voce dico, mit so sehr starker St. wie möglich, Cic.: qu. queas minimo, Ter.: quam verissime potero, Sall.: quam maximis potest itineribus, Caes.: qu. celerrime potuit, Caes. – u. elliptisch ohne possum, möglichst, recht sehr, gar sehr, bei Adii. u. Advv. im Posit. u. Superl., cena quam opima, Auct. b. Hisp.: sementes quam maximas facere, Caes.: quam plurimi colles, Caes.: quam plurimi dies, Plin. ep.: hortor, ut quam plurima proferas, Plin. ep.: quam plurimo (möglichst teuer) vendere, Cic.: suos valde quam paucos habet, gar sehr wenige, Brut. in Cic. ep.: nimis quam, möglichst sehr, gar sehr, Plaut.: quam familiariter, Ter. – qu. maximus numerus, eine möglichst große Z., Caes.: qu. saepissime, möglichst oft, Cic.: qu. maxime, s. māximē( unter magis) no. I, B, a: qu. primum, sobald wie möglich, möglichst bald, Cic. u.a. – bei Verbb.: nam, quod de Pompeio Caninius agit, sane quam refrixit, Cic. ad Q. fr. 2, 4 (6), 5 – β) (mit ausgelass. tam): quam longus est, so lang... ist, d.i. der (die, das) ganze lange, nocte, quam longa est, die ganze lange N., Verg.: hiemem, quam longa (est), den g. l. Winter, Verg – b) in der Korrel. mit tantus, tanti, tanto, s. tantus. – c) in der Korrel. mit sic: quam multā grandine nimbi crepitant, sic heros... pulsat, Verg. Aen. 5, 458 sq.; u. mit ausgelass. sic, Verg. Aen. 6, 305 sqq. – d) in der Korrelation mit einem Komparativ und mit Begriffen, die eine vergleichende Beziehung zulassen, wie, als, maior pecunia, qu. quanta, Cic.: plures, qu. quot, Cic., u. bl. plures, quam, Liv.: plus, quam quod, Cic.: nihil est magis timendum, quam etc., Cic.: his quam physicis potius credendum, Cic.: prius quam, s. prius. – u. quam qui, quam ut nach dem den zu hohen Grad bezeichnenden Komparativ, maior sum, quam cui possit etc., zu groß, als daß usw., Ov.: indulgebat sibi liberius, quam ut etc., Nep. – nach magis mit Positiv zur Umschreibung des Komparativs, magis audacter, quam parate, Cic.; u. nach dem Komparativ st. magis mit Positiv, vehementius quam caute, Tac. – regelmäßig auch im zweiten Gliede der Komparativ des Adi. u. Adv. (wo im Deutschen der Positiv steht), wenn angegeben werden soll, daß die erste Eigenschaft die zweite überwiegt, deutsch gew. mehr mit Positiv... als mit Positiv, longior quam latior, Cic.: libentius qu. verius, Cic. – durch eine Art Anakoluth beide Adii. im Positiv, indem die vergleichende Beziehung, die anfänglich nicht berücksichtigt wurde, nachträglich hinzugefügt wird (vgl. Passows griech. Handwörterb. unter ἤ), tacita bona est mulier quam loquens, mehr als eine, Plaut.: claris maioribus quam vetustis, mehr als von alten Ahnen, Tac. – ebenso in der Vergleichung zweier Subst., nec me mea ars, quam benevolentia perturbat, mehr als, Curt.: cedere loco consilii quam formidinis arbitrantur, mehr als der F., Tac. – in der Korrel. mit einem Superl. in der Bedeutung eines gesteigerten Compar., cum tyranno, quam qui umquam saevissimo, Liv. – nach den eine Vergleichung zulassenden Verben malle und pleon. magis malle, potius malle, s. mālo: nach praestat, Caes. b. G. 7, 17, 4: nach statuo, Nep. Dat. 8, 1: nach probo, Tac. ann. 1, 58: nach volo, Liv. 3, 68, 11; 25, 29, 6. – nach den eine Vergleichung zulassenden Begriffen, wie nach aeque (ebenso), nach plus (mehr), supra (mehr), ultra (weiter), contra, secus, alius, aliter, alibi, dissimilis, diversus, s.d. WW. – mit ausgelassenem alius, ne quis Asiae rex sit quam ille, keiner (= kein anderer) als usw., Curt.: quid est compati, quam cum alio pati, was ist M. (anderes) als usw., Tert. – so auch nach Zahlbegriffen, haud centesimam partem laudat, quam etc., Plaut.: intra quintum, quam affuerat, diem, Suet.: ut vix dimidium, quam quod acceperat, tradiderit, Liv.: ferramenta duplicia, quam numerus servorum exigit, Colum. – endlich quam pro mit Ablat. eines Subst. nach Komparativen u. Zahlbegriffen, um anzugeben, daß der verglichene Ggstd. mit dem zur Vergleichung gezogenen im Mißverhältnisse steht, deutsch als im Verhältnis zu usw. als man nach Verhältnis des u. des usw. erwarten durfte, proelium atrocius quam pro numero pugnantium editur, Liv.: multiplex quam pro numero damnum est, Liv. – B) in der Korrelation mit Zeitbegriffen, als, nachdem, postero die od. postridie quam etc., Cic.: pridie quam etc., Cic.: saeculis multis ante, quam etc., Cic.: venerunt post diem sextum, quam etc., Cic. fil.: septimo die, quam etc., Liv. – II) außer der Korrelation, zur Bezeichnung des Grades, wie, in welchem Grade, wie sehr, wie wenig, wie so gar nicht, a) in indirekter Rede, α) bei Advv. u. Adii.: memoriā tenetis, quam valde admurmurarint, Cic.: nescis, quam magnum flagitium admiseris, Petron.: quam sint morosi, qui amant, vel ex hoc intellegi potest, Cic.: ut illud, quod cupiat, ostendatur, quam leve, quam contemnendum, quam nihil (wie wenig wert) sit omnino, Cic. – β) bei Verben: nescis, quam doleam, Ter.: illuc intendenda mens, quam omnia ad victoriam spectent, Quint. – attende iam, quam ego defugiam auctoritatem consulatus mei, wie wenig ich meine konsularische Wirksamkeit verleugne, Cic. – b) in der Frage u. im Ausruf, α) bei Advv. u. Adii.: quasi ego, quam dudum? rogem, Ter.: quam multum? Quint. – quam cito illa omnia ex laetitia et voluptate ad luctum et lacrimas recĭderunt! Cic.: quam nihil est totus homuncio! wie so gar nichts, Petron.: quam nihil praetermittis in consilio dando! Cic.: quam multa quam paucis! Cic. – β) bei Verben: quam gaudeo! Ter.: quam timeo, quorsum evadas! Ter.: ut se accusari nolunt, quam cupiunt laudari! Cic.: quam hoc non curo! wie wenig kümmere ich mich darum! Cic.

    lateinisch-deutsches > quam

  • 19 timeo

    timeo, uī, ēre, I) etw. od. jmd. fürchten, vor etw. od. jmd. sich fürchten, in Furcht sein, besorgt sein (Ggstz. sperare, contemnere), m. Acc., alqm, Cic. u. Nep.: inter se, Nep.: insidias, periculum, Curt.: mortem, Ov.: quin tuta times! Ov.: quid timeas scio, Ter.: nihil minus quam tale quidquam timens, Liv.: Passiv, deus frustra timetur, Ov.: timetur argentum, Mart.: pila timetur Parthis (= a Parthis), Lucan.: unpers., omni a parte timetur, ist man in Furcht, Ov. – m. Dat. für wen? noxiam vini aegris, Plin.: patronum iustitiae suae, Quint.: furem caulibus aut pomis, Iuven.: m. pro u. Abl., quid pro quoque timendum sit, Brut. in Cic. ep. ad Brut. 1, 16, 2. – m. folg. ne u. Konj., m. folg. ne non od. ut u. Konj., hoc timet, ne deseras se, Ter.: metuo et timeo, ne hoc tandem propalam fiat nimis, Plaut.: timens, ne suo corpori posset accĭdere, Cic.: neque timerent, ne circumvenirentur, Caes.: timeo, ne non impetrem, Cic.: timeo, ut sustineas, Cic.: quia nihil minus, quam ut egredi obsessi moenibus auderent, timeri poterat, Liv. – m. folg. quo minus u. Konj., quid in me tirone timeat, quo minus mecum velit sermonem conferre, non satis intellego, Augustin. epist. 34, 6. – m. folg. Acc. u. Infin. = fürchten, mit Angst erwarten (s. Müller u. Weißenb. Liv. 2, 7, 9), ni cedenti instaturum (esse) alterum timuissent, Liv.; vgl. im Passiv, propinqua nox et uxorii cubiculi memoria timebantur, Tac. – m. folg. Infin. = sich scheuen, nomen referre in tabulas, Cic.: tantae magnitudinis flumini exercitum obicere, Caes.: sciscitari, Liv.: cenare, Hor.: se demittere in narrationem, Sen. rhet.: findere, Plin.: haud timeam dixisse, Ov.: times sola intrare, Ov.: non times pauper fieri, Lampr. – m. folg. indir. Fragesatz, misera timeo, quid hoc sit negotii, Plaut.: quid agatur, timeo, Cic.: quid possem, timebam, Cic.: quo sint eruptura, timeo, Cic.: so auch mit folg. quorsum, Ter. u. Nep.: zugleich m. Dat. für wen? nunc nostrae timeo parti, quid hic respondeat, Ter. – im Passiv m. folg. Partiz. Fut. Akt., ne timeretur eis velut erepturus civitatem, Liv. epit. 86. – absol., ne time, Plaut.: neuter timet, neuter timetur, Plin. ep.: liberalius, quam timebamus, Cic.: et timere et admirari (nos) fingimus, Quint.: eo deceptum, quod neque commissum a se intellegeret, quare timeret, neque sine causa timendum putaret, Caes.: tantum sit causa timendi, Ov.: alqm subit timendi pudor, Plin. ep.: do pignora certa timendo (durch meine Besorgnis), Ov. – m. Dat. für wen? sibi, Caes.: comiti, Verg. u. Ov.: eius vitae, Ter.: libertati, Sall.: unpers., urbi timetur, Lucan. – m. pro u. Abl., timuere dei pro vindice terrae, Ov.: qui pro illo nimium timet, Sen.: pro eo timebam, Curt.: timens pro capite amicissimo, Plin. ep.: pro Aristippi anima, Augustin. – m. folg. de (wegen, in Ansehung) u. Abl., de re publica valde timeo, Cic.: unpers., cum de salute regis timeretur, Curt. – m. folg. ab (von seiten) u. Abl., a quo quidem genere ego numquam timui, Cic.: cum timemus fraudem a proximis, insidias a servis, Sen. – m. Abl. womit? timuit exterrita pennis ales, gab seine Furcht mit den Flügeln (durch Flattern) zu erkennen, Verg. Aen. 5, 505. – II) prägn., jmd. zu fürchten haben = es mit jmd. aufnehmen-, mit jmd. kämpfen müssen, non omnia monstra tim., Sen. apoc. 5, 3 (wo das handschr. timuerit herzustellen ist): monstra saeva aut feras, Sen. Herc. fur. 455 (458): feras, Sen. Herc. Oet. 270 (272): pro telis gerit quae timuit et quae fudit, Sen. Herc. fur. 40 (44) sq.: et uterque timuit, Sen. Herc. fur. 793 (797). – / PAdi. timēns u. timendus s. bes.

    lateinisch-deutsches > timeo

  • 20 ne

    1. nē (nicht nae), Adv. (νή), ja, nur bei einem Pronomen u. in der mustergültigen Prosa in der Regel mit vorausgegangenem od. nachfolgendem, angedeutetem od. bestimmt ausgesprochenem Konditionalsatze, a) absol.: ne ego homo infelix fui, qui non alas intervelli, Plaut.: ne ego fortunatus homo sum, Ter.: ne ego, inquam, si ita est, velim eum tibi placere quam maxime, Cic.: ne illi multa saecula exspectanda fuerunt! Cic.: ne tu perditas res Campanorum narras, ubi summus honor ad filium meum perveniet, Liv. – b) verb. mit hercle, edepol, ecastor, medius fidius, ja fürwahr, ja bei Gott, ja in der Tat, ne tu hercle cum magno malo (tuo) mi obviam occessisti, Plaut.: ne illam ecastor fenerato mi abstulisti, Plaut.: medius fidius ne tu emisti ludum praeclarum, Cic.: – Über die allein richtige Schreibung ne s. Ritschl Plaut. tom. 1. prolegom. p. XCVII. Georges Lexik. der lat. Wortf. S. 447.
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    2. nē, die urspr. u. eig. latein. Verneinungspartikel, als Adv. = nicht, als Coniunction = daß nicht, damit nicht, und, mit Verkürzung des Vokals, , als enklitisches Fragewort = etwa nicht? doch nicht? ob etwa nicht? (s. 3. ne).
    I) , als Adv., nicht, A) als Verneinung eines Begriffes, der als sinnlich od. geistig wahrgenommen aufgefaßt wird. In dieser Weise findet sich ne nur in der älteren Zeit der Sprache gebraucht, während sonst gew. non zur Verneinung dient, nisi tu ne vis, Plaut.: operae ne parcunt, Plaut.: crescere ne possunt fruges, Lucr. – In der ausgebildeten Sprache hat es sich so erhalten in Zusammensetzungen, wie nefas, nemo (= ne-homo), ne-scio, ne-quaquam, nedum, ne- uter, nullus, numquam, nusquam, necopinus, necubi, negotium u.a.
    B) als Verneinung eines Begriffes, der als vorgestellt und daher nur als möglich aufgefaßt wird, 1) in der Verbindung ne... quidem (ne quidem ohne dazwischengesetztes Wort bei Gaius inst. 1, 67 u. 3, 93), die das Wort oder die Wortverbindung, die verneint werden soll, in die Mitte nimmt, nicht einmal, ne populus quidem, Cic.: ne in oppidis quidem, Cic.: ne cum esset factum quidem, Cic. – Sollen mehrere durch Partikeln verbundene Wortbegriffe verneint werden, so steht ne... quidem nur bei dem ersten, ne
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    Aequi quidem ac Volsci, Liv.: ne a sententiis quidem aut verbis, Quint. – Ebenso wird bei verbundenen Sätzen ne... quidem nur im ersten gesetzt, ita ut ne efferendi quidem signa Romanis spatium nec ad explicandam aciem locus esset, Liv. – Durch ne... quidem wird der ganze Satz verneint, cum mendaci homini ne verum quidem dicenti credere soleamus, Cic. – Doch geht sehr häufig eine Negation voraus, non fugio ne hos quidem mores, Cic.: numquam illum ne minimā quidem re offendi, Cic. – Wenn daher zwei Satzglieder miteinander verbunden werden, von denen das eine den schwächeren Gedanken durch non modo (nicht eben, nicht gerade, nicht nur), das andere den stärkeren durch ne... quidem ausdrückt, so kann bei jenem non als seine eigene Negation gesetzt, aber auch weggelassen u. aus dem mit ne... quidem gebildeten Satze entnommen werden, jedoch nur dann, wenn beide Satzglieder einerlei Prädikat haben, mihi vero quidquid accĭderit ne recusanti quidem, non modo non repugnanti, Cic.: ne sues quidem id velint, non modo ipse, nicht bloß ich nicht, Cic.: duas res non modo agere uno tempore, sed ne cogitando quidem explicare potest, Cic. – Häufig bedeutet ne... quidem a) geschweige, viel weniger, wenn der Satz eine Steigerung enthält, nullum est fatum: ita ne divinatio quidem, Cic. – b) keineswegs, wenn ein anderer Satz mit sed (sondern),
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    etiam (sogar), sed etiam (sondern sogar) entgegengesetzt wird, is utitur consilio ne suorum quidem, sed suo, Cic.: ergo illi ne causa quidem itineris, etiam manendi, Cic.: ne conivente quidem te, sed etiam hilarioribus oculis intuente, Cic. – c) natürlich nicht, gewiß nicht, wenn ein abgeleiteter Gedanke angeschlossen wird, carēre enim sentientis est: nec sensus in mortuo: ne carēre quidem igitur in mortuo est, Cic.: egone ut te interpellem? ne hoc quidem vellem, Cic. – 2) in der Verbindung ne... quoque = ne... quidem, auch nicht einmal, sese, inquit, ne id quoque, quod tum suaderet, facturum esse, Cl. Quadr. ann. 1. fr. 17 (bei Gell. 17, 2, 18): ceterum quando ne ea quoque temptata vis proficeret, consilio grassandum, Liv. 10, 14, 13: u. so auch Gell. 1, 2, 5 u. 20, 1, 15: in Verbindungen, wie ne quis, ne qui, ne quando u.a., iustitiae primum munus est, ut ne cui quis noceat, Cic.: ut ne qua scintilla relinquatur, Cic.: ut ne quando amare inciperemus, Cic.
    C) zur Verneinung eines Begriffes, der als gewollt u. übh. als von einer Willenstätigkeit abhängig aufgefaßt wird: AA) in unabhängigen Sätzen: 1) in Sätzen, die eine Bitte, eine Aufforderung, einen Befehl enthalten, nicht, a) neben dem Imperativ, ne crucia te, Ter.: ne nega, verred' es nicht! Ter.: ne time, Plaut.: ne metue, Sen. rhet.: fratrem ne desere, Verg.: ne gravare, Plin. ep.: ne timete, Liv.: ne repugnate ve-
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    stro bono, Sen.: impius ne audeto placare donis iram deorum, Cic. – b) neben dem Konjunktiv (des Präsens od. Perfekts), ne me moneatis, Plaut.: ne forte pudori sit tibi Musa, Hor.: ne tot annorum felicitatem in unius horae dederis discrimen, Liv. – Häufig wird ein mit ne gebildeter Satz ohne Verbindungspartikel nach einer Einräumung gesetzt, sint sane liberales ex sociorum fortunis, misericordes in furibus aerarii, ne illi sanguinem nostrum largiantur, doch unser Blut sollen sie nicht vergeuden, Sall.: tu vero istam Romae legem rogato: nobis nostras ne ademeris, Cic. – Ebenso steht ein mit ne gebildeter Satz ohne Verbindungspartikel, wenn der in ihm enthaltene Gedanke aus einem anderen abgeleitet wird, nec nunc adulteria obiecturum ait, ne domum reposceret, noch weniger wolle er den Palast zurückverlangen, Tac. ann. 11, 30 (wo Halm nedum). – 2) in Sätzen, die eine Einräumung enthalten, gesetzt, daß nicht, zugegeben, daß nicht, ne sit sane summum malum dolor: malum certe est, Cic.: ne sit igitur sol, ne luna, ne stellae, Cic.: ne aequaveritis Hannibali Philippum, ne Carthaginiensibus Macedonas, Pyrrho certe aequabitis, Liv. – 3) in Sätzen, die einen Wunsch enthalten, nicht, doch nicht, ne id Iuppiter optimus maximus sirit, Liv. – bes. häufig utinam ne (wofür auch utinam non stehen kann), illud utinam ne vere scriberem, Cic. – Dah. wird ne auch bei Beteuerungen ge-
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    setzt, ne vivam, si scio, ich will des Todes sein, Cic.: ne sim salvus, si aliter scribo ac sentio, ich will nicht gesund sein, Cic.
    BB) in abhängigen Sätzen: 1) in Sätzen aller Art neben einem Komparativ, nicht, ja nicht, ut hoc nostrum desiderium ne plus sit annuum, Cic.: muneris ergo in singulos dari ne minus dena milia aeris, Liv.: noluit quid statui nisi columellam tribus cubitis ne altiorem, Cic. – 2) in Sätzen zur Angabe der Absicht, nicht, ja nicht, nur nicht, te ulciscar, ut ne impune nos illuseris, Cic.: quid vis nobis dare, ut isti abs te ne auferantur, Cic. – 3) in Sätzen zur Angabe eines beabsichtigten Erfolges, nicht, ja nicht, nur nicht, iubeatis ut in civitate ne sit, Cic.: illud assequi possunt, ut ne dedeceat, Cic.: te obsecro, ut ne credas, Ter. – Auch da, wo der Erfolg ein rein faktischer zu sein scheint, liegt der Begriff der Absichtlichkeit des handelnden od. denkenden Subjekts zugrunde, tantum a vallo eius prima acies aberat, uti ne in eam telum adigi posset, daß es nicht möglich sein sollte, Caes.: ex quo efficitur, non ut voluptas ne sit, sed ut voluptas non sit summum bonum, nicht daß die Sinnenlust gar nicht vorhanden sein soll, sondern daß sie nicht das höchste Gut ist, Cic. – 4) in relativen Absichtssätzen, die mit quo (qui) od. quomodo gebildet sind, nicht, ja nicht, ego id agam, mihi qui ne detur, Ter.: quo ne per vacuum Romano incurreret ho-
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    stis, Hor.: quaeritis maximis sumptibus faciendis quomodo ne tributa conferatis, Rutil. Lup. – 5) in restringierenden Sätzen in den Verbndgg. dum ne, modo ne, dummodo ne, tantum ne, wenn nur nicht, nur nicht, Komik., Cic. u.a.
    II) , als Coniunction, daß nicht, damit nicht, A) in Sätzen zur Angabe der Absicht, daß nicht, damit nicht, gallinae pennis fovent pullos, ne frigore laedantur, Cic.: dolorem saepe perpetiuntur, ne incĭdant in maiorem Cic.: ne vana urbis magnitudo esset, asylum aperit, Liv.: nemo prudens punit, quia peccatum est, sed ne peccetur, Sen. – Häufig bezieht sich ne auf ein die Absicht andeutendes Wort, wie ideo, idcirco, propter hoc u.a., an ideo aliquid scripsit, ne videretur? Cic.: idcirco capite et superciliis semper erat rasis, ne ullum pilum viri boni habere dicatur, Cic. – Zuw. steht ein mit ne gebildeter Satz vor einem anderen, der eine Behauptung od. Erzählung enthält, um die Absicht anzugeben, in der die Mitteilung gemacht wird. Zur Vervollständigung der Gedankenreihe müßte ein Satz wie »so behaupte, erwähne ich, daß« beigefügt sein, der aber im Lat., wie im Deutschen, oft ausgelassen wird, ne tamen ignores, quo sit Romana loco res, Cantaber Agrippae... virtute cecĭdit, Hor.: daher ne multa dicam, ne multa od. multis, kurz, Cic.
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    folges, daß nicht, 1) nach Verben, die eine Willensäußerung bezeichnen, hoc te rogo, ne demittas animum, Cic.: toti exercitui imperavit, ne iniussu concurrerent, Caes.: malo, ne roges, Cic.: Macedonas monebat, ne moverentur, Iustin.: ne quis insepultus esset, rerum natura prospexit, Sen.: ne quam occasionem dimitteret, cogitabat, Caes. – 2) nach Ausdrücken, die eine Aussage enthalten, die eine Willenstätigkeit voraussetzt, quidam ne umquam riderent, consecuti sunt, Sen.: vestra interest, ne imperatorem pessimi faciant, Tac.: aegre retentis militibus est factum, ne proelio contenderetur, Caes.: potestis efficere, ut male moriar: ne moriar, non potestis, Plin. ep.: reliquum est, ne quid stulte, ne quid temere dicam aut faciam, Cic.
    Als Eigentümlichkeit ist zu bemerken: 1) daß ne durch »daß« od. den bloßen Infinitiv wiedergegeben wird: a) nach den Verben »sich hüten (cavēre), verhindern (impedire, resistere), verbieten (interdicere, seltener vetare), sich weigern (recusare)«, weil der negative Begriff, der in diesen Verben enthalten ist, auch auf den abhängigen Satz übertragen wird, s. caveo, impedio, resisto usw. – Zuw. steht auch ne, wenn aus dem Verbum des Hauptsatzes der Begriff eines der angegebenen Verben herausgenommen werden kann, Decii corpus ne inveniretur, nox quaerentes oppressit, Liv. – b) nach allen Verben u. Aus-
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    drücken, die den Begriff der Furcht u. Besorgnis haben (wie timere, metuere, vereri, horrere, pavere; terrere, conterrere; timor est, metus est, spes est, periculum est), weil in ihnen der Begriff eines vergeblichen Wunsches enthalten ist, s. timeo, metuo usw. – Wenn der abhängige Satz negativ ist, steht ne non, zB. timeo, ne non impetrem, Cic.: vereor, ne sufficere non possim, Curt.: non vereor, ne non scribendo te expleam, Cic.: non est periculum, ne idem facere non possit, Cic. – 2) daß ne nach den Verben »sehen, zusehen, untersuchen, erwägen« häufig statt durch daß nicht auch durch ob etwa übersetzt werden kann, cum circumspiceret, ne quid praeteriisset, Varro: singuli pulli tentandi, ne quid habeant in gutture, Colum.: videamus, ne beata vita effici possit, Cic.: qui, ne quod telum occultaretur, exquirerent, Cic.: ähnlich per aliquot dies ea consultatio tenuit, ne non reddita (bona Tarquinii) belli causa, reddita belli materia essent, es dauerte die Erwägung, ob die unterlassene Zurückgabe den Krieg veranlasse, Liv. – Dah. auch ne non = ob etwa nicht, credere omnia, vide, ne non sit necesse, Cic.: cogitandum sit, ne tutior non sit, Cic. – 3) daß ne durch geschweige daß wiedergegeben wird, wenn aus einer weitergreifenden Behauptung der Schluß gezogen werden soll, daß eine eingeschränktere nach dem Vorausgegangenen unzulässig erscheine, zB. vix incedo inanis, ne
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    ire posse cum onere existumes, Plaut. Amph. 330: me vero nihil istorum ne iuvenem quidem movit umquam, ne nunc senem (sc. moveret), Cic. ep. 9, 26, 2: u. so Ter. Andr. 706. Cic. Planc. 27 u. Verr. 4, 52. Sall. Cat. 11, 8. Liv. 3, 52, 9. Tac. ann. 11, 30 N.
    ————————
    3. ne, als enklitisches Fragewort, wird dem Worte angehängt, das in der Frage hervorgehoben werden muß, weshalb dieses auch meist zu Anfang des Satzes gestellt wird. Häufig verliert es durch Apokope seinen Vokal, wobei noch die Veränderung eintreten kann, daß ein davorstehendes s ausfällt und, wenn die Silbe lang war, diese dann verkürzt wird, zB. iussĭn, adeŏn, vĭn (vīsne), satĭn (satīsne), vidĕn (vidēsne), iubĕn (iubēsne). Es steht:
    I) in einfachen Fragen, 1) in direkten, a) wenn eine verneinende Antwort erwartet wird, doch nicht, censen posse me affirmare? du glaubst doch nicht? Ter.: quidquamne bonum est, quod non eum, qui id possidet, meliorem facit, Cic. – daher in einer Frage, die mit erregtem Gefühl, mit Verwunderung, mit Unwillen, mit Ironie ausgesprochen wird, Apollinemne tu Delium spoliare ausus es? Cic.: vin tu homines urbemque feris praeponere silvis? Hor. – b) wenn eine bejahende Antwort erwartet wird, nicht, etwa nicht, mitto alios: etiamne nobis expedit? nützt es uns nicht etwa auch? Cic.: numquid est aliud? rectene interpretor sententiam tuam? Cic.: vitae censetisne habendam mihi aliquam esse rationem, Cic.: videtisne ut apud Homerum saepissime Nestor de virtutibus suis praedicet? Cic. – in einer Frage, die mit Verwunderung, Unwillen od. Ironie ausgesprochen wird, vin tu te
    ————
    cohibere, willst du dich nicht fassen? Auct. b. Cic. – c) in besonderen Wendungen, wie egone? doch ich nicht? ich sollte nicht? Cic.: itane? itane vero? demnach doch nicht? demnach doch wahrlich nicht? sollte demnach nicht? sollte demnach wirklich nicht? Cic. – bes. häufig dem relativen Pronomen od. anderen relativen Wörtern angehängt, wo es den im relativen Worte liegenden Begriff nachdrücklich hervorhebt, quine putatis difficile et mirum, quod contigit? ihr glaubt doch nicht, daß es etwas Schwieriges u. Wunderbares sei? Hor.: quiane auxilio iuvat ante levatos? doch nicht, weil die früher Geretteten dessen sich erfreuen? Verg.: quamne in manibus tenui atque accepi cistellam? habe ich nicht etwa jenes Kästchen in den Händen gehabt? Plaut.: quaene ambae obsecraverint? haben sie mich nicht dringend gebeten? Plaut. – daher in Fragen, die eine Verwunderung enthalten, quae dudum fassa est mihi, quaene infitias eat? will sie nicht leugnen, was sie mir schon längst gestanden hat? Plaut.: quantane? wie groß müßte sie nicht sein? Hor. – d) in Verbindung mit dem zum Ausruf gebrauchten ut, wie: victamne ut quisquam victrici patriae praeferret? wie sollte nicht usw., Liv.: nemone ut avarus se probet? Hor. – 2) in indirekten Fragen, ob etwa nicht, wofür wir meist, bei gänzlicher Unentschiedenheit der zu erwartenden Antwort, bloß ob oder ob etwa, ob viel-
    ————
    leicht gebrauchen, ut videamus, satisne ista sit defectio, Cic.: hunc sum rogaturus, navem populo Romano debeantne, Cic.: frumentum ab his sumpseritne, Cic.: haec omnia sciasne esse notata? Cic.
    II) in mehrfachen Fragen, wo wir in der deutschen Übersetzung den Begriff der Negation gänzlich fallen lassen müssen, 1) in direkten Fragen, a) dem ersten Gliede beigegeben, sed isne est, quem quaero, annon? es ist doch wohl der, den ich suche, oder nicht? Ter.: satisne ergo pudori consulat, si quis sine teste libidini pareat, an est aliquid per se ipsum flagitiosum? würde wohl der dem Schamgefühle gemäß handeln, der usw., Cic. – b) dem zweiten Gliede beigegeben in der Verbindung anne, s. an. – 2) in indirekten, a) wiederholt, ob... ob, ob... oder, monstrumne deusne ille sit ignorans, Ov.: quid refert clamne palamne roget, Tibull.: incertus, geniumne loci famulumne parentis esse putet, Verg.: collectosne bibant imbres puteosne perennes iugis aquae (scribere te nobis par est), Hor.: versans (überlegend), Siculisne resideret arvis Italasne capesseret oras, Verg.: neque interesse, ipsosne interficiant impedimentisne exuant, Caes. b. G. 7, 14, 8. – Wenn das erste Glied mit größerer Sicherheit als das zweite ausgesprochen werden soll, bleibt ne im ersten weg, Etrusci diem primum consultando, maturarent traherentne bellum, traduxerunt, in der Überlegung, ob sie den
    ————
    Krieg beschleunigen, ob vielleicht auch verzögern sollten, Liv. – b) dem ersten Gliede beigegeben, intererit multum, divusne loquatur an heros, Hor.: nescio, gratulerne tibi an timeam, Cic. – auch in Verbindung mit utrum, zB. utrum praedicemne an taceam, Ter.: utrum illudne non videatur aegre ferendum, an toleranda aegritudo, Cic.: utrumne divitiis homines an sint virtute beati, Hor. – c) dem zweiten Gliede beigegeben in den Verbindungen anne u. necne, w. s.

    Ausführliches Lateinisch-deutsches Handwörterbuch > ne

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