Translation: from spanish

concerns

  • 1 Argel

    m.
    Algiers.
    * * *
    1 Algiers
    * * *
    * * *
    masculino Algiers
    * * *
    Ex. The plot concerns the persecution of a young librarian in the French administration in Algiers in 1928.
    * * *
    masculino Algiers
    * * *

    Ex: The plot concerns the persecution of a young librarian in the French administration in Algiers in 1928.

    * * *
    Algiers
    * * *

    Argel sustantivo masculino
    Algiers
    Argel sustantivo masculino Algiers
    ' Argel' also found in these entries:
    English:
    Algiers
    * * *
    Algiers
    * * *
    m Algiers

    Spanish-English dictionary > Argel

  • 2 a largo plazo

    (adj.) = in the long term, over the long term, long-range, in the long run, long-term, over the long run, over the long haul, long-run, in the far term, far-term
    Ex. For a scheme to be successfull in the long term it is vital that there should be an organisational structure to support the scheme.
    Ex. This project ought to develop over the long term from a system designed to support the exchange of entries in micro-print to a fully automated network for the processing of records.
    Ex. In September 1973, the University of Washington initiated implementation of a formal long-range planing process for the total university system.
    Ex. Ostensibly, the maneuver was accomplished to curb patronage abuses and make it easier to dismiss deadwood employees in the long run.
    Ex. The use of agents is necessary but not ideal, because an agent often represents rival concerns, and aims for a quick turnover rather than long-term profitability.
    Ex. Some feel that these sessions can be 'self-defeating over the long run because they are based on a reward-punishment psychology that serves to intensify the pressure on the individual'.
    Ex. But over the long haul you'll just find that your data is easier and cheaper to get at if you use XML.
    Ex. Findings indicate that the short-run success of methadone programs does not automatically translate into long-run abstinence.
    Ex. In the far term novel techniques are being developed to remove carbon dioxide from fuel gas or flue gas from energy conversion systems.
    Ex. These processes can be viewed as near-term and far-term.
    * * *
    (adj.) = in the long term, over the long term, long-range, in the long run, long-term, over the long run, over the long haul, long-run, in the far term, far-term

    Ex: For a scheme to be successfull in the long term it is vital that there should be an organisational structure to support the scheme.

    Ex: This project ought to develop over the long term from a system designed to support the exchange of entries in micro-print to a fully automated network for the processing of records.
    Ex: In September 1973, the University of Washington initiated implementation of a formal long-range planing process for the total university system.
    Ex: Ostensibly, the maneuver was accomplished to curb patronage abuses and make it easier to dismiss deadwood employees in the long run.
    Ex: The use of agents is necessary but not ideal, because an agent often represents rival concerns, and aims for a quick turnover rather than long-term profitability.
    Ex: Some feel that these sessions can be 'self-defeating over the long run because they are based on a reward-punishment psychology that serves to intensify the pressure on the individual'.
    Ex: But over the long haul you'll just find that your data is easier and cheaper to get at if you use XML.
    Ex: Findings indicate that the short-run success of methadone programs does not automatically translate into long-run abstinence.
    Ex: In the far term novel techniques are being developed to remove carbon dioxide from fuel gas or flue gas from energy conversion systems.
    Ex: These processes can be viewed as near-term and far-term.

    Spanish-English dictionary > a largo plazo

  • 3 aburrido

    adj.
    1 boring, dull, humdrum, uninteresting.
    2 bored, tired.
    f. & m.
    bore, boring person, tiresome person.
    past part.
    past participle of spanish verb: aburrir.
    * * *
    1→ link=aburrir aburrir
    1 (ser aburrido) boring, tedious; (monótono) dull, dreary
    2 (estar aburrido) bored, weary; (cansado) tired of; (harto) fed up with
    * * *
    (f. - aburrida)
    adj.
    1) boring, tedious
    2) bored, fed up
    * * *
    ADJ (=que aburre) boring, tedious; (=que siente aburrimiento) bored

    ¡estoy aburrido de decírtelo! — I'm tired of telling you!

    ABURRIDO ¿"Bored" o "boring"? Usamos bored para referirnos al hecho de {estar} aburrido, es decir, de sentir aburrimiento: Si estás aburrida podrías ayudarme con este trabajo If you're bored you could help me with this work ► Usamos boring con personas, actividades y cosas para indicar que alguien o algo {es} aburrido, es decir, que produce aburrimiento: ¡Qué novela más aburrida! What a boring novel! No me gusta salir con él; es muy aburrido I don't like going out with him; he's very boring
    * * *
    I
    - da adjetivo
    1) < persona>
    a) [estar] ( sin entretenimiento) bored
    b) [estar] ( harto) fed up

    aburrido de algo — tired of something, fed up with something

    aburrido de + inf — tired of -ing

    2) [ser] <película/persona> boring; < trabajo> boring, tedious
    II
    - da masculino, femenino bore
    * * *
    = tedious, deadly [deadlier -comp., deadliest -sup.], drab, stodgy, unexciting, uninteresting, wearisome, weary [wearier -comp., weariest -sup.], bored, boring, wearying, dreary [drearier -comp., dreariest -sup.], uninspiring, unmoving, dull, cut and dried [cut and dry].
    Ex. In other places too many references could make for a very tedious search.
    Ex. Some authors, of course, object to their work being subjected to compulsory dissection for exams in the traditional deadly manner and like Bernard Shaw, they swear to haunt anyone who so mistreats them (Shaw's ghost must be busy these days).
    Ex. Have reading foisted on you as a duty, a task to be put up with, from which you expect no delight, and it can appear a drab business gladly to be given up.
    Ex. One could easily prefer the convenience of the stodgy single-volume work.
    Ex. The author argues that the advantages for higher education are unclear, and rather unexciting.
    Ex. There is no such thing on earth as an uninteresting subject; the only thing that can exist is an uninterested person.
    Ex. The earliest binding machines replaced the wearisome hand-beating of the sheets in order to fold them.
    Ex. Humanity is returning to the downsized, reengineered, total quality management weary business world.
    Ex. One should answer the telephone clearly and pleasantly -- not in a bored voice or in slurred haste.
    Ex. This article shows how the dowdy and boring image of the stereotypical librarian as presented in fiction, taints the portrayal of all who work in libraries.
    Ex. A new wave of books dealing frankly with such concerns as sex, alcoholism and broken homes was seen as a breakthrough, but plots and styles have begun to show a wearying sameness.
    Ex. The city was considered to be seedy (decayed, littered, grimy, and dreary), crowded, busy, and strongly idiosyncratic (quaint, historic, colorful, and full of 'atmosphere').
    Ex. Though the novel begins like a house ablaze, it later thickens slightly into an acceptable if uninspiring finale.
    Ex. The outcome is strangely unmoving.
    Ex. These librarians are given Haykin upon the day of their arrival and are expected to read the entire dull document and use it as a guideline in establishing subject headings.
    Ex. I don't like to hear cut-and-dried sermons -- when I hear a man preach, I like to see him act as if he were fighting bees.
    ----
    * de un modo aburrido y pesado = tediously, ponderously, boringly.
    * día aburrido = dull day.
    * estar aburrido como una ostra = be bored stiff.
    * * *
    I
    - da adjetivo
    1) < persona>
    a) [estar] ( sin entretenimiento) bored
    b) [estar] ( harto) fed up

    aburrido de algo — tired of something, fed up with something

    aburrido de + inf — tired of -ing

    2) [ser] <película/persona> boring; < trabajo> boring, tedious
    II
    - da masculino, femenino bore
    * * *
    = tedious, deadly [deadlier -comp., deadliest -sup.], drab, stodgy, unexciting, uninteresting, wearisome, weary [wearier -comp., weariest -sup.], bored, boring, wearying, dreary [drearier -comp., dreariest -sup.], uninspiring, unmoving, dull, cut and dried [cut and dry].

    Ex: In other places too many references could make for a very tedious search.

    Ex: Some authors, of course, object to their work being subjected to compulsory dissection for exams in the traditional deadly manner and like Bernard Shaw, they swear to haunt anyone who so mistreats them (Shaw's ghost must be busy these days).
    Ex: Have reading foisted on you as a duty, a task to be put up with, from which you expect no delight, and it can appear a drab business gladly to be given up.
    Ex: One could easily prefer the convenience of the stodgy single-volume work.
    Ex: The author argues that the advantages for higher education are unclear, and rather unexciting.
    Ex: There is no such thing on earth as an uninteresting subject; the only thing that can exist is an uninterested person.
    Ex: The earliest binding machines replaced the wearisome hand-beating of the sheets in order to fold them.
    Ex: Humanity is returning to the downsized, reengineered, total quality management weary business world.
    Ex: One should answer the telephone clearly and pleasantly -- not in a bored voice or in slurred haste.
    Ex: This article shows how the dowdy and boring image of the stereotypical librarian as presented in fiction, taints the portrayal of all who work in libraries.
    Ex: A new wave of books dealing frankly with such concerns as sex, alcoholism and broken homes was seen as a breakthrough, but plots and styles have begun to show a wearying sameness.
    Ex: The city was considered to be seedy (decayed, littered, grimy, and dreary), crowded, busy, and strongly idiosyncratic (quaint, historic, colorful, and full of 'atmosphere').
    Ex: Though the novel begins like a house ablaze, it later thickens slightly into an acceptable if uninspiring finale.
    Ex: The outcome is strangely unmoving.
    Ex: These librarians are given Haykin upon the day of their arrival and are expected to read the entire dull document and use it as a guideline in establishing subject headings.
    Ex: I don't like to hear cut-and-dried sermons -- when I hear a man preach, I like to see him act as if he were fighting bees.
    * de un modo aburrido y pesado = tediously, ponderously, boringly.
    * día aburrido = dull day.
    * estar aburrido como una ostra = be bored stiff.

    * * *
    aburrido1 -da
    A ‹persona›
    1 [ ESTAR] (sin entretenimiento) bored
    estoy muy aburrido I'm bored stiff
    2 [ ESTAR] (harto) fed up
    me tienes aburrido con tus quejas I'm fed up with your complaints
    aburrido DE algo tired OF sth, fed up WITH sth
    estoy aburrido de sus bromas I'm tired of o fed up with her jokes
    aburrido DE + INF tired of -ING
    estoy aburrido de pedírselo I'm tired of asking him for it
    B [ SER] ‹película/persona› boring
    es un trabajo muy aburrido it's a really boring o tedious job
    la conferencia fue aburridísima the lecture was really boring
    aburrido2 -da
    masculine, feminine
    bore
    * * *

     

    Del verbo aburrir: ( conjugate aburrir)

    aburrido es:

    el participio

    Multiple Entries:
    aburrido    
    aburrir
    aburrido
    ◊ -da adjetivo

    1 [estar] ‹ persona


    b) ( harto) fed up;

    aburrido de algo tired of sth, fed up with sth;
    aburrido de hacer algo tired of doing sth
    2 [ser] ‹película/persona boring;
    trabajo boring, tedious
    ■ sustantivo masculino, femenino
    bore
    aburrir ( conjugate aburrir) verbo transitivo
    to bore
    aburrirse verbo pronominal

    b) ( hartarse) aburridose de algo/algn to get tired of o fed up with sth/sb;

    aburridose de hacer algo to get tired of doing sth
    aburrido,-a adjetivo
    1 (cargante, tedioso) tu hermano es aburrido, your brother's boring
    2 (que no se divierte) tu hermano está aburrido, your brother's bored
    (cansado, hastiado) estoy aburrido de tus quejas, I'm tired of your complaints
    aburrir verbo transitivo to bore
    ♦ Locuciones: aburrir a las ovejas, to be incredibly boring
    ' aburrido' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    aburrida
    - acto
    - amargada
    - amargado
    - harta
    - harto
    - insípida
    - insípido
    - ladrillo
    - pesada
    - pesado
    - petardo
    - plomo
    - sopa
    - tostón
    - aburridor
    - aguado
    - bastante
    - cansado
    - de
    - enojoso
    - latoso
    - mamado
    - podrido
    English:
    bored
    - boring
    - dreary
    - dull
    - grind
    - plough through
    - quiet
    - shade
    - stiff
    - tedious
    - tediously
    - uninspiring
    - especially
    - staid
    - wade
    * * *
    aburrido, -a
    adj
    1. [harto, fastidiado] bored;
    estar aburrido de hacer algo to be fed up with doing sth;
    estoy aburrido de esperar I'm fed up with o tired of waiting;
    me tiene muy aburrido con sus constantes protestas I'm fed up with her constant complaining;
    Fam
    2. [que aburre] boring;
    este libro es muy aburrido this book is very boring;
    la fiesta está muy aburrida it's a very boring party
    nm,f
    bore;
    ¡eres un aburrido! you're so boring!
    * * *
    adj que aburre boring; que se aburre bored;
    aburrido de algo bored o fed up fam with sth
    * * *
    aburrido, -da adj
    1) : bored, tired, fed up
    2) tedioso: boring, tedious
    * * *
    aburrido1 adj
    2. (tedioso, pesado) boring
    ¡qué programa más aburrido! what a boring programme!

    Spanish-English dictionary > aburrido

  • 4 abuso de poder

    Ex. The study found high levels of mistrust of the police by the public, including considerable concerns about corruption, abuse of power, & lack of respect for the public.
    * * *

    Ex: The study found high levels of mistrust of the police by the public, including considerable concerns about corruption, abuse of power, & lack of respect for the public.

    Spanish-English dictionary > abuso de poder

  • 5 acaloradamente

    adv.
    1 warmly, with vehemency.
    2 heatedly, enthusiastically, hotly, passionately.
    * * *
    1 warmly
    2 figurado excitedly
    * * *
    ADV heatedly, excitedly
    * * *
    = heatedly, hotly.
    Ex. We talk heatedly about books that lie beyond our present concerns because these allow us to speculate and often present us with puzzles we want to explore.
    Ex. Pope flushed hotly at this disclosure.
    * * *
    = heatedly, hotly.

    Ex: We talk heatedly about books that lie beyond our present concerns because these allow us to speculate and often present us with puzzles we want to explore.

    Ex: Pope flushed hotly at this disclosure.

    * * *
    heatedly
    * * *
    [debatir] heatedly; [defender] passionately, fervently

    Spanish-English dictionary > acaloradamente

  • 6 actuar de contrapeso

    (v.) = counterpoise
    Ex. Sustainable development is seen as a measure to counterpoise economic growth with environmental concerns.
    * * *

    Ex: Sustainable development is seen as a measure to counterpoise economic growth with environmental concerns.

    Spanish-English dictionary > actuar de contrapeso

  • 7 adquirir importancia

    (v.) = assume + importance, attain + importance, come up, take on + added weight, gain + significance, move up + the agenda, gain + importance, gain in + importance
    Ex. A topic such as metal fatigue assumed a new importance in the 1950s as the unexpected cause of at least two major disasters.
    Ex. However, it doesn't take very long before the supporting machine file attains greater importance than the manual catalog.
    Ex. Do you feel that we should stay with our old number-crunching, inefficient system or switch to voice transmission, which seems to be coming up fairly fast?.
    Ex. This basic principle of marketing takes on added weight when applied to US Federal information programmes in the light of their instrumental value = Este principio básico del marketing cobrar importancia cuando se aplica a los programas de información federal americanos a la vista de su valor instrumental.
    Ex. It was not until the 16th century that falconry and stag hunting gained the significance that it retained until 1789.
    Ex. Concerns about trafficking in arms has moved rapidly up the international agenda.
    Ex. The effective use of library resources is critical to the success of international students, a group which is gaining importance in US higher education.
    Ex. Since most of these Muslims are here to stay, the question of their integration is gaining in importance.
    * * *
    (v.) = assume + importance, attain + importance, come up, take on + added weight, gain + significance, move up + the agenda, gain + importance, gain in + importance

    Ex: A topic such as metal fatigue assumed a new importance in the 1950s as the unexpected cause of at least two major disasters.

    Ex: However, it doesn't take very long before the supporting machine file attains greater importance than the manual catalog.
    Ex: Do you feel that we should stay with our old number-crunching, inefficient system or switch to voice transmission, which seems to be coming up fairly fast?.
    Ex: This basic principle of marketing takes on added weight when applied to US Federal information programmes in the light of their instrumental value = Este principio básico del marketing cobrar importancia cuando se aplica a los programas de información federal americanos a la vista de su valor instrumental.
    Ex: It was not until the 16th century that falconry and stag hunting gained the significance that it retained until 1789.
    Ex: Concerns about trafficking in arms has moved rapidly up the international agenda.
    Ex: The effective use of library resources is critical to the success of international students, a group which is gaining importance in US higher education.
    Ex: Since most of these Muslims are here to stay, the question of their integration is gaining in importance.

    Spanish-English dictionary > adquirir importancia

  • 8 afectar

    v.
    1 to affect.
    las medidas afectan a los pensionistas the measures affect pensioners
    La conversación afecta sus ideas The conversation affects his ideas.
    2 to upset, to affect badly.
    le afectó mucho la muerte de su hermano his brother's death hit him hard
    3 to damage.
    a esta madera le afecta mucho la humedad this wood is easily damaged by damp
    4 to affect, to feign.
    afectó enfado he feigned o affected anger
    María afecta interés pero no es así Mary feigns interest but it is not so.
    5 to pretend to.
    El chico afecta saber mucho The boy pretends to know a lot.
    * * *
    1 (aparentar) to affect
    2 (impresionar) to move
    3 (dañar) to damage
    4 (concernir) to concern
    1 (impresionarse) to be affected, be moved
    * * *
    verb
    * * *
    1. VT
    1) (=repercutir sobre) to affect
    2) (=entristecer) to sadden; (=conmover) to move
    3) frm (=fingir) to affect, feign

    afectar ignoranciato affect o feign ignorance

    4) (Jur) to tie up, encumber
    5) LAm [+ forma] to take, assume
    6) LAm (=destinar) to allocate
    2.
    See:
    * * *
    verbo transitivo
    1)
    a) ( tener efecto en) to affect
    b) ( afligir) to affect (frml)
    2) ( fingir) <admiración/indiferencia> to affect, feign
    * * *
    = affect, colour [color, -USA], cut into, disturb, hit, impair, mar, plague, take + Posesivo + toll (on), beset (with/by), concern, afflict, disrupt, bias, prejudice, cross over, bedevil, dog, dent, make + a dent in, ail, strike, spill over into, take + a toll on, hobble, cast + an impact.
    Ex. Errors such as indexers assigning unsuitable terms to concepts, or relationships being omitted, will affect precision.
    Ex. Lastly, the style, length and contents of an abstract should and will be coloured by the resources of the abstracting agency.
    Ex. The paperback has cut sharply into fiction circulation, and Ennis is right in questioning this type of library.
    Ex. Transcribe the data as found, however, if case endings are affected, if the grammatical construction of the data would be disturbed, or if one element is inseparably linked to another.
    Ex. Flooding, fire, earthquake, collapsed buildings and landslides are the most frequent kinds of disasters to hit libraries: nearly all will lead to wet books.
    Ex. It is difficult to neglect either entirely, without impairing the effectiveness in fulfilling the other objective.
    Ex. Unfortunately, much of Metcalfe's writing is marred by what appears to be a deep-rooted prejudice against the classified approach, particularly as exemplified by Ranganathan.
    Ex. Title indexes have always been plagued by the absence of terminology control.
    Ex. The pressures which modern society puts on all its members are great and those pressures take their toll.
    Ex. Since 1963 they have produced their own bibliographic listings with various degrees of efficiency and comprehensiveness but usually with the same depressing tardiness in recording new publications which has so beset the UNDEX listings.
    Ex. The first issue concerns the consistent description of subjects.
    Ex. There will also be those who have in fact decided what information they need but are afflicted by the paralysis of 'unverbalised thought'.
    Ex. Essentially, problem patrons can be considered in three groups: (1) the dangerous or apparently dangerous; (2) the patron who disrupts readers; and (3) the nuisance whose focus is the librarian.
    Ex. A sample would be biased if some elements in the population have no chance of selection.
    Ex. The very requirements for success in one area may prejudice success in another.
    Ex. Conversely, indirect costs are those factors that are difficult to assign to individual products because they cross over several products.
    Ex. The article has the title 'Piracy, crooked printers, inflation bedevil Russian publishing'.
    Ex. The title of the article is 'Sweeping away the problems that dog the industry?'.
    Ex. Perhaps by the year 2010 newspaper circulations might be seriously dented by online services.
    Ex. Office automation products and techniques will be able to make a sizeable dent in the growing number of office workers.
    Ex. The federal government has been once again defined as something broken and part of the problem ailing America.
    Ex. The collections of the National Library of the Czech Republic have suffered from the floods that recently struck a large part of the country.
    Ex. The artificiality of institutional concepts has spilled over into the structure of the publishing services on which the user depends for Community information.
    Ex. Agoraphobia can take a toll on sufferers' families as well as the sufferers themselves, as some agoraphobics may become housebound or cling to certain people for safety.
    Ex. With Florida's no-fault auto insurance law set to expire in October, there are fears that that medical services could be hobbled.
    Ex. An interest-rate increase is a weapon to fight inflation which will cast an impact on all industries.
    ----
    * afectar a = cut across, have + impact (on), have + effect on, have + implication for, impinge on/upon, operate on, carry over to.
    * afectar a la eficacia de Algo = prejudice + effectiveness.
    * afectar al mundo = span + the globe.
    * afectar a todo = run through.
    * afectar a todo el país = sweep + the country.
    * afectar a una decisión = colour + decision, affect + decision.
    * afectar completamente = engulf.
    * afectar directamente = cut to + the quick.
    * afectar directamente a = cut to + the heart of.
    * afectar fuertemente = hit + hard.
    * afectar mucho = hit + hard.
    * dificultad + afectar = difficulty + dog.
    * no afectar = be immune against, leave + unaffected.
    * no ser afectado = leave + unaffected.
    * problema + afectar = problem + afflict, problem + plague.
    * problemática que afecta a = issues + surrounding.
    * que afecta a = surrounding.
    * que afecta a toda la sociedad = culture-wide.
    * que afecta a todas las culturas = culture-wide.
    * que afecta a varias edades = cross-age [cross age].
    * que afecta a varias generaciones = cross-generational.
    * ser afectado por = have + a high stake in.
    * sin ser afectado = untouched.
    * verse muy afectado por = have + a high stake in.
    * * *
    verbo transitivo
    1)
    a) ( tener efecto en) to affect
    b) ( afligir) to affect (frml)
    2) ( fingir) <admiración/indiferencia> to affect, feign
    * * *
    = affect, colour [color, -USA], cut into, disturb, hit, impair, mar, plague, take + Posesivo + toll (on), beset (with/by), concern, afflict, disrupt, bias, prejudice, cross over, bedevil, dog, dent, make + a dent in, ail, strike, spill over into, take + a toll on, hobble, cast + an impact.

    Ex: Errors such as indexers assigning unsuitable terms to concepts, or relationships being omitted, will affect precision.

    Ex: Lastly, the style, length and contents of an abstract should and will be coloured by the resources of the abstracting agency.
    Ex: The paperback has cut sharply into fiction circulation, and Ennis is right in questioning this type of library.
    Ex: Transcribe the data as found, however, if case endings are affected, if the grammatical construction of the data would be disturbed, or if one element is inseparably linked to another.
    Ex: Flooding, fire, earthquake, collapsed buildings and landslides are the most frequent kinds of disasters to hit libraries: nearly all will lead to wet books.
    Ex: It is difficult to neglect either entirely, without impairing the effectiveness in fulfilling the other objective.
    Ex: Unfortunately, much of Metcalfe's writing is marred by what appears to be a deep-rooted prejudice against the classified approach, particularly as exemplified by Ranganathan.
    Ex: Title indexes have always been plagued by the absence of terminology control.
    Ex: The pressures which modern society puts on all its members are great and those pressures take their toll.
    Ex: Since 1963 they have produced their own bibliographic listings with various degrees of efficiency and comprehensiveness but usually with the same depressing tardiness in recording new publications which has so beset the UNDEX listings.
    Ex: The first issue concerns the consistent description of subjects.
    Ex: There will also be those who have in fact decided what information they need but are afflicted by the paralysis of 'unverbalised thought'.
    Ex: Essentially, problem patrons can be considered in three groups: (1) the dangerous or apparently dangerous; (2) the patron who disrupts readers; and (3) the nuisance whose focus is the librarian.
    Ex: A sample would be biased if some elements in the population have no chance of selection.
    Ex: The very requirements for success in one area may prejudice success in another.
    Ex: Conversely, indirect costs are those factors that are difficult to assign to individual products because they cross over several products.
    Ex: The article has the title 'Piracy, crooked printers, inflation bedevil Russian publishing'.
    Ex: The title of the article is 'Sweeping away the problems that dog the industry?'.
    Ex: Perhaps by the year 2010 newspaper circulations might be seriously dented by online services.
    Ex: Office automation products and techniques will be able to make a sizeable dent in the growing number of office workers.
    Ex: The federal government has been once again defined as something broken and part of the problem ailing America.
    Ex: The collections of the National Library of the Czech Republic have suffered from the floods that recently struck a large part of the country.
    Ex: The artificiality of institutional concepts has spilled over into the structure of the publishing services on which the user depends for Community information.
    Ex: Agoraphobia can take a toll on sufferers' families as well as the sufferers themselves, as some agoraphobics may become housebound or cling to certain people for safety.
    Ex: With Florida's no-fault auto insurance law set to expire in October, there are fears that that medical services could be hobbled.
    Ex: An interest-rate increase is a weapon to fight inflation which will cast an impact on all industries.
    * afectar a = cut across, have + impact (on), have + effect on, have + implication for, impinge on/upon, operate on, carry over to.
    * afectar a la eficacia de Algo = prejudice + effectiveness.
    * afectar al mundo = span + the globe.
    * afectar a todo = run through.
    * afectar a todo el país = sweep + the country.
    * afectar a una decisión = colour + decision, affect + decision.
    * afectar completamente = engulf.
    * afectar directamente = cut to + the quick.
    * afectar directamente a = cut to + the heart of.
    * afectar fuertemente = hit + hard.
    * afectar mucho = hit + hard.
    * dificultad + afectar = difficulty + dog.
    * no afectar = be immune against, leave + unaffected.
    * no ser afectado = leave + unaffected.
    * problema + afectar = problem + afflict, problem + plague.
    * problemática que afecta a = issues + surrounding.
    * que afecta a = surrounding.
    * que afecta a toda la sociedad = culture-wide.
    * que afecta a todas las culturas = culture-wide.
    * que afecta a varias edades = cross-age [cross age].
    * que afecta a varias generaciones = cross-generational.
    * ser afectado por = have + a high stake in.
    * sin ser afectado = untouched.
    * verse muy afectado por = have + a high stake in.

    * * *
    afectar [A1 ]
    vt
    A
    1 (tener efecto en) to affect
    la nueva ley no afecta al pequeño empresario the new law doesn't affect the small businessman
    está afectado de una grave enfermedad pulmonar ( frml); he is suffering from a serious lung disease
    la enfermedad le afectó el cerebro the illness affected her brain
    las zonas afectadas por las inundaciones the areas hit o affected by the floods
    2 (afligir) to affect ( frml)
    lo que dijiste lo afectó mucho what you said upset him terribly
    3 ( Der) ‹bienes› to encumber
    B (fingir) ‹admiración/indiferencia› to affect, feign afectar + INF to pretend to + INF
    * * *

     

    afectar ( conjugate afectar) verbo transitivo
    1


    b) ( afligir) to affect (frml);


    2 ( fingir) ‹admiración/indiferencia to affect, feign
    afectar verbo transitivo
    1 (incumbir) to affect: la medida nos afecta a todos, the measure affects us all
    2 (impresionar, entristecer) to affect, sadden: le afectó mucho la muerte de su padre, she was deeply affected by her father's death
    ' afectar' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    inmune
    - tocar
    - afligir
    - impresionar
    - repercutir
    - sacudir
    English:
    affect
    - damage
    - get
    - hit
    - tell
    - upset
    - dent
    - difference
    - disrupt
    - impair
    - interfere
    - touch
    - whole
    * * *
    1. [incumbir] to affect;
    las medidas afectan a los pensionistas the measures affect pensioners
    2. [afligir] to upset, to affect badly;
    todo lo afecta he's very sensitive;
    lo afectó mucho la muerte de su hermano his brother's death hit him hard
    3. [producir perjuicios en] to damage;
    la sequía que afectó a la región the drought which hit the region;
    a esta madera le afecta mucho la humedad this wood is easily damaged by damp
    4. [simular] to affect, to feign;
    afectó enfado he feigned o affected anger
    5. RP [destinar, asignar] to assign
    * * *
    v/t
    1 ( producir efecto en) affect
    2 ( conmover) upset, affect
    3 ( fingir) feign
    * * *
    1) : to affect
    2) : to upset
    3) : to feign, to pretend
    * * *
    1. to affect
    2. (conmover) to affect / to upset [pt. & pp. upset]

    Spanish-English dictionary > afectar

  • 9 agencia federal

    f.
    federal agency.
    * * *
    Ex. The injection of foreign ownership into the debate over the privatisation of federal agencies has deflected attention from critical domestic concerns of economic efficiency and operational optimisation.
    * * *

    Ex: The injection of foreign ownership into the debate over the privatisation of federal agencies has deflected attention from critical domestic concerns of economic efficiency and operational optimisation.

    Spanish-English dictionary > agencia federal

  • 10 aislar

    v.
    1 to isolate (person).
    El doctor aisló al paciente The doctor isolated the patient.
    El científico aisló al virus The scientist isolated the virus.
    2 to insulate.
    Marcos aisló la casa para el invierno Mark insulated the house for winter.
    3 to cut off (place).
    la nevada aisló la comarca del resto del país the snow cut the area off from the rest of the country
    4 to isolate (virus).
    5 to keep off.
    6 to seclude, to isolate from the world, to sequester.
    * * *
    (stressed í in certain persons of certain tenses)
    Present Indicative
    aíslo, aíslas, aísla, aislamos, aisláis, aíslan.
    Present Subjunctive
    aísle, aísles, aísle, aislemos, aisléis, aíslen.
    Imperative
    aísla (tú), aísle (él/Vd.), aislemos (nos.), aislad (vos.), aíslen (ellos/Vds.).
    * * *
    1. VT
    1) (=dejar solo) to isolate; (=separar) to separate, detach
    2) [+ ciudad, fortaleza] to cut off
    3) (Elec) to insulate
    2.
    See:
    * * *
    1.
    verbo transitivo
    1)
    a) (apartar, separar) < enfermo> to isolate, keep in isolation; < preso> to place... in solitary confinement; < virus> to isolate
    b) ( dejar sin communicación) < lugar> to cut off
    2) (Elec) to insulate
    2.
    aislarse v pron (refl) to cut oneself off
    * * *
    = cut off, isolate, lock out, seclude, quarantine.
    Ex. The question I have regards natural concerns about the computer going down, and the situation that may exist when the library is cut off for an extended period of time from the online catalog.
    Ex. How were such educational practicalities to be isolated and discussed?.
    Ex. This article examines the role of public library trustees who appear to live on the fringes of the library profession, locked out of the decision making mainstream.
    Ex. Can't you seclude yourself and do nothing but work on this topic for the week?.
    Ex. Australia cannot afford to quarantine itself from global trends and needs to compete with other countries for scarce global capital.
    ----
    * aislar de = insulate from.
    * aislarse de = cut + Reflexivo + off from.
    * protección para excluir o aislar = excluder.
    * * *
    1.
    verbo transitivo
    1)
    a) (apartar, separar) < enfermo> to isolate, keep in isolation; < preso> to place... in solitary confinement; < virus> to isolate
    b) ( dejar sin communicación) < lugar> to cut off
    2) (Elec) to insulate
    2.
    aislarse v pron (refl) to cut oneself off
    * * *
    = cut off, isolate, lock out, seclude, quarantine.

    Ex: The question I have regards natural concerns about the computer going down, and the situation that may exist when the library is cut off for an extended period of time from the online catalog.

    Ex: How were such educational practicalities to be isolated and discussed?.
    Ex: This article examines the role of public library trustees who appear to live on the fringes of the library profession, locked out of the decision making mainstream.
    Ex: Can't you seclude yourself and do nothing but work on this topic for the week?.
    Ex: Australia cannot afford to quarantine itself from global trends and needs to compete with other countries for scarce global capital.
    * aislar de = insulate from.
    * aislarse de = cut + Reflexivo + off from.
    * protección para excluir o aislar = excluder.

    * * *
    aislar [ A19 ]
    vt
    A
    1
    (apartar, separar): conviene aislar a los enfermos the patients should be isolated o kept in isolation
    las riadas aislaron el pueblo the village was cut off by the floods
    sus amigos los han aislado their friends have turned their backs on them o have cut themselves off from them
    2 ‹preso› to place … in solitary confinement
    3 ‹virus› to isolate
    B ( Elec) to insulate
    ( refl) to isolate oneself, cut oneself off
    * * *

    aislar ( conjugate aislar) verbo transitivo
    a) (apartar, separar) ‹ enfermo to isolate, keep in isolation;

    presoto place … in solitary confinement;
    virus to isolate

    c) (Elec) to insulate

    aislarse verbo pronominal ( refl) to cut oneself off
    aislar verbo transitivo
    1 to isolate
    2 Téc to insulate
    ' aislar' also found in these entries:
    English:
    cut off
    - insulate
    - isolate
    - ostracize
    - shut off
    - shut out
    - cut
    - screen
    - shut
    * * *
    vt
    1. [persona] to isolate
    2. [del frío, de la electricidad] to insulate;
    [del ruido] to soundproof
    3. [incomunicar] to cut off;
    la nevada aisló la comarca del resto del país the snow cut the area off from the rest of the country
    4. [virus] to isolate
    vi
    estas ventanas aíslan muy bien del frío/ruido these windows are very good at keeping the cold/noise out
    * * *
    v/t
    1 isolate
    2 EL insulate
    * * *
    aislar {5} vt
    1) : to isolate
    2) : to insulate
    * * *
    aislar vb
    1. (separar) to isolate
    2. (incomunicar) to cut off [pt. & pp. cut]

    Spanish-English dictionary > aislar

  • 11 aliciente

    m.
    1 incentive (incentivo).
    2 attraction (atractivo).
    * * *
    1 (incentivo) incentive, inducement
    2 (atractivo) attraction, lure, charm
    * * *
    noun m.
    * * *
    SM (=incentivo) incentive, inducement; (=atractivo) attraction
    * * *
    masculino incentive
    * * *
    Ex. The current concerns about enticement of young and vulnerable people into abusive relationships and damaging behaviours cannot be overlooked.
    * * *
    masculino incentive
    * * *

    Ex: The current concerns about enticement of young and vulnerable people into abusive relationships and damaging behaviours cannot be overlooked.

    * * *
    1 (incentivo) incentive
    los resultados fueron un aliciente para seguir adelante the results gave him/us an incentive to carry on
    no tienen ningún aliciente para estudiar they have no incentive to study
    2 (atracción) attraction
    volver a su pueblo no tiene/no representa ningún aliciente para ella going back to her village holds no attraction for her
    * * *

    aliciente sustantivo masculino
    incentive
    aliciente sustantivo masculino
    1 (atractivo) lure, charm
    2 (incentivo) incentive
    ' aliciente' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    aguijón
    English:
    act
    - incentive
    - inducement
    - lure
    * * *
    1. [incentivo] incentive;
    esto le servirá de aliciente that will act as an incentive to her
    2. [atractivo] attraction;
    con el aliciente adicional de un precio muy competitivo with the added attraction of a very competitive price
    * * *
    m
    1 ( estímulo) incentive
    2 ( atractivo) attraction
    * * *
    1) incentivo: incentive
    2) atracción: attraction

    Spanish-English dictionary > aliciente

  • 12 ampolla1

    1 = blister.
    Ex. Medical concerns examined in section six include first aid kits, drugs, blisters, diarrhea, stings, bites, anaphylaxis, snakebite, and hypothermia.
    ----
    * ampolla de sangre = blood blister.
    * formación de ampollas = blistering.
    * hacer ampollas = blister.
    * levantar ampollas = blister, rile, raise + Posesivo + hackles.
    * salir ampollas = blister.

    Spanish-English dictionary > ampolla1

  • 13 anafilaxia

    f.
    anaphylaxis.
    * * *
    Ex. Medical concerns examined in section six include first aid kits, drugs, blisters, diarrhea, stings, bites, anaphylaxis, snakebite, and hypothermia.
    * * *

    Ex: Medical concerns examined in section six include first aid kits, drugs, blisters, diarrhea, stings, bites, anaphylaxis, snakebite, and hypothermia.

    * * *
    anafilaxia, anafilaxis
    anaphylaxis

    Spanish-English dictionary > anafilaxia

  • 14 anafilaxis

    f. s.&pl.
    anaphylaxis, allergic-like reaction, hypersensitization.
    * * *
    Ex. Medical concerns examined in section six include first aid kits, drugs, blisters, diarrhea, stings, bites, anaphylaxis, snakebite, and hypothermia.
    * * *

    Ex: Medical concerns examined in section six include first aid kits, drugs, blisters, diarrhea, stings, bites, anaphylaxis, snakebite, and hypothermia.

    Spanish-English dictionary > anafilaxis

  • 15 andador

    adj.
    prone of walking.
    m.
    1 good walker, fast walker, quick walker.
    2 baby walker.
    3 Zimmer frame, walker.
    * * *
    1 (aficionado) fond of walking; (rápido) fast-walking
    nombre masculino,nombre femenino
    1 (bueno) good walker; (rápido) fast walker
    1 (para niños) baby-walker; (para viejos) walking frame
    ————————
    1 (para niños) baby-walker; (para viejos) walking frame
    * * *
    noun m.
    2) baby walker, reins
    * * *
    andador, -a
    1. ADJ
    1) (=que anda rápido) fast-walking
    2) (=viajero) fond of travelling, fond of gadding about
    3) Cono Sur [caballo] well-paced, long-striding
    2.
    SM / F walker
    3. SM
    1) [para niños] baby walker; [para enfermos] Zimmer ® frame
    2) pl andadores [de niño] reins
    4.
    SF Méx prostitute, streetwalker, hustler (EEUU) *
    * * *
    1)
    a) ( con ruedas) baby walker
    b) andadores masculino plural ( arnés) baby harness, reins (pl)
    2) ( para ancianos) Zimmer® frame
    * * *
    = walker, baby walker, walking frame, Zimmer frame.
    Ex. With the growing awareness of physical barriers to access, one hopes for a commitment to eliminate unnecessary steps and areas too cramped for walkers and wheelchairs.
    Ex. Some physiotherapists argue that baby walkers delay independent walking, and encourage abnormal gait and posture, and urge toy libraries to exclude them from their provision.
    Ex. Concerns over the safety of traditional walking frames have led scientists to design a robotic version.
    Ex. Zimmer frames are much more stable than traditional walking sticks, but they are bulky to pack in the car.
    * * *
    1)
    a) ( con ruedas) baby walker
    b) andadores masculino plural ( arnés) baby harness, reins (pl)
    2) ( para ancianos) Zimmer® frame
    * * *
    = walker, baby walker, walking frame, Zimmer frame.

    Ex: With the growing awareness of physical barriers to access, one hopes for a commitment to eliminate unnecessary steps and areas too cramped for walkers and wheelchairs.

    Ex: Some physiotherapists argue that baby walkers delay independent walking, and encourage abnormal gait and posture, and urge toy libraries to exclude them from their provision.
    Ex: Concerns over the safety of traditional walking frames have led scientists to design a robotic version.
    Ex: Zimmer frames are much more stable than traditional walking sticks, but they are bulky to pack in the car.

    * * *
    A
    1 (con ruedas) baby walker
    2 andadores mpl (arnés) baby harness, reins (pl)
    B (para ancianos) Zimmer® frame, walking frame ( BrE)
    * * *

    andador sustantivo masculino
    1

    b)

    andadores sustantivo masculino plural ( arnés) baby harness, reins (pl)

    2 ( para ancianos) Zimmer® frame
    ' andador' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    andadera
    English:
    walking frame
    * * *
    andador, -ora
    adj
    fond of walking;
    es muy andador he likes walking
    nm
    1. [tacataca] baby-walker
    2. [para adultos] walking frame, Br Zimmer® (frame), US (adult) walker
    3. Méx [camino] walkway
    * * *
    I adj
    :
    una persona andadora ( que anda mucho) a person who walks a lot; ( que le gusta andar) a person who is fond of walking
    II m para bebé baby walker; para anciano walker, Zimmer®
    * * *
    1) : walker, baby walker
    2) Mex : walkway
    : walker, one who walks

    Spanish-English dictionary > andador

  • 16 anticipar

    v.
    1 to anticipate.
    Ella anticipa el suceso She anticipates the event.
    2 to bring forward.
    3 to pay in advance.
    4 to advance, to anticipate, to give as an advance.
    Ella anticipa dinero She advances money.
    Ella anticipó el fin del proyecto She moved up the end of the project.
    Ella anticipa el suceso She anticipates the event.
    5 to anticipate to, to expect to.
    Ella anticipó jugar en la final She anticipated to play in the finals.
    * * *
    1 to anticipate, advance, bring forward
    2 (dinero) to advance
    1 (llegar antes) to come early
    2 (adelantarse) to beat to it
    * * *
    verb
    * * *
    1. VT
    1) [+ fecha, acontecimiento] to bring forward

    no anticipemos los acontecimientos — let's not cross our bridges before we come to them, let's not get ahead of ourselves

    2) [+ factura etc] to pay in advance; [+ dinero] to advance, lend, loan
    3)

    anticipar algo con placer(=esperar) to look forward to sth

    anticipar las gracias a algn(=adelantar) to thank sb in advance

    4) (=prever) to anticipate, foresee

    anticipar que... — to anticipate that...

    2.
    See:
    * * *
    1.
    verbo transitivo
    a) <viaje/elecciones> to move up (AmE), to bring forward (BrE)
    b) <dinero/sueldo> to advance

    ¿nos podría anticipar de qué se trata? — could you give us an idea of what it is about?

    te puedo anticipar que... — I can tell you that...

    d) ( indicar)
    2.
    anticiparse v pron
    a) verano/lluvias to be o come early

    anticiparse a algo: se anticipó a su tiempo he was ahead of his time; no nos anticipemos a los acontecimientos let's not jump the gun; (+ me/te/le etc) se nos anticiparon — they anticipated us (frml)

    * * *
    = anticipate, look + ahead, bring forward.
    Ex. The information that most modern indexes must organise concerns much more complex subjects than Cutter could have anticipated.
    Ex. The author gives a brief description of the library and information scene in 1974 and looks ahead to what it will be like in 2014.
    Ex. Although the age for receiving old-age pension is 65 years, an individual can decide to bring it forward to a maximum of 5 years.
    ----
    * anticipándose a = in anticipation of.
    * anticipar Algo = the (hand)writing + be + on the wall, see it + coming.
    * anticipar el futuro = anticipate + the future.
    * anticiparse a = quicken to, outguess, second-guess [secondguess], forestall.
    * anticiparse a Alguien = steal + a march on.
    * anticipar un problema = anticipate + problem.
    * * *
    1.
    verbo transitivo
    a) <viaje/elecciones> to move up (AmE), to bring forward (BrE)
    b) <dinero/sueldo> to advance

    ¿nos podría anticipar de qué se trata? — could you give us an idea of what it is about?

    te puedo anticipar que... — I can tell you that...

    d) ( indicar)
    2.
    anticiparse v pron
    a) verano/lluvias to be o come early

    anticiparse a algo: se anticipó a su tiempo he was ahead of his time; no nos anticipemos a los acontecimientos let's not jump the gun; (+ me/te/le etc) se nos anticiparon — they anticipated us (frml)

    * * *
    = anticipate, look + ahead, bring forward.

    Ex: The information that most modern indexes must organise concerns much more complex subjects than Cutter could have anticipated.

    Ex: The author gives a brief description of the library and information scene in 1974 and looks ahead to what it will be like in 2014.
    Ex: Although the age for receiving old-age pension is 65 years, an individual can decide to bring it forward to a maximum of 5 years.
    * anticipándose a = in anticipation of.
    * anticipar Algo = the (hand)writing + be + on the wall, see it + coming.
    * anticipar el futuro = anticipate + the future.
    * anticiparse a = quicken to, outguess, second-guess [secondguess], forestall.
    * anticiparse a Alguien = steal + a march on.
    * anticipar un problema = anticipate + problem.

    * * *
    anticipar [A1 ]
    vt
    1 ‹fecha/viaje/elecciones› to move up ( AmE), to bring forward ( BrE)
    2 ‹dinero/sueldo› to advance
    anticiparon dos meses de alquiler they paid two months' rent in advance
    3 ‹información›
    ¿nos podría anticipar de qué se trata? could you tell us o give us an idea of what it is about?
    te puedo ir anticipando que … I can tell you now that …
    4
    (indicar, hacer prever): esto anticipa un incremento de la población escolar because of this the number of school-age children is expected to rise
    estas nubes anticipan tormenta these clouds are a sign that a storm is coming
    1 «verano/lluvias» to be o come early
    2 (adelantarse) anticiparse A algo:
    el enemigo se había anticipado a nuestros movimientos the enemy had anticipated our movements
    se anticipó a su tiempo he was ahead of his time
    no nos anticipemos a los acontecimientos let's not get ahead of ourselves
    (+ me/te/le etc): te le anticipaste you beat him to it, you got in before him ( colloq)
    se nos anticiparon publicando antes su versión they got in before us o ( frml) they anticipated us by publishing their version first
    * * *

    anticipar ( conjugate anticipar) verbo transitivo
    a)viaje/elecciones to move up (AmE), to bring forward (BrE)

    b)dinero/sueldo to advance;

    ¿nos podría anticipar de qué se trata? could you give us an idea of what it is about?

    anticiparse verbo pronominal
    a) [verano/lluvias] to be o come early



    no nos anticipemos a los acontecimientos let's not jump the gun
    anticipar verbo transitivo
    1 (adelantar un suceso) to bring forward: no anticipemos acontecimientos, we'll cross that bridge when we come to it
    2 (adelantar un pago) to pay in advance
    ' anticipar' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    prever
    English:
    advance
    - expect
    * * *
    vt
    1. [prever] to anticipate;
    él ya había anticipado la crisis económica he had already anticipated the recession
    2. [adelantar] to bring forward;
    el presidente anticipó las elecciones the president brought forward the elections
    3. [pago] to pay in advance;
    me anticiparon dos semanas de sueldo they gave me an advance of two weeks' salary
    4. [información] to tell in advance;
    no te puedo anticipar nada I can't tell you anything just now
    * * *
    v/t
    1 sueldo advance
    2 fecha, viaje move up, Br
    bring forward
    3 información, noticias give a preview of
    * * *
    1) : to anticipate, to forestall, to deal with in advance
    2) : to pay in advance
    * * *
    1. (fecha) to bring forward [pt. & pp. brought]
    2. (dinero) to pay in advance [pt. & pp. paid] / to advance

    Spanish-English dictionary > anticipar

  • 17 anticuado

    adj.
    old-fashioned, archaic, out-of-date, antiquated.
    f. & m.
    old-fashioned person, fuddy-duddy, fuddy, lame.
    past part.
    past participle of spanish verb: anticuar.
    * * *
    1 antiquated, old-fashioned, obsolete, out-of-date
    * * *
    (f. - anticuada)
    adj.
    old-fashioned, outdated
    * * *
    ADJ [maquinaria, infraestructura, tecnología] antiquated; [moda] old-fashioned, out-of-date; [técnica] obsolete
    * * *
    I
    - da adjetivo old-fashioned
    II
    - da masculino, femenino
    * * *
    = antiquated, backwater, out of date [out-of-date], outdated [out-dated], stale, old-fashioned, outworn, musty [mustier -comp., mustiest -sup.], timed, fossilised [fossilized, -USA], passé, atavistic, moth-eaten, mothy [mothier -comp., mothiest -sup.], dowdy [dowdier -comp., dowdiest -sup.], fuddy-duddy, daggy [daggier -comp., daggiest -sup], long in the tooth.
    Ex. Almost without exception these problems occurred in libraries with antiquated or inadequate ventilation without air-conditioning.
    Ex. When he was younger he really turned the library around, from a backwater, two-bit operation to the respected institution it is today.
    Ex. It is for this reason that many special libraries have constructed their own indexing language; they have avoided being tied to a possibly out of date published list.
    Ex. For example, the outdated subject heading 'Female emancipation' could be changed to the newer term 'Women's liberation' with this function.
    Ex. Does the library continue a stale tradition, or does it interpret social change?.
    Ex. One is tempted to say that the enthusiasts for postcoordinate systems, being forced to admit reluctantly that control was necessary, couldn't bear to use the old-fashioned term 'list of subject headings'.
    Ex. This advertisement was part of a publicity campaign which was based on a presentation of Europe so outworn as to be almost meaningless.
    Ex. Only if we continuously redefine our goals in accordance with the developments in our societies will we remain dynamic libraries and not turn into musty institutions.
    Ex. Librarians need to be vociferous about achievements and services offered in order to dispel ideas about the stereotype librarian, timed and out of touch with contemporary society.
    Ex. The article deals with matters of image and status, professional associations, cultural policies, collections, censorship, outdated infrastructure and fossilised mentalities.
    Ex. By conscious or unconscious fixation on this single, already passé, facet of data processing technology we risk totally ignoring the other functions of a catalog.
    Ex. Teaching lost its status when education became secularized as a tool for economic mobility, when concerns for the spiritual became embarrassingly atavistic.
    Ex. He said: 'The outer shell of democracy is, no doubt, intact but it appears to be moth-eaten from inside'.
    Ex. So, he cleaned the bird cage from top to bottom and threw out all the mothy bird seed.
    Ex. This article shows how the dowdy and boring image of the stereotypical librarian as presented in fiction, taints the portrayal of all who work in libraries.
    Ex. According to him, tea as a category has lacked innovation and upgradation in recent years and hence has a very fuddy-duddy image.
    Ex. What wearing daggy clothes is all about for me is feeling relaxed, knowing I can wear them around people I'm comfortable with.
    Ex. Training would be needed for the reception staff, who all said they were a bit long in the tooth for learning how to use a computer.
    ----
    * estar anticuado = dated.
    * estar un poco anticuado = be some years old.
    * quedarse anticuado = date.
    * * *
    I
    - da adjetivo old-fashioned
    II
    - da masculino, femenino
    * * *
    = antiquated, backwater, out of date [out-of-date], outdated [out-dated], stale, old-fashioned, outworn, musty [mustier -comp., mustiest -sup.], timed, fossilised [fossilized, -USA], passé, atavistic, moth-eaten, mothy [mothier -comp., mothiest -sup.], dowdy [dowdier -comp., dowdiest -sup.], fuddy-duddy, daggy [daggier -comp., daggiest -sup], long in the tooth.

    Ex: Almost without exception these problems occurred in libraries with antiquated or inadequate ventilation without air-conditioning.

    Ex: When he was younger he really turned the library around, from a backwater, two-bit operation to the respected institution it is today.
    Ex: It is for this reason that many special libraries have constructed their own indexing language; they have avoided being tied to a possibly out of date published list.
    Ex: For example, the outdated subject heading 'Female emancipation' could be changed to the newer term 'Women's liberation' with this function.
    Ex: Does the library continue a stale tradition, or does it interpret social change?.
    Ex: One is tempted to say that the enthusiasts for postcoordinate systems, being forced to admit reluctantly that control was necessary, couldn't bear to use the old-fashioned term 'list of subject headings'.
    Ex: This advertisement was part of a publicity campaign which was based on a presentation of Europe so outworn as to be almost meaningless.
    Ex: Only if we continuously redefine our goals in accordance with the developments in our societies will we remain dynamic libraries and not turn into musty institutions.
    Ex: Librarians need to be vociferous about achievements and services offered in order to dispel ideas about the stereotype librarian, timed and out of touch with contemporary society.
    Ex: The article deals with matters of image and status, professional associations, cultural policies, collections, censorship, outdated infrastructure and fossilised mentalities.
    Ex: By conscious or unconscious fixation on this single, already passé, facet of data processing technology we risk totally ignoring the other functions of a catalog.
    Ex: Teaching lost its status when education became secularized as a tool for economic mobility, when concerns for the spiritual became embarrassingly atavistic.
    Ex: He said: 'The outer shell of democracy is, no doubt, intact but it appears to be moth-eaten from inside'.
    Ex: So, he cleaned the bird cage from top to bottom and threw out all the mothy bird seed.
    Ex: This article shows how the dowdy and boring image of the stereotypical librarian as presented in fiction, taints the portrayal of all who work in libraries.
    Ex: According to him, tea as a category has lacked innovation and upgradation in recent years and hence has a very fuddy-duddy image.
    Ex: What wearing daggy clothes is all about for me is feeling relaxed, knowing I can wear them around people I'm comfortable with.
    Ex: Training would be needed for the reception staff, who all said they were a bit long in the tooth for learning how to use a computer.
    * estar anticuado = dated.
    * estar un poco anticuado = be some years old.
    * quedarse anticuado = date.

    * * *
    anticuado1 -da
    ‹persona/ideas› old-fashioned, antiquated; ‹ropa› old-fashioned; ‹sistema/aparato› antiquated
    anticuado2 -da
    masculine, feminine
    eres un anticuado you're so old-fashioned
    * * *

    Del verbo anticuarse: ( conjugate anticuarse)

    anticuado es:

    el participio

    anticuado
    ◊ -da adjetivo

    old-fashioned
    ■ sustantivo masculino, femenino: eres un anticuado you're so old-fashioned
    anticuado,-a adjetivo & sustantivo masculino y femenino old-fashioned, antiquated

    ' anticuado' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    anticuada
    - apolillada
    - apolillado
    - antiguo
    - atrasado
    - pasado
    - zanahoria
    English:
    antiquated
    - date
    - fuddy-duddy
    - old
    - old-fashioned
    - outdated
    - outmoded
    - dated
    - out
    - time
    * * *
    anticuado, -a
    adj
    [persona, ropa] old-fashioned;
    esa técnica está anticuada that method is out of date;
    mi módem se ha quedado anticuado my modem is out of date
    nm,f
    old-fashioned person;
    mi madre es una anticuada my mother is very old-fashioned
    * * *
    adj antiquated
    * * *
    anticuado, -da adj
    : antiquated, outdated
    * * *
    anticuado adj old fashioned

    Spanish-English dictionary > anticuado

  • 18 antorcha olímpica, la

    (n.) = Olympic torch, the
    Ex. The rising tension over the Olympic torch relay is heightening concerns whether this summer's Games will be clouded by political rancor.

    Spanish-English dictionary > antorcha olímpica, la

  • 19 ardid

    m.
    1 ruse, trick.
    2 scheme, stratagem, plan, ruse.
    * * *
    1 scheme, trick
    * * *
    SM ruse

    ardides — tricks, wiles

    * * *
    masculino trick, ruse
    * * *
    = gimmick, stunt, ploy, stalking horse, trick, gaff, wheeze.
    Ex. Many outreach efforts foundered because they were primarily public relations gimmicks aimed at changing the public rather than the library.
    Ex. People think that that this is just a stunt to generate more traffic to a lamely performing Web site.
    Ex. They are using such ploys as citing budget cuts as the reason for making government information more expensive.
    Ex. Legalism and pragmatism were the intellectual stalking horses that contributed most to the victory of economic interest over human concerns in this case.
    Ex. But if variable-length keys are not supported by a data base, various tricks are often necessary to provide access to the library data which has inherently variable-length keys.
    Ex. There are magicians that choose not to work with gaffs of any type because they want to take magic in new directions.
    Ex. Last year's profits were more than halved, so the company has come up with a clever wheeze.
    ----
    * ardid electoral = election stunt.
    * ardid político = political stunt.
    * ardid publicitario = publicity stunt, publicity ploy, advertising ploy.
    * * *
    masculino trick, ruse
    * * *
    = gimmick, stunt, ploy, stalking horse, trick, gaff, wheeze.

    Ex: Many outreach efforts foundered because they were primarily public relations gimmicks aimed at changing the public rather than the library.

    Ex: People think that that this is just a stunt to generate more traffic to a lamely performing Web site.
    Ex: They are using such ploys as citing budget cuts as the reason for making government information more expensive.
    Ex: Legalism and pragmatism were the intellectual stalking horses that contributed most to the victory of economic interest over human concerns in this case.
    Ex: But if variable-length keys are not supported by a data base, various tricks are often necessary to provide access to the library data which has inherently variable-length keys.
    Ex: There are magicians that choose not to work with gaffs of any type because they want to take magic in new directions.
    Ex: Last year's profits were more than halved, so the company has come up with a clever wheeze.
    * ardid electoral = election stunt.
    * ardid político = political stunt.
    * ardid publicitario = publicity stunt, publicity ploy, advertising ploy.

    * * *
    trick, ruse
    se valió de ardides femeninos para convencerlo she used her feminine wiles to persuade him
    * * *

    ardid sustantivo masculino
    trick, ruse
    ardid sustantivo masculino scheme, plot
    ' ardid' also found in these entries:
    Spanish:
    juego
    - zancadilla
    - astucia
    - engaño
    - trampa
    - treta
    English:
    device
    - gimmick
    - ruse
    - scheme
    - trick
    - stunt
    * * *
    ardid nm
    ruse, trick
    * * *
    m trick, ruse
    * * *
    ardid nm
    : scheme, ruse

    Spanish-English dictionary > ardid

  • 20 argucia

    f.
    1 sophism.
    2 subterfuge, contrivance, scheme, chicanery.
    * * *
    1 sophism, subtlety
    * * *
    SF sophistry frm, hair-splitting
    * * *
    femenino cunning argument
    * * *
    = trickery, chicanery, scheme, stalking horse, trick, gaff, wheeze.
    Ex. It is sometimes thought that a woman's trickery compensates for her physical weakness.
    Ex. With zeal, perseverance, charm, and even chicanery, they recruited and trained the 1st users.
    Ex. These cuts were a scheme to privatize the cleaning women's jobs, contracting them out to small or big private cleaning firms.
    Ex. Legalism and pragmatism were the intellectual stalking horses that contributed most to the victory of economic interest over human concerns in this case.
    Ex. But if variable-length keys are not supported by a data base, various tricks are often necessary to provide access to the library data which has inherently variable-length keys.
    Ex. There are magicians that choose not to work with gaffs of any type because they want to take magic in new directions.
    Ex. Last year's profits were more than halved, so the company has come up with a clever wheeze.
    * * *
    femenino cunning argument
    * * *
    = trickery, chicanery, scheme, stalking horse, trick, gaff, wheeze.

    Ex: It is sometimes thought that a woman's trickery compensates for her physical weakness.

    Ex: With zeal, perseverance, charm, and even chicanery, they recruited and trained the 1st users.
    Ex: These cuts were a scheme to privatize the cleaning women's jobs, contracting them out to small or big private cleaning firms.
    Ex: Legalism and pragmatism were the intellectual stalking horses that contributed most to the victory of economic interest over human concerns in this case.
    Ex: But if variable-length keys are not supported by a data base, various tricks are often necessary to provide access to the library data which has inherently variable-length keys.
    Ex: There are magicians that choose not to work with gaffs of any type because they want to take magic in new directions.
    Ex: Last year's profits were more than halved, so the company has come up with a clever wheeze.

    * * *
    cunning argument
    gracias a las argucias de su abogado thanks to some cunning arguments from o some fancy footwork by his lawyer
    * * *

    argucia sustantivo femenino ruse
    * * *
    deceptive argument
    * * *
    f clever argument
    * * *
    : sophistry, subtlety

    Spanish-English dictionary > argucia

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