Translation: from latin

college of magistrates in provincial towns

  • 1 sex primi

    sexprīmi (also separately, sex prī-mi; cf. decem primi, under decem), ōrum, m. [sex-primus], a board or college of magistrates in provincial towns, consisting of six members, Cic. N. D. 3, 30, 74; Inscr. Orell. 3756.—In sing., a member of such a board, Inscr. Orell. 3242.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > sex primi

  • 2 sexprimi

    sexprīmi (also separately, sex prī-mi; cf. decem primi, under decem), ōrum, m. [sex-primus], a board or college of magistrates in provincial towns, consisting of six members, Cic. N. D. 3, 30, 74; Inscr. Orell. 3756.—In sing., a member of such a board, Inscr. Orell. 3242.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > sexprimi

  • 3 decem virī or decemvirī (xvirī)

       decem virī or decemvirī (xvirī) ūm or (in L.) ōrum, m    I. Plur, a commission of ten men, college of ten magistrates, decemviri, decemvirs.—    1. The composers of the Twelve Tables (chosen B.C. 451): ut xviri maximā potestate sine provocatione crearentur.—    2. A tribunal for deciding causes involving liberty or citizenship, called decem viri stlitibus iudicandis.—    3. A commission for distributing public lands: legibus agrariis curatores constituti sunt... xviri: decemviros agro Samniti creare, L.—    4. A college of priests in charge of the Sibylline books: decemviri sacrorum, L.: sacris faciundis, L.—    II. Sing: decemvir or xvir, a member of a decemviral college: ut is xvir sit: Iulius decemvir, L.

    Latin-English dictionary > decem virī or decemvirī (xvirī)

  • 4 parochus

        parochus ī, m, πάροχοσ, a purveyor, provincial officer, required to entertain travelling magistrates, C., H.—An entertainer, host, H.
    * * *
    commissary; (person responsible to supply travelling officials w/shelter/food)

    Latin-English dictionary > parochus

  • 5 aedilis

    aedīlis, is, m. (abl. aedili, Tac. A. 12, 64; Serv. ad Verg. A. 7, 4; Dig. 18, 6, 13;

    but aedile is more usual,

    Charis. p. 96 P.; Varr. 1, 22; Cic. Sest. 44, 95; Liv. 3, 31; Plin. 7, 48, 49, § 158; Inscr. Orell. 3787, 8; cf. Schneid. Gr. II. p. 221; Koffm. s. v.) [aedes], an œdile, a magistrate in Rome who had the superintendence of public buildings and works, such as temples, theatres, baths, aqueducts, sewers, highways, etc.; also of private buildings, of markets, provisions, taverns, of weights and measures (to see that they were legal), of the expense of funerals, and other similar functions of police. The class. passages applying here are: Plaut. Rud. 2, 3, 42; Varr. L. L. 5, § 81 Müll.; Cic. Leg. 3, 3; id. Verr. 2, 5, 14; id. Phil. 9, 7; Liv. 10, 23; Tac. A. 2, 85; Juv. 3, 162; 10, 101; Fest. s. h. v. p. 12; cf. Manut. ad Cic. Fam. 8, 3 and 6.—Further, the aediles, esp. the curule ædiles (two in number), were expected to exhibit public spectacles; and they often lavished the most exorbitant expenses upon them, in order to prepare their way toward higher offices, Cic. Off. 2, 16; Liv. 24, 33; 27, 6. They inspected the plays before exhibition in the theatres, and rewarded or punished the actors according to their deserts, Plaut. Trin. 4, 2, 148; id. Cist. ep. 3;

    for this purpose they were required by oath to decide impartially,

    Plaut. Am. prol. 72.—It was the special duty of the aediles plebeii (of whom also there were two) to preserve the decrees of the Senate and people in the temple of Ceres, and in a later age in the public treasury, Liv. 3, 55. The office of the aediles curules (so called from the sella curulis, the seat on which they sat for judgment (v. curulis), while the aediles plebeii sat only on benches, subsellia) was created A.U.C. 387, for the purpose of holding public exhibitions, Liv. 6, 42, first from the patricians, but as early as the following year from the plebeians also, Liv. 7, 1.—

    Julius Cæsar created also the office of the two aediles Cereales, who had the superintendence of the public granaries and other provisions,

    Suet. Caes. 41.—The free towns also had ædiles, who were often their only magistrates, Cic. Fam. 13, 11; Juv. 3, 179; 10, 102; Pers. 1, 130; v. further in Smith's Dict. Antiq. and Niebuhr's Rom. Hist. 1, 689 and 690.
    Plaut.
    uses the word once adject.: aediles ludi, œdilic sports, Poen. 5, 2, 52.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > aedilis

  • 6 cibarius

    cĭbārĭus, a, um, adj. [cibus], pertaining to or suitable for food (class.):

    res,

    Plaut. Capt. 4, 3, 1: leges, i. e. sumptuary laws, laws restraining luxury, Cato ap. Macr. S. 2, 13: uva, suitable only for eating, not for wine, Plin. 14, 3, 4, § 37; cf.:

    uva vilitatis cibariae,

    id. 14, 2, 4, § 35.—
    B.
    Subst.: cĭbārĭa, ōrum, n., food, nutriment, victuals, provisions, fare, ration, fodder (in the jurists a more restricted idea than alimenta, which comprises every thing necessary for sustaining life, Dig. 34, 1, 6; cf. ib. 34, 1, 12; 34, 1, 15;

    and in gen. the whole tit. 1: de alimentis vel cibariis legatis),

    Plaut. Truc. 5, 43; Cato, R. R. 56; Col. 12, 14; Suet. Tib. 46:

    congerere,

    Hor. S. 1, 1, 32;

    Dig. l. l. al.—Of soldiers,

    Varr. L. L. 5, § 90 Müll.; Caes. B. G. 1, 5; 3, 18; Nep. Eum. 8, 7; cf. Liv. 21, 49, 8; Cic. Tusc. 2, 16, 37; Quint. 5, 13, 17; Suet. Galb. 7 al.—Of the provincial magistrates, corn allowed to deputies:

    cibaria praefecti,

    Cic. Att. 6, 3, 6; id. Verr. 2, 3, 30, § 72; 2, 3, 93, §§ 216 and 217; id. Fam. 5, 20, 9.—Of cattle, Cato. R. R. 60; Varr. R. R. 2, 9, 6; 3, 16, 4; Cic. Rosc. Am. 20, 56; Col. 4, 8, 5 al. —In sing., Sen. Ben. 3, 21, 2.—
    II.
    Meton. (in accordance with the fare given to servants), ordinary, common:

    panis,

    black bread, Cic. Tusc. 5, 34, 97 (cf. Isid. Orig. 20, 2, 15: panis cibarius est, qui ad cibum servis datur, nec delicatus); so subst.: cĭbā-rĭum, ii, n., also called cibarium secundarium, the coarser meal which remains after the fine wheat flour, shorts, Plin. 18, 9, 20, § 87: vinum, Varr. ap. Non. p. 93, 14:

    oleum,

    Col. 12. 50, 18 sq.:

    sapor,

    id. 12, 11, 2 Schneid.—
    B.
    Trop.: cibarius Aristoxenus, i. e. an ordinary musician, Varr. ap. Non. p. 93, 15.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > cibarius

  • 7 decemviri

    dĕcem-vĭri (in MSS. and old edd. often Xviri), um or ōrum ( gen. -virum, Cic. Agr. 2, 15, 39; 2, 21, 56; id. Rep. 2, 36, 61; Varr. L. L. 9, § 85 Müll.; Liv. 27, 8; 40, 12: -virorum only in Liv., where it is very freq.), m. [vir], a college or commission of ten men, the decemviri or decemvirs, Roman magistrates of various kinds.
    I.
    The most famous were called decemviri legibus scribundis, the composers of the Twelve Tables, who ruled alone, and absolutely, in the years of Rome 303 to 305 (legally only 303 and 304; hence "neque decemviralis potestas ultra biennium," Tac. A. 1, 1), Cic. Rep. 2, 36 sq.; Liv. 3, 32 sq.; Gell. 20, 1, 3.—In sing., Cic. Rep. 2, 36 fin.; Liv. 3, 33 fin.; 40; 46; 48 al. The fragments which remain of these laws form one of the most important monuments of the early Latin language; and have been critically edited by R. Schoell, Leips., 1866; cf. Momms. Rom. Hist. book 2, ch. 2; Lange, Röm. Alter. 1, 535 sqq.; Wordsworth, Fragm. p. 503 sq.—
    II.
    Decemviri stlitibus (litibus) judicandis, a standing tribunal for deciding causes involving liberty or citizenship, and which represented the praetor, Cic. Or. 46, 156; Suet. Aug. 36; Dig. 1, 2, 2, § 29; Corp. Inscr. Lat. 8, 38 (A. U. C. 615); cf. Cic. Caec. 33, 97. —In the sing., Inscr. Orell. no. 133 and 554. —
    III.
    Decemviri agris dividundis, a commission for distributing the public land to the people, Cic. Agr. 1, 6 sq.; 2, 7 sq.; Liv. 31, 4 and 42; cf.:

    X. VIR. A. D. A. (i. e. decemviri agris dandis assignandis),

    Inscr. Orell. 544.—
    IV.
    Decemviri sacris faciundis, a college of priests who preserved the Sibylline books, had charge of the Apollinaria, etc.; its number in the time of the emperors was increased to sixty, Liv. 10, 8; 25, 12 al.—In sing., Inscr. Orell. 554.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > decemviri

  • 8 urbs

    urbs, urbis (dat. VRBEI, Corp. Inscr. Lat. 206), f. [Sanscr. vardh-, to make strong; cf. Pers. vard-ana, city], a walled town, a city.
    I.
    Lit.
    1.
    In gen.:

    hi coetus sedem primum certo loco domiciliorum causā constituerunt: quam cum locis manuque sepsissent, ejusmodi conjunctionem tectorum oppidum vel urbem appellaverunt, delubris distinctam spatiisque communibus,

    Cic. Rep. 1, 26, 41; cf.:

    post ea qui fiebat orbis, urbis principium,

    Varr. L. L. 5, § 143 Müll.: urbs dicitur ab orbe, quod antiquae civitates in orbem flebant, id. ap. Serv. Verg. A. 1, 12:

    interea Aeneas urbem designat aratro,

    Verg. A. 5, 755 Serv.:

    veni Syracusas, quod ab eā urbe... quae tamen urbs, etc.,

    Cic. Phil. 1, 3, 7: certabant urbem Romam Remoramne vocarent, Enn. ap. Cic. Div. 1, 48, 107 (Ann. v. 85 Vahl.): arce et urbe sum orba, id. ap. Cic. Tusc. 3, 19, 44 (Trag. v. 114 ib.):

    urbes magnae et imperiosae,

    id. Rep. 1, 2, 3:

    urbs illa praeclara (Syracusae),

    id. ib. 3, 31, 43:

    duabus urbibus eversis inimicissimis huic imperio,

    id. Lael. 3, 11.— Rarely, and mostly poet., with the name of the city in gen.:

    urbs Patavi, Buthroti,

    Verg. A. 1, 247; 3, 293:

    Cassius in oppido Antiochiae cum omni exercitu,

    Cic. Att. 5, 18, 1.—With adj. prop.: urbs Romana = Roma, Liv. 9, 41, 16; 22, 37, 12; 40, 36, 14; Flor. 1, 13, 21.—Of other cities (rare and post-class.):

    Lampsacenae urbis salus,

    Val. Max. 7, 3, ext. 4: in urbe Aquilejensi, Paul. v. S. Ambros. 32:

    urbs urbium,

    a metropolis, Flor. 2, 6, 35.—
    2.
    In partic., the city of Rome (like astu, of Athens):

    postquam Urbis appellationem, etiamsi nomen proprium non adiceretur, Romam tamen accipi sit receptum,

    Quint. 6, 3, 103; cf. id. 8, 2, 8; 8, 5, 9:

    hujus urbis condendae principium profectum a Romulo,

    Cic. Rep. 2, 2, 4; cf. id. ib. 1, 47, 71; 1, 1, 1;

    1, 37, 58: (Caesar) maturat ab urbe proficisci,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 7:

    de urbe augendā quid sit promulgatum, non intellexi,

    Cic. Att. 13, 20, 1:

    conditor urbis (Romulus),

    Ov. F. 1, 27:

    (pater) Dextera sacras jaculatus arces Terruit urbem,

    Hor. C. 1, 2, 4:

    minatus urbi vincla,

    id. Epod. 9, 9;

    called also urbs aeterna,

    Amm. 14, 6, 1.— Ad urbem esse, to stop at or near Rome; in publicists' lang., of returning generals, who had to remain outside of the city till the Senate decreed them the right of entrance;

    or of provincial magistrates who were preparing for departure to their provinces,

    Cic. Verr. 1, 15, 45 Ascon.; 2, 2, 6, § 17; Sall. C. 30, 4; Caes. B. C. 6, 1.—
    B.
    Transf., as in Engl.
    1.
    The city, for the citizens (rare; cf.

    civitas): invadunt urbem somno vinoque sepultam,

    Verg. A. 2, 265:

    maesta attonitaque,

    Juv. 11, 198: bene moratae, Auct. ap. Quint. 8, 6, 24.—
    2.
    The capital city, metropolis (post-class.):

    si tam vicinum urbi municipium sit, ut, etc.,

    Dig. 39, 2, 4 fin.; Cod. Th. 14, 1, 3.—
    * II.
    Trop.:

    urbem philosophiae, mihi crede, proditis, dum castella defenditis,

    i. e. the main point, Cic. Div. 2, 16, 37.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > urbs

  • 9 consilium

    cōnsilium, ī, n. (consulo), der Rat, I) aktiv: A) der Rat = die Beratung, Beratschlagung, Beschlußnahme, 1) eig.: consilium u. consilia principum, Liv.: consilia arcana, consilia nocturna, Sall. – adhibere alqm consilio u. alqm od. (bildl.) alqd in consilium, zu Rate, zur Beratung ziehen, Caes. u. Cic.: ire in consilium, sich beraten, Cic.: mittere in consilium, sich beraten lassen, Cic.: habere consilia principum domi, Liv.: consilium habere od. habere coepisse, utrum... an etc., Curt. u. Sen.: alqm od. alqd habere in consilio, jmd. od. etw. zu R. ziehen, seinen Entschluß abhängig machen von jmd. od. etw., Liv., Curt. u.a. (s. Mützell Curt. 3, 5 [13], 12): vestris od. arcanis consiliis interesse, Cic. u. Liv.: non interesse consiliis, Liv. – consilium est de alqa re Carthagini, man hält über etw. B. zu K., Liv.: est res sane magni consilii, Cic.: nihil mihi adhuc accidit, quod maioris consilii esset, Cic.: quasi vero consilii sit res, als ob die Sache eine B. erlaubte, Caes.: ergo haec consilii fuerunt, war Gegenstand der Beratung (= hätte man beraten, wohl überlegen müssen), Cic.: quod in eo genere efficere possis tui consilii est, Cic.: id arbitrium negavit sui consilii esse, Nep.: vestrum iam consilium est, non solum meum, quid sit vobis faciendum, Cic. – Insbes., die Beratung, Sitzung einer Behörde, a) des Senates, gew. consilium publicum (Staatsrat) gen., zB. ad c. publicum convenire, Liv.: c. publicum habere, Cic.: consilii publici participem fieri, Cic. – b) eines Richterkollegiums, viros primarios civitatis multos in consilium advocare, zu einer B. berufen, Cic.: venire in consilium publicae quaestionis, Cic.: adesse in consilio, Cic.: mittere iudices in consilium, die R. zur B. schreiten lassen, Cael. in Cic. ep.: ire in consilium, zur B. schreiten, Cic.: consurgitur in consilium, Cic. – c) eines Magistrates u. seiner Beistände, eines Feldherrn u. seiner Unterbefehlshaber (»der Kriegsrat«), consilium habere, Cic., Caes. u.a.: consilium habere de Histrico bello, Liv.: consilium habere, omnibusne... an, etc., Liv.: esse, adesse alci in consilio, Cic.: dare alqm alci in consilium, zur B. = als Berater, Nep.

    2) meton., der Rat = die Versammlung der beratenden Personen, c. bonorum atque sapientium, Quint.: advocari in consilia amicorum, Quint.: consilium amicorum habere, Nep.: consilium propinquorum (Familienrat) adhibere, Liv.: amicos in consilium rogare, Sen. – bei Dichtern auch v. einer Pers., der Berater, Ratgeber, ille ferox hortator pugnae consiliumque fuit, Ov. trist. 4, 2, 32: v. weibl. Pers., Clymene Aethraque, quae mihi sunt comites consiliumque duae, Ov. her. 17, 268; u. so auch Ov. fast. 3, 276. – Insbes.: a) eine beratende Behörde, ein beratendes Kollegium, ein beratender Ausschuß. So v. Senate = das Ratskollegium, die Ratsversammlung (griech. βουλή), gew. c. publicum, Staatsrat, Cic., od. summum c. orbis terrae, u. erklärend, senatus, id est, orbis terrae c., Reichsrat, Cic.: orbis terrae sanctissimum gravissimumque consilium, Cic.: unum liberae civitatis c., senatus, Cic. – c. sanctius, ein engerer Ausschuß des Senates zu Karthago, Liv., u. (= ἀπόκλητοι) der engere Rat der Ätolier, Liv. – consilia sortiri semestria, engere Ausschüsse des Senates, Kommissionen, Suet. – v. Richterkollegium, c. publicum, Staatsrat, Cic.: c. sanctissimum, v. Areopag, Val. Max.: ex senatu in hoc consilium delecti estis, Cic.: quaesitore consilioque delecto, Cic.: de uno reo consilium cogitur, Quint.: alterna consilia reicere, Cic.: consilium dimittere, Cic. – v. einem engern Rat, Ausschuß der Zentumvirn (da das Richterkollegium der Zentumvirn in vier solcher Ausschüsse zerfiel, die entweder einzeln verschiedene Prozesse od. in Plenarsitzung einen wichtigen Prozeß entschieden), sedebant centum et octoginta iudices; tot enim quattuor consiliis colliguntur, Plin. ep. 6, 33, 3: omnibus non solum consiliis sed etiam sententiis superior discessit, Val. Max. 7, 7, 1. – b) die beratenden Beistände, der Beirat, Rat, des römischen Königs (als Richter), des Prätors (als Einzelrichter), des röm. Feldherrn, des Statthalters, ausländischer Feldherren u. Fürsten, bes. oft Kriegsrat, Kriegsgericht, c. militare, Liv.: c. castrense (Ggstz. patres, der Senat), Liv.: consilii bellici auctores, die Stimmführer im Kriegsrat, Cic. – cum Tatio in regium consilium delegit principes (v. Romulus), Liv.: cognitiones capitalium rerum sine consiliis per se solus exercebat (v. Könige Tarquinius), Liv.: cum consilio causam Mamertinorum cognoscere (v. Prätor), Cic. – consilium convocare, Caes., od. advocare, Liv.: eorum consilium habere, Sall.: consilium dimittere, dimittere atque ablegare, Cic.: rem ad consilium deferre, Caes., od. referre, Nep.: ex consilii sententia in custodiam coniectus, Nep.

    B) der Rat = das Vermögen, eine Sache zu überlegen, die Überlegung, besonnene Klugheit, Einsicht (bes. oft die staatsmännische), u. in Tätigkeit = die besonnene, kluge Berechnung, die Absicht (vgl. Ruhnken Ter. Andr. 3, 5, 2), magnitudo cum animi tum etiam ingenii atque consilii, Cic.: vir magni, maximi consilii, Caes. u. Nep.: homo minimi consilii, Cic.: mulier imbecilli consilii, Cic.: consilii plenus, Plaut. u. Nep.: tam iners, tam nulli consili sum, Ter. Andr. 608 (vgl. Cic. Rosc. com. 48): animal hoc plenum rationis et consilii (vom Menschen), Cic.: barbaris consilium non defuit, Caes.: simul consilium cum re amisisti? hast mit dem Gelde auch den Kopf verloren? Ter.: consilio valere, Cic.: aetate et consilio ceteros anteire, Sall. fr.: acta illa res est animo virili, consilio puerili, Cic.: ratio bono consilio a dis immortalibus data, mit reiflicher Überlegung, aus gutem Grunde, Cic.: u. so id fecisse bono consilio, Cic. – in bezug auf lebl. Subjj., vis consilii expers, Hor.: quae res in se neque consilium neque modum habet ullum, Ter.

    II) passiv, der Rat, der gefaßt wird u. der jmdm. gegeben wird, a) der Rat, der gefaßt wird, der Ratschluß, Beschluß, Entschluß (die Entschließung), die Maßnahme, Maßregel, Bestrebung, die vorgefaßte Absicht, der gefaßte Gedanke, der Anschlag, der leitende Grundsatz od. die leitenden Grundsätze, der leitende Geist, das leitende Prinzip, das leitende Interesse, auch die getroffene Vorkehrung, das beabsichtigte Beginnen (Ggstz. conatus, factum, u. im Plur. Ggstz. conatus, conata, eventa, acta, facta), α) übh.: consilii auctor, consilii socius, Liv.: administer consiliorum tuorum, Cic. – certus consilii (fest im E.), Sen. de brev. vit. 3, 3. Tac. hist. 2, 46; Ggstz. incertus consilii, Ter. Phorm. 578. Curt. 8, 10 (37), 27, od. dubius consilii, Iustin. 2, 13, 1. – c. amentissimum alcis, Cic.: audax, Liv.: calidum, calidius, Liv. (s. Fabri Liv. 22, 24, 2): u. so consilia calida (Ggstz. quieta et cogitata), Cic.: c. callidum, Ter.: consilia certa (Ggstz. incerta), Ter.: clandestinum (Intrige), Caes.: c. crudele, Cic.: consilia domestica (Kabinettsbefehle), Liv.: c. fidele, aus Treue (Anhänglichkeit) hervorgegangen, Liv.: c. infelix (unseliger Gedanke), Liv.: c. immaturum, Liv.: consilia mala, Sen.: consilia mediocria, gewöhnliche, nicht sonderlich gefährliche, Cic.: c. periculosum, Val. Max.: consilia perniciosa rei publicae, Cic.: c. plenum sceleris et audaciae, Cic.: consilia prava, krumme Wege (Ggstz. recta), Liv.: c. stultum, Cic.: consilia subita et repentina, Caes.: c. temerarium, Vell.: c. urbanum, der Beschluß innerer Politik, Cic. – c. aedificationis od. aedificandi, Bauplan, Cic.: regni consilia, Absichten auf Alleinherrschaft, Liv.: belli pacisque consilia, äußere u. innere Politik, Liv.: consilia caedis (Mordanschläge) adversum (gegen) imperatorem, Tac. ann. 6, 8: consilia eorum de tyrannicidio, Plin. 34, 72. – abicere consilium profectionis, Cic., od. aedificandi, Cic., od. mittendi Hannibalis, Liv.: afferre (erteilen) consilium, Liv. u. Curt. – capere consilium, Cic., u. consilium ex tempore od. ex re et ex tempore, Cic.: capere sibi consilium, Caes., u. sibi separatim a reliquis, Caes.: u. bes. capere consilium m. folg. Genet. Gerundii od. Gerundivi, zB. migrandi, Liv.: belli renovandi legionisque opprimendae, Caes.; od. m. folg. Infin., zB. non adesse, Cic.: ex oppido profugere, Caes.; od. m. folg. ut u. Konj., zB. subito consilium cepi, ut antequam luceret exirem, Cic.: temerarium capit consilium, ut nocte Indebili obviam iret, Liv. (s. Weißenb. Liv. 25, 34, 7). – consilium consistit (steht fest), Cic.: coquere secreto ab aliis consilia, Liv.: concoquere clandestina consilia (Ränke schmieden), Liv.: credere alci consilia omnia, Ter. – denudare alci consilium suum, Liv.: detegere consilium, Liv.: deponere adeundae Syriae consilium, Caes.: desistere consilio, Caes.: deterreri ab eo consilio iniquitate loci, Liv.: in quinquagesimum et sexagesimum annum differre sana consilia, Sen. – enuntiare sociorum consilia adversariis, Cic. – est consilium, non est consilium m. folg. Infin. (s. Fabri Sall. Cat. 4, 1 u. Liv. 21, 63, 2), zB. ibi Pomptinium exspectare, Cic.: consilium erat hiemando continuare bellum, Liv.: quos silentio praeterire non fuit consilium, Sall.: m. folg. ut u. Konj., ut filius cum illa habitet apud te, hoc vostrum consilium fuit, Ter. Phorm. 934: ea uti acceptā mercede deseram, non est consilium, Sall. Iug. 85, 8: consilium esse rati, ut se militibus committerent, Liv. 24, 30, 12. – quid sui consilii sit (was sein Plan sei) proponit od. ostendit, Caes. (s. die Auslgg. zu Caes. b. G. 1, 21, 2): quibus id consilii fuisse, ut etc., Caes. – haesitare inter revertendi fugiendique consilium, Curt.: ipse Romam venirem, si satis consilium quadam de re haberem, hinlänglich mit mir im reinen wäre, Cic. – impedire aedificationis consilium, Cic.: inire consilium multae calliditatis, Ov.: inire consilia occulta, Liv.: inire consilium de morte ac de bonis alcis, Cic.: inire consilia clam de bello, Caes.: inire consilium contra alqm od. contra alcis vitam, Cic.: inire consilium ad eius interfectionem, Lampr. Commod. 4, 1: inire consilium m. folg. Genet. Gerundii od. Gerundivi, zB. occidendi te consilium inivimus, Curt.: inire c. senatus interficiendi, Cic.: inire cum alqo consilia interficiendi Caesaris, Vell.: selten m. folg. Infin., iniit consilia reges Lacedaemoniorum tollere, Nep. Lys. 3, 1: od. m. folg. indir. Fragesatz, consilia inibat, quemadmodum etc., Caes. b. G. 7, 43, 5. – scito labare meum consilium, Cic. – minuere consilium suum, von seinem Pl. abgehen, seinen Pl. ändern, Ter.: mutare consilium, Cic. – omnibus alcis consiliis occurrere atque obsistere, Cic.: perimere alcis consilium, gänzlich vereiteln (v. Umständen), Cic.: patefacere consilia, Caes.: patēre consilia tua sentis? Cic.: perficere consilium, Suet. Cal. 56, 1: non paenitet consilii nostri, Cic. – regere omnem rem publicam consilio quodam (nach gewissen Grundsätzen, nach einem gewissen Prinzip), Cic. – omnia utriusque consilia ad concordiam spectaverunt, Cic.: vel suscipere vel ponere vitae necisque consilium, Plin. ep. – his consiliis uti iisdem, von denselben Grundsätzen sich leiten lassen, Cic. – u. sive casu sive consilio (nach dem Ratschluß) deorum immortalium, Caes. – u. so oft Abl. consilio = mit Absicht, absichtlich, si consilio id fecisset, Cic.: bes. m. Ggstz. casu (zufällig), zB. qui casu peccat... qui consilio est nocens, Phaedr.: qui me in consulatu non casu potius existimaret quam consilio fortem fuisse, Cic.; od. m. Ggstz. forte (von ungefähr), zB. pars forte, pars consilio oblati, Liv. (vgl. Fabri Liv. 22, 49, 14); od. mit Ggstz. suā sponte (aus freien Stücken, von selbst), zB. secutum suā sponte est, velut consilio petitum esset, ut vilior ob ea regi Hannibal esset, Liv. – ebenso oft privato consilio, privatis consiliis = im Privatinteresse, aus Sonderinteressen, durch selbstgetroffene Maßregeln, auf eigene Hand (Ggstz. publico consilio, publicis consiliis), zB navis privato consilio aministrabatur, Caes.: privato consilio exercitus comparaverunt, Cic.: id suo privato, non publico fecit consilio, Nep.: non publicis magis consiliis quam privatis munire opes, Liv. – nullo publico consilio, durch keinen Beschluß einer gesetzlichen Staatsgewalt, Cic. – β) als milit. t. t., der listige Kriegsplan, die Kriegslist (vollst. consilium imperatorium, Cic., od. consilium imperatoriae artis, Val. Max., griech. στρατήγημα), c. fallax, Liv.: tali consilio proditores perculit, Nep.: singulari nostrorum militum virtuti consilia cuiusque modi Gallorum occurrebant, Caes.

    b) der Rat, der erteilt, die Ansicht, die mitgeteilt wird, die Maßregel, die angeraten wird, der Ratschlag, die Eingebung, inops consilii, Liv.: orba consilio auxilioque (rat- u. hilflos) res Gabina, Liv. – c. bonum, utile, Sen.: fidele, Curt.: minus fidele, Cic.: vetus ac familiare consilium (ein alter R., ein Familienvermächtnis), Liv. – alci consilium dare, Cic.: bonum consilium dare, Sen.: dare alci minus fidele consilium, Cic.: dare alci consilia recta, Ter., Ggstz. prava, Phaedr.: qui dedit mihi consilium ut facerem, Ter. eun. 1045: non deesse alci consilio, Cic.: egere consilii od. consilio (Ggstz. abundare consilio), Cic.: impertire alci aliquid sui consilii, Cic.: iuvare alqm consilio, Cic.: iuvare alqm operā et consilio, operā consilioque, aut opera aut consilio bono, aut consilio aut re, mit Rat u. Tat, Plaut. u. Ter. (s. Brix Plaut. mil. 137); vgl. consilio atque opibus alcis adiuvatur res publica, Cic.: neglegere alcis salutare consilium, Val. Max.: parēre alcis fidelissimis atque amantissimis consiliis, Cic.: petere ab alqo consilium, Cic.: alcis consilia sequi (befolgen), Liv.: spernere alcis consilium, Curt.: alcis consilio uti, Cic.: arbitrio consilioque auris uti, sein Ohr befragen, Gell.: suo consilio uti, seinem Sinne, Kopfe folgen, Caes.

    lateinisch-deutsches > consilium

  • 10 declarator

    dēclārātor, ōris, m. (declaro), der Verkündiger der Wahl eines Magistrates, honoribus alcis suffragatorem in curia, in campo declaratorem exsistere, Plin. pan. 92, 3.

    lateinisch-deutsches > declarator

  • 11 interdictum

    interdictum, ī, n. (interdico), der Zwischenspruch, I) das Verbot, interdicta mea, Plaut.: mit subj. Genet., Caesaris, Cic.: duodecim tabularum, Plin.: sceleris, Cic.: numen interdictumque deorum immortalium, Cic.: contra interdictum regis, Iustin. – absol., interdicta minacia, Amm.: interdicti metuentes auctoritatem, Amm. – II) als publiz. t. t., Verwaltungsentscheidung des römischen Magistrates mit imperium, ein prätor. Interdikt, Cic. u.a.; vgl. Sohm Institutionen 13. Aufl. 1908. S. 338. Karlowa Röm. Rechtsgeschichte 2, 1001 ff.

    lateinisch-deutsches > interdictum

  • 12 magistratus

    magistrātus, ūs, m. (magister), I) das Amt-, die Würde eines magister, das obrigkeitliche Amt in Rom, magistratum petere, dare, mandare, habere, Cic.: m. obtinere, Caes.: m. gerere, verwalten, Cic. (u. so magistratus gerere, imperia suscipere, Lact.): m. inire od. ingredi, Sall., od. accipere, antreten, Liv.: magistratum deponere, Caes., od. magistratu abire, Cic.: in magistratu manere, Liv.: magistratum continuare, Liv.: in magistratu esse, Liv.: monumenta (Akten) rerum in magistratu gestarum, Plin. – v. den Ehrenstellen außerhalb Roms, in Sizilien, Cic.: in Gallien, Caes. – II) meton., v. dem, der ein obrigkeitliches Amt verwaltet, eine Magistratsperson, eine obrigkeitliche Person, der Staatsbeamte (unterschieden in magistratus ordinarii od. extraordinarii, je nachdem sie regelmäßig u. zu bestimmten Zeiten od. nur außerordentlich unter bestimmten Umständen gewählt wurden; in curules od. non curules, je nachdem ihnen die sella curulis zustand od. nicht; in patricii od. plebeii, je nachdem sie aus dem Patrizier- oder Plebejerstande genommen wurden; in maiores od. minores (od. inferioris iuris), je nachdem sie auspicia maiora od. minora halten durften, (wobei noch zu bemerken, daß die mag. mai. in den Zenturiatkomitien, die mag. min. in den Tributkomitien bestimmt wurden), est proprium munus magistratus intellegere, se gerere personam civitatis, Cic.: creare magistratus, Liv.: oppida per magistratus administrare, Sall.: magistratus intermittere, die weltlichen Behörden suspendieren, Caes.: his magistratibus, unter ihrer Amtsführung, -ihrem Konsulate, Nep. – Ggstz., magistratus an privatus, Quint.: inter filium magistratum et patrem privatum, Gell. – Sing. kollektiv = das Beamtenkollegium, die obrigkeitliche Behörde, Obrigkeit (wie im Griech. ἀρχή = ἄρχοντες), Nep. Them. 7, 4; Lys. 4, 3 (bei Cicero u.a. Plur. magistratus). – / Abl. magistrato, Lex colon. Genet. im Corp. inscr. Lat. 2, 5439, 4, 2. lin. 4: Nomin. Plur. magistratuus, Corp. inscr. Lat. 10, 3678, magistrates, Charis. 32, 26, magistrati, Fasti Philocali 31. Dec. im Corp. inscr. Lat. 12, p. 278: Akk. Plur. macistratos, Corp. inscr. Lat. 1, 195. lin. 3.

    lateinisch-deutsches > magistratus

  • 13 principalis

    prīncipālis, e (princeps), I) der erste, ursprüngliche, causae, Cic.: significatio, Quint.: verba, Gell. – II) übtr., der erste, vornehmste, hauptsächlichste, A) im allg.: vir, Apul.: quaestio, Quint.: principale fuit, Hauptsache, Sache von Wichtigkeit, Plin. – Compar. principalior, Tert. adv. Marc. 4, 36 u. de anim. 43. Boëth. in Aristot. praedic. 1. p. 113; p. 541; p. 1323. – Superl. principalissimus, Hilar. de synod. 18. – B) insbes.: 1) zum Ersten im Staate-, zum Fürsten (Kaiser) gehörig, fürstlich, kaiserlich, curae, Plin. pan.: maiestas, Suet. – 2) zu den principes (als Soldaten, s. 1. prīncepsno. II, B, 4) gehörig, Veget. mil. 2, 15, 1. – 3) zum Hauptplatze im Lager (principia) gehörig, porta pr. dextra, sinistra, das rechte, linke Seitentor des Lagers, Liv.: pr. via, die breite Querstraße des Lagers, Liv. – 4) subst., principālis, is, m., der Vorsteher, a) übh.: officiorum (der Beamten), Cod. Iust. 9, 51, 1. – b) der Oberälteste des Magistrates einer Munizipalstadt, Symm. epist. 9, 1. Callistr. dig. 48, 19, 27. § 1. – c) ein niederer Offizier, Macer dig. 49, 16, 13. § 4.

    lateinisch-deutsches > principalis

  • 14 relatio

    relātio, ōnis, f. (refero), das Zurücktragen, Zurückbringen, I) eig.: crebra, das öftere Hinführen der Hand nach dem Tintenfaß, um mit der Feder einzutauchen, Quint. 10, 3, 31. – II) bildl.: A) im allg., das Zurückschieben, in den jurist. t. t.: r. criminis, das Zurückschieben des Vorwurfs auf den Urheber, griech. ἀντέγκλημα, Cic. de inv. 1, 15 u. ICt.: iurisiurandi, das Zurückschieben des Eides auf den, der ihn antrug, Ulp. dig. – B) insbes.: 1) die Erwiderung, Vergeltung, gratiae, Sen. ep. 74. § 13 u.a. – 2) (als Redefig.) = επαναφορά, die öftere hervorhebende Wiederholung desselben Wortes, Cic. de or. 3, 207. Quint. 9, 3, 97. Mart. Cap. 5. § 534. Vgl. Ernesti Lexic. techn. Lat. rhet. p. 328. – 3) das Vorbringen, Berichten, die Angabe, Erzählung, a) übh.: relatio contrariorum, die Anführung der direkten Gegensätze, Cic. orat. 106: rerum gestarum, Iustin.: dictorum, Quint.: r. causarum (griech. αἰτιολογία), Angabe der Gründe, Beweisführung, Quint. – b) als publiz. t. t., die Berichterstattung, der Vortrag, Antrag eines Magistrates im Senate, Cic. u.a.: relationem egredi, die Tagesordnung überschreiten, von der T. abweichen (v. Senatoren, wenn sie nach ihrem Entscheid noch ihre Meinung über etw. nicht dahin Gehöriges vorbrachten), Tac. ann. 2, 38: ius tertiae, quartae, quintae relationis, das Recht des Kaisers, im Senate über drei, vier, fünf Gegenstände berichten zu können, Scriptt. hist. Aug.; vgl. Casaub. Suet. Caes. 20. – 4) gramm. u. philos. t. t., die Beziehung, Rücksicht, das Verhältnis, ad aliquid, Quint. 8, 4, 21.

    lateinisch-deutsches > relatio

  • 15 tabella

    tabella, ae, f. (Demin. v. tabula), I) das kleine Brett, die kleine Tafel, das Brettchen, Täfelchen, Plin.: liminis, das Brett der Schwelle, Catull. – II) meton., von dem aus Brett oder wie ein Brett Bereiteten: 1) die Mulde, worin Romulus u. Remus ausgesetzt wurden, Ov. fast. 2, 408. – 2) eine Kuchenscheibe, Mart. 11, 31, 9. – 3) der Fächer, Ov. am. 3, 2, 38. – 4) ein Spielbrett, Ov. art. am. 3, 365 u. trist. 2, 481. – 5) ein Gemälde, Cic. u.a.: comicae tabellae, die Szenen aus theatralischen Darstellungen enthalten, Plin. – 6) die Schreibtafel, das Merkbuch, die Rechentafel, cerata (mit Wachs überzogene), Cic.: abiegnae, Ov.: litteras (Buchstaben) tabellae quam optime insculpere, Quint.: puer tenens tabellam, Plin.: de tabella legit, vom Blatte, Apul.: haben tabellas? Ar. Vis rogare? habeo, et stilum, Plaut.: in tabellis quos consignavi hic heri latrones, Plaut. – Meton. (im Plur., wenn mehrere Blätter): a) = ein Schreiben, Brief, Briefchen, tabellae laureatae, Siegesbotschaft, Liv.: video mitti recipique tabellas, Ov.: tabellas proferri iussimus, Cic.: tabellae signatae, versiegelter Befehl (auf offner See zu öffnen), Auct. b. Afr. 3, 4. Frontin. strat. 1, 1, 2. – b) = die Urkunde (der Brief), der Vertrag, die Niederschrift, Akten ( Papiere), tabellae emptionis, Kaufbrief, Kaufvertrag, Sen. rhet.: tabellae quaestionis, Niederschrift der peinlichen Aussagen, Cic.: tabellae dotis, Ehevertrag, Suet.: tabellis obsignatis agis mecum, nimmst ordentlich eine Niederschrift darüber auf, was ich gesagt habe, Cic.: quadringentorum reddis mihi tabellas, Wechsel, Schuldverschreibung, Mart.: signatis tabellis publicis, öffentliche Papiere, die im Archiv lagen, Liv.: falsas signare tabellas (Testament), Iuven. – 7) das Täfelchen, das man aus Dankbarkeit für seine Rettung in einem Tempel aufhängte, das Votiv-, Gedächtnistäfelchen, votiva, Iuven., u. ohne votiva, Tibull. u. Ov. – 8) das Stimmtäfelchen, a) in den Komitien, entweder zur Wahl eines Magistrates (in welchem Falle der Wähler den Namen des von ihm begünstigten Kandidaten auf das Täfelchen schrieb), od. zur Entscheidung über die Annahme eines vorgeschlagenen Gesetzes (in welchem Falle der Stimmende zur beliebigen Wahl zwei Täfelchen erhielt, das eine mit der bestimmenden Aufschrift U.R., d.i. uti rogas, wie du beantragst, das andere mit der ablehnenden Aufschrift A., d.i. antiquo, ich lasse es beim alten), s. Cic. in Pis. 3 u. 96. Cic. Phil. 11, 19. – b) in Gerichten (wo jeder Richter zur beliebigen Stimmabgabe drei Täfelchen bekam: das eine mit der freisprechenden Aufschrift A., d.i. absolvo, das zweite mit der verurteilenden Aufschrift C., d.i. condemno, das dritte mit der das Urteil aufhebenden Aufschrift N.L., d.i. non liquet), tabella iudicialis, Cic.: tabellam dare iudicibus de alqo, Cic.: ternas tabellas dare ad iudicandum iis, qui etc., Caes.: tabellam dimittere (abgeben), Sen. – / Wegen tabella dimidiata (viell. = kleines, enges Zelt) b. Varro r.r. 3, 3, 1 s. Schneid. comment. p. 493 sq.

    lateinisch-deutsches > tabella

  • 16 collegium

    collegium (conlegium), ii, n. [st2]1 [-] état de gens qui sont collègues, communauté de fonctions. [st2]2 [-] collège, association, corps, compagnie, confrérie.
    * * *
    collegium (conlegium), ii, n. [st2]1 [-] état de gens qui sont collègues, communauté de fonctions. [st2]2 [-] collège, association, corps, compagnie, confrérie.
    * * *
        Collegium. Cic. College, Compaignie, Assemblee, Congregation.
    \
        Adhibere collegium. Cic. Appeler, Faire venir.
    \
        In collegium cooptare. Cic. Eslire et bailler place à aucun en un college.
    \
        Collegium naturae. Plin. Alliance naturelle, Societé.

    Dictionarium latinogallicum > collegium

  • 17 coopto

    cŏopto, āre, āvi, ātum - tr. - associer à, agréger, recevoir, admettre, choisir, nommer, élire.    - cooptare senatores, Cic.: élire des sénateurs.    - cooptare senatum novum, Cic.: créer un nouveau sénat.    - cooptare sibi collegam, Sall.: se donner un collègue.    - cooptare aliquem sub nominatione, Cic.: donner sa voix à qqn.    - cooptare aliquem in patricios, Suet.: admettre qqn parmi les patriciens.
    * * *
    cŏopto, āre, āvi, ātum - tr. - associer à, agréger, recevoir, admettre, choisir, nommer, élire.    - cooptare senatores, Cic.: élire des sénateurs.    - cooptare senatum novum, Cic.: créer un nouveau sénat.    - cooptare sibi collegam, Sall.: se donner un collègue.    - cooptare aliquem sub nominatione, Cic.: donner sa voix à qqn.    - cooptare aliquem in patricios, Suet.: admettre qqn parmi les patriciens.
    * * *
        Coopto, cooptas, cooptare. Cic. Eslire aucun et luy bailler place en un college.
    \
        Cooptare in collegium et in ordinem. Cic. Le recevoir de la compaignie.
    \
        Milites cooptant quem volunt ducem. Ils eslisent un chef ou capitaine.

    Dictionarium latinogallicum > coopto

  • 18 corpus

    corpus, corporis, n. [st2]1 [-] corps, substance, élément. [st2]2 [-] corps (des êtres animés). [st2]3 [-] chair du corps, enbonpoint. [st2]4 [-] corps mort, cadavre, âme, ombre (des morts). [st2]5 [-] individu, personne. [st2]6 [-] corps, ensemble, tout. [st2]7 [-] réunion d'individus; assemblée, corporation, ordre, compagnie, collège, société, peuple.    - corpora individua: corps indivisibles, atomes.    - corpus aquae, Lucr. 2, 232: l'élément de l'eau, l'eau.    - corpus arboris, Plin.: tronc d'un arbre.    - caput est a corpore longe, Ov. M. 11, 794: sa tête est loin du tronc.    - corpore quaestum facere, Plaut. Poen. 5, 3, 21: se prostituer.    - dare pro corpore nummos, Hor. S. 1, 2, 43: payer pour ses testicules, payer pour ne pas être châtré.    - corpus Homeri, Dig.: toutes les oeuvre d'Homère.    - corpus rationum, Dig. 40, 5, 37: livre de compte.
    * * *
    corpus, corporis, n. [st2]1 [-] corps, substance, élément. [st2]2 [-] corps (des êtres animés). [st2]3 [-] chair du corps, enbonpoint. [st2]4 [-] corps mort, cadavre, âme, ombre (des morts). [st2]5 [-] individu, personne. [st2]6 [-] corps, ensemble, tout. [st2]7 [-] réunion d'individus; assemblée, corporation, ordre, compagnie, collège, société, peuple.    - corpora individua: corps indivisibles, atomes.    - corpus aquae, Lucr. 2, 232: l'élément de l'eau, l'eau.    - corpus arboris, Plin.: tronc d'un arbre.    - caput est a corpore longe, Ov. M. 11, 794: sa tête est loin du tronc.    - corpore quaestum facere, Plaut. Poen. 5, 3, 21: se prostituer.    - dare pro corpore nummos, Hor. S. 1, 2, 43: payer pour ses testicules, payer pour ne pas être châtré.    - corpus Homeri, Dig.: toutes les oeuvre d'Homère.    - corpus rationum, Dig. 40, 5, 37: livre de compte.
    * * *
        Corpus, corporis, penul. cor. n. g. Cic. Un corps.
    \
        Corpus, pro sola carne. Cic. Vires et corpus amisi. Je n'ay plus que la peau et les os, je suis tout descharné.
    \
        Auctus corporis. Lucret. Croissance, Accroissement.
    \
        Compagibus corporis includi. Cic. Estre enclos et comme emprisonné dedens le corps, comme est l'ame.
    \
        Corpus mali habitus. Cels. De mauvaise qualité ou complexion, Qui engendre mauvaises humeurs.
    \
        AEquaeuo corpore fratres. Sil. De mesme aage.
    \
        Caeca corpora. Lucret. Invisibles.
    \
        Cassum anima corpus. Lucret. Un corps sans ame.
    \
        Clarum. Seneca. Noble.
    \
        Crassum corpus terrae. Lucr. Espez.
    \
        Laborum ferentia corpora. Tacit. Laborieux, Durs à la peine et au travail.
    \
        Fidele corpus senectae. Pers. Qui ne default point à vieillesse, Qui est encore fort, et se porte bien en vieillesse.
    \
        Fluxa et resoluta corpora. Colum. Corps extenuez et debilitez.
    \
        Formosi corporis spolium dies aufert. Seneca. La beaulté corporelle se perd par laps de temps.
    \
        Frigidum et exangue corpus alicuius complecti. Quint. Embrasser un corps mort.
    \
        Genitalia corpora. Lucr. Les quatre elemens, desquels toutes choses sont engendrees.
    \
        Id aetatis corpora. Tacit. De ceste aage.
    \
        Corpus inane animae. Ouid. Sans ame, Duquel l'ame est sortie.
    \
        Inane corpus. Ouid. Mort.
    \
        Irriguum mero corpus habere. Horat. Avoir beu du vin bien largement.
    \
        Minuta. Lucret. Petits, Menus.
    \
        Niuei corporis foemina. Seneca. Blanche comme neige.
    \
        Prima corpora. Lucret. Les quatre elemens.
    \
        Rarum. Lucret. Qui n'est point espez, Cler.
    \
        Resolutum. Ouid. Tout estendu.
    \
        Semifero corpore mater. Valer. Flac. Demihomme et demi serpent.
    \
        Simulatum corpus. Ouid. L'image de quelque corps.
    \
        Spoliatum lumine corpus. Virg. Un corps mort.
    \
        Subductum. Ouid. Extenué.
    \
        Transformia corpora. Ouid. Qui se peuvent transformer et muer en diverses formes.
    \
        Vescum. Plin. Petit, Menu.
    \
        Vulsum. Quintil. Duquel on a arraché le poil.
    \
        Absumptum corpus. Sil. Consumé.
    \
        Affectum corpus. Liu. Mal disposé, Debilité, Travaillé.
    \
        Condere corpus sepulchro. Ouid. Mettre dedens le sepulchre ou tombeau.
    \
        Corripere e stratis corpus. Virgil. Se lever du lict hastivement.
    \
        Dare tumulo corpora. Ouid. Mettre dedens le tombeau.
    \
        Dare corpus somno. Ouid. Se coucher pour dormir.
    \
        Deiuncta corpora vita. Virgil. Morts.
    \
        Deiecta corpora. Virgil. Choisiz, Esleuz.
    \
        Demittere corpus morti. Ouid. Tuer.
    \
        Deponere corpus. Lucret. Se coucher à terre.
    \
        Deponere corpora sub ramis arboris. Virg. S'asseoir en l'ombre.
    \
        Distorta, et quocunque modo prodigiosa corpora. Quint. Bossus et contrefaicts.
    \
        Distrinxit summum corpus arundo. Ouid. La fleiche l'a un petit atteint et blessé au corps.
    \
        Euirare corpus. Catul. Chastrer.
    \
        Fingere corpus. Seneca. Former, Faire.
    \
        Fundere corpora humi. Virgil. Jecter par terre.
    \
        Vino somnoque per herbam corpora fusa. Virg. Estenduz.
    \
        Humare corpus. Virgil. Enterrer.
    \
        Incondita corpora. Lucan. Qui ne sont point ensepveliz.
    \
        Inhumata corpora. Virgil. Qui ne sont point enterrez.
    \
        Leuare corpus. Horat. Recreer.
    \
        Librare corpus in alas. Ouid. Voler.
    \
        Fessum corpus mandare quieti. Lucret. Se reposer.
    \
        Ex somno corpora moliri. Liu. Se lever du lict.
    \
        Perfusum corpus aeterno frigore lethi. Lucret. Mort.
    \
        Procurare corpora. Virg. Repaistre, Traicter et penser son corps.
    \
        Proiicere corpus. Catul. Abandonner, Hazarder.
    \
        Tingere corpus lymphis. Ouid. Laver.
    \
        Corpus arboris. Plin. Le corps d'un arbre.
    \
        Corpus, pro opere aliquo scripto et volumine. Cic. Videtur mihi modicum quoddam corpus confici posse. Il y a assez de matiere pour en faire un livre à part.
    \
        Corpus. Liu. Le corps et compaignie de quelque gens, College.
    \
        Concessa corpora. Caius. Compaignies permises.

    Dictionarium latinogallicum > corpus

  • 19 decuria

    dĕcŭrĭa, ae, f. [decem] [st2]1 [-] décurie, réunion par dix, dizaine. [st2]2 [-] décurie, corps judiciaire, tribunal. [st2]3 [-] classe, division, corporation, confrérie, collège, assemblée, réunion.
    * * *
    dĕcŭrĭa, ae, f. [decem] [st2]1 [-] décurie, réunion par dix, dizaine. [st2]2 [-] décurie, corps judiciaire, tribunal. [st2]3 [-] classe, division, corporation, confrérie, collège, assemblée, réunion.
    * * *
        Decuria, decuriae. Decuriae. Plin. les cinq bandes des hommes d'armes Rommains assistans pour conseil aux magistrats Rommains congnoissans des causes criminelles: et estoit chascune bande divisee en dix parties: et pourtant s'appeloit Decuria: ou pource qu'en chascune desdictes bandes y avoit mille hommes, qui sont dix fois cent.
    \
        Reiicere decurias. Cic. Recuser.
    \
        Decuria etiam aliorum. Colum. Classes etiam non maiores quam denum hominum faciendae, quas Decurias antiqui appellauerunt. Dizaine, Une bande de dix hommes.
    \
        Decuria. Plaut. Toute bande d'hommes, soit grande ou petite.
    \
        Decurias hominum inducere. Vitru. Y mettre force gents.

    Dictionarium latinogallicum > decuria

  • 20 frater

    frātĕr, tris, m.    - [gr]gr. ϕράτηρ -- angl. brother. [st1]1 [-] frère.    - fratres gemini, Cic. Clu. 16: frères jumeaux.    - fratres gemelli, Ov. H. 8: frères jumeaux.    - fratres germani, Cic.: frères germains, de père et de mère.    - fratres uterini, C. Just.: frères utérins.    - uxor fratris, Liv.: la belle-soeur.    - tuae uxoris frater, Cic.: ton beau-frère.    - T. hic eius geminust frater. D. Hicinest? T. Ac geminissumus, Plaut. Pers.: T. c'est son frère jumeau. D. Celui-là? T. Et on ne peut plus jumeau.    - Frater Solis et Lunae, Amm. 17: le Frère du Soleil et de la Lune (titre donné aux rois de Perse). [st1]2 [-] cousin.    - frater (patruelis): cousin germain, cousin du côté du père.    - Cicero frater noster, cognatione patruelis, amore germanus, Cic. Fin. 5: Cicéron, notre frère, cousin de père par le sang, frère germain par l'affection. [st1]3 [-] frère, ami; amant (t. de tendresse). da Trebio, pone ad Trebium. vis, frater, ab ipsis ilibus? Juv. 5: donne à Trébius! sers Trébius! veux-tu, frère, un morceau juste dans le filet? [st1]4 [-] au plur. frères et soeurs; concitoyens; alliés, confédérés; prêtres d'un même collège; frères (entre chrétiens); ouvrages du même auteur; objets qui se ressemblent.    - fratres Arvales: les frères arvales (les 12 Arvales célèbrent tous les ans en mai, dans un bois sacré près de Rome, une cérémonie en l’honneur de Dea Dia, la Terre nourricière).    - aspicies illic positos ex ordine fratres, Ov. Tr. 1: tu y verras rangés en bon ordre tes frères (les livres dont je suis l'auteur).    - nummi, vos estis fratres, Juv.: mes écus, vous êtes tous frères.    - Haedui, fratres consanguineique saepe numero a senatu appellati, Caes. BG. 1: les Héduens, que le sénat avait si souvent appelés du titre de frères et d'alliés.
    * * *
    frātĕr, tris, m.    - [gr]gr. ϕράτηρ -- angl. brother. [st1]1 [-] frère.    - fratres gemini, Cic. Clu. 16: frères jumeaux.    - fratres gemelli, Ov. H. 8: frères jumeaux.    - fratres germani, Cic.: frères germains, de père et de mère.    - fratres uterini, C. Just.: frères utérins.    - uxor fratris, Liv.: la belle-soeur.    - tuae uxoris frater, Cic.: ton beau-frère.    - T. hic eius geminust frater. D. Hicinest? T. Ac geminissumus, Plaut. Pers.: T. c'est son frère jumeau. D. Celui-là? T. Et on ne peut plus jumeau.    - Frater Solis et Lunae, Amm. 17: le Frère du Soleil et de la Lune (titre donné aux rois de Perse). [st1]2 [-] cousin.    - frater (patruelis): cousin germain, cousin du côté du père.    - Cicero frater noster, cognatione patruelis, amore germanus, Cic. Fin. 5: Cicéron, notre frère, cousin de père par le sang, frère germain par l'affection. [st1]3 [-] frère, ami; amant (t. de tendresse). da Trebio, pone ad Trebium. vis, frater, ab ipsis ilibus? Juv. 5: donne à Trébius! sers Trébius! veux-tu, frère, un morceau juste dans le filet? [st1]4 [-] au plur. frères et soeurs; concitoyens; alliés, confédérés; prêtres d'un même collège; frères (entre chrétiens); ouvrages du même auteur; objets qui se ressemblent.    - fratres Arvales: les frères arvales (les 12 Arvales célèbrent tous les ans en mai, dans un bois sacré près de Rome, une cérémonie en l’honneur de Dea Dia, la Terre nourricière).    - aspicies illic positos ex ordine fratres, Ov. Tr. 1: tu y verras rangés en bon ordre tes frères (les livres dont je suis l'auteur).    - nummi, vos estis fratres, Juv.: mes écus, vous êtes tous frères.    - Haedui, fratres consanguineique saepe numero a senatu appellati, Caes. BG. 1: les Héduens, que le sénat avait si souvent appelés du titre de frères et d'alliés.
    * * *
        Frater, huius fratris. Frere.
    \
        Fratres nostri Hedui. Cic. Noz alliez et confederez.
    \
        Fratres patrueles. Cic. Deux cousins germains filz de deux freres.
    \
        Fratres gemini, non Gemini fratres, vt docet Quintilianus. Cic. Freres gemeaux, Bessons, Qui sont d'une ventree.

    Dictionarium latinogallicum > frater

Look at other dictionaries:

  • France — /frans, frahns/; Fr. /frddahonns/, n. 1. Anatole /ann nann tawl /, (Jacques Anatole Thibault), 1844 1924, French novelist and essayist: Nobel prize 1921. 2. a republic in W Europe. 58,470,421; 212,736 sq. mi. (550,985 sq. km). Cap.: Paris. 3.… …   Universalium

  • United Kingdom — a kingdom in NW Europe, consisting of Great Britain and Northern Ireland: formerly comprising Great Britain and Ireland 1801 1922. 58,610,182; 94,242 sq. mi. (244,100 sq. km). Cap.: London. Abbr.: U.K. Official name, United Kingdom of Great… …   Universalium

  • Europe, history of — Introduction       history of European peoples and cultures from prehistoric times to the present. Europe is a more ambiguous term than most geographic expressions. Its etymology is doubtful, as is the physical extent of the area it designates.… …   Universalium

  • literature — /lit euhr euh cheuhr, choor , li treuh /, n. 1. writings in which expression and form, in connection with ideas of permanent and universal interest, are characteristic or essential features, as poetry, novels, history, biography, and essays. 2.… …   Universalium

  • Ireland — • Ireland lies in the Atlantic Ocean, west of Great Britain . . . Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Ireland     Ireland     † …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • Sierra Leone — Sierra Leonean /lee oh nee euhn/. /lee oh nee, lee ohn / an independent republic in W Africa: member of the Commonwealth of Nations; formerly a British colony and protectorate. 4,891,546; 27,925 sq. mi. (72,326 sq. km). Cap.: Freetown. * * *… …   Universalium

  • Australia — /aw strayl yeuh/, n. 1. a continent SE of Asia, between the Indian and the Pacific oceans. 18,438,824; 2,948,366 sq. mi. (7,636,270 sq. km). 2. Commonwealth of, a member of the Commonwealth of Nations, consisting of the federated states and… …   Universalium

  • Egypt, ancient — Introduction  civilization in northeastern Africa dating from the 3rd millennium BC. Its many achievements, preserved in its art and monuments, hold a fascination that continues to grow as archaeological finds expose its secrets. This article… …   Universalium

  • Newton, New Zealand — Newton The former Orange Hall, a well known Newton landmark. Basic information Local authority Auckland City Population …   Wikipedia

  • NEWSPAPERS, HEBREW — This article is arranged according to the following outline: the spread of the hebrew press main stages of development In Europe Through the Early 1880s ideology of the early press in europe until world war i in europe between the wars the… …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • Italy — /it l ee/, n. a republic in S Europe, comprising a peninsula S of the Alps, and Sicily, Sardinia, Elba, and other smaller islands: a kingdom 1870 1946. 57,534,088; 116,294 sq. mi. (301,200 sq. km). Cap.: Rome. Italian, Italia. * * * Italy… …   Universalium

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

Wir verwenden Cookies für die beste Präsentation unserer Website. Wenn Sie diese Website weiterhin nutzen, stimmen Sie dem zu.