Translation: from latin

clownishly

  • 1 rūsticē

        rūsticē adj. with comp.    [rusticus], in a rustic manner, like a rustic: loqui.— Boorishly, rudely, clownishly: urgere: Rusticius tonsus, H.
    * * *
    rusticius, rusticissime ADV
    in the manner of a rustic/countrified style; clumsily, uncouthly, boorishly

    Latin-English dictionary > rūsticē

  • 2 rusticus

    rustĭcus, a, um, adj. [rus], of or belonging to the country, rural, rustic, country- (very freq. and class.; syn. agrestis; opp. urbanus).
    I.
    Lit.:

    vita,

    Varr. R. R. 3, 1, 1; cf.:

    vita haec rustica, quam tu agrestem vocas,

    Cic. Rosc. Am. 27, 75:

    duae vitae hominum, rustica et urbana,

    id. ib. 17, 48:

    Romani (opp. urbani),

    Varr. R. R. 2, praef. § 1; cf. plebes (opp. urbana), Col. praef. § 17;

    praedia,

    Cic. Rosc. Am. 15, 42:

    hortus,

    Plin. Ep. 2, 17, 15:

    instrumentum,

    Phaedr. 4, 4, 24:

    opus,

    Ter. Heaut. 1, 1, 90:

    res,

    Cic. de Or. 1, 16, 69; 1, 58, 249;

    Col. praef. § 19 sq.: homo (with agricola),

    Cic. Rosc. Am. 49, 143; id. N. D. 3, 5, 11:

    colona,

    Ov. F. 2, 645; cf.

    Phidyle,

    Hor. C. 3, 23, 2:

    mus (opp. urbanus),

    id. S. 2, 6, 80; 115:

    gallinae,

    heathcocks, Varr. R. R. 3, 9, 16; Col. 8, 2, 1 sq. (cf. infra, B. 2. b.):

    numina,

    Ov. M. 1, 192:

    fistula,

    id. ib. 8, 191:

    sedulitas,

    id. F. 6, 534:

    regna,

    id. H. 4, 132:

    opprobria versibus alternis,

    Hor. Ep. 2, 1, 146:

    carcer,

    Juv. 14, 24.—
    B.
    Substt.
    1.
    ru-stĭcus, i, m., a countryman, rustic, peasant; in plur.: rustici, country people, rustics:

    urbani fiunt rustici, etc.,

    Plaut. Mere. 4, 3, 15 sq.:

    omnes urbani, rustici,

    Cic. Fin. 2, 23, 77; cf. id. Or. 24, 81;

    semper occant prius quam sarriunt rustici,

    Plaut. Capt. 3, 5, 5; id. Most. 5, 1, 28; Col. 2, 4, 8; 9, 10 et saep.—In sing., Ov. M. 2, 699; Hor. Epod. 2, 68; id. Ep. 1, 7, 83; 2, 2, 39; Vulg. Sap. 17, 16.—
    2.
    rustĭca, ae, f.
    a.
    A country girl, Ov. M. 5, 583.—
    b.
    (Sc. gallina.) A heath-cock, Mart. 13, 76 (cf. supra, A., and rusticulus, II. B.).—
    II.
    Transf., countrylike, rustic, simple, in a good or (more freq.) in a bad sense, i. e. plain, simple, provincial, rough, coarse, gross, awkward, clownish, etc. (in this sense not freq. till after the Aug. period;

    previously, as in Cic., agrestis was more used): rustica vox et agrestis quosdam delectat, etc.... neque solum rusticam asperitatem, sed etiam peregrinam insolentiam fugere discamus,

    Cic. de Or. 3, 11, 42; 12, 44:

    pro bardā et pro rusticā haberi,

    Plaut. Pers. 2, 1, 2:

    rusticus inlitteratusque litigator,

    Quint. 2, 21, 16:

    manus (with indoctae),

    id. 1, 11, 16; cf.

    with indoctus,

    id. 12, 10, 53;

    with barbarus,

    id. 2, 20, 6;

    (opp. disertus) 7, 1, 43: id vitium sermonis non barbarum esse, sed rusticum,

    Gell. 13, 6, 2:

    Germana illuvies, rusticus, hircus, hara suis, etc.,

    a lout, clown, Plaut. Most. 1, 1, 39 Lorenz ad loc.:

    rusticus es, Corydon,

    Verg. E. 2, 56:

    quid coeptum, rustice, rumpis iter?

    Ov. Am. 3, 6, 88:

    addidit obscenis convicia rustica dictis,

    id. M. 14, 522: sive procax aliqua est;

    capior, quia rustica non est,

    very prudish, id. Am. 2, 4, 13; cf. id. A. A. 1, 607:

    nec tamen est, quamvis agros amet illa feraces, Rustica,

    id. Am. 3, 10, 18.—In a good sense:

    mores,

    Cic. Rosc. Am. 27, 75:

    veritas,

    Mart. 10, 72, 11. — Comp.:

    simus hoc titulo rusticiore contenti,

    Sen. Ep. 88, 33.—Hence, adv.: ru-stĭcē (acc. to II.), in a countrified manner, clownishly, boorishly, awkwardly:

    loquinon aspere, non vaste, non rustice,

    Cic. de Or. 3, 12, 45:

    urgere,

    id. Off. 3, 9, 39:

    facere aliquid,

    id. Att. 12, 36, 2:

    cum eo vitio loquentes rustice loqui dictitabant,

    Gell. 13, 6, 2.— Comp.:

    rusticius toga defluit,

    Hor. S. 1, 3, 31.— Sup. does not occur.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > rusticus

  • 3 subrusticus

    sur-rustĭcus ( subr-), a, um, adj., somewhat clownish or rustic:

    sonare subagreste quiddam planeque surrusticum,

    Cic. Brut. 74, 259; id. Or. 48, 161:

    pudor quidam paene surrusticus,

    id. Fam. 5, 12, 1.—
    * Adv.: surrustĭcē, somewhat clownishly, Gell. praef. § 10.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > subrusticus

  • 4 surrusticus

    sur-rustĭcus ( subr-), a, um, adj., somewhat clownish or rustic:

    sonare subagreste quiddam planeque surrusticum,

    Cic. Brut. 74, 259; id. Or. 48, 161:

    pudor quidam paene surrusticus,

    id. Fam. 5, 12, 1.—
    * Adv.: surrustĭcē, somewhat clownishly, Gell. praef. § 10.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > surrusticus

Look at other dictionaries:

  • clownishly — adverb In a clownish, undignified, or foolish manner; absurdly, ridiculously. 1916 The swift December dusk had come tumbling clownishly after its dull day James Joyce, Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man …   Wiktionary

  • Clownishly — Clownish Clown ish, a. Of or resembling a clown, or characteristic of a clown; ungainly; awkward. Clownish hands. Spenser. Clownish mimic. Prior. {Clown ish*ly}, adv. Syn: Coarse; rough; clumsy; awkward; ungainly; rude; uncivil; ill bred;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • clownishly — adverb see clownish …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • clownishly — See clownish. * * * …   Universalium

  • clownishly — adv. in a clownish manner, foolishly …   English contemporary dictionary

  • clownishly — adverb : in a clownish manner …   Useful english dictionary

  • Chuffily — Chuff i*ly, adv. Clownishly; surlily. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • clownish — adjective Date: 1563 resembling or befitting a clown (as in ignorance and lack of sophistication) Synonyms: see boorish • clownishly adverb • clownishness noun …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • card — I. transitive verb Date: 14th century to cleanse, disentangle, and collect together (as fibers) by the use of cards preparatory to spinning • carder noun II. noun Etymology: Middle English carde, from Medieval Latin cardus, carduus, thistle,… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • I, Mudd — Star Trek: The Original Series episode Harry Mudd meets his nemesis , Stella 1 Episode no. E …   Wikipedia

  • Creator (song) — Creator Single by Santogold featuring Switch Freq Nasty from the album Santogold A side …   Wikipedia

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

Wir verwenden Cookies für die beste Präsentation unserer Website. Wenn Sie diese Website weiterhin nutzen, stimmen Sie dem zu.