Translation: from latin

belonging to the country

  • 1 agrestis

        agrestis e, adj. with comp.    [ager], of the fields, belonging to the country: palmae, wild: poma, V.: frondes, H.: bestiae: pubes, V.: praeda, from the fields, L.—Subst.
    * * *
    I
    countryman, peasant; rube, rustic, bumpkin
    II
    agrestis, agreste ADJ
    rustic, inhabiting countryside; rude, wild, savage; of/passing through fields

    Latin-English dictionary > agrestis

  • 2 paganicus

    paganica, paganicum ADJ
    rustic; belonging to village/country people

    Latin-English dictionary > paganicus

  • 3 Achaia

    Ăchāia or (in poets) Ăchāĭa (quadrisyl.), ae, f. [Achaia].
    I.
    The province of Achaia, in the northern part of the Peloponnesus, on the Gulf of Corinth, earlier called Aegialea (maritime country), Mel. 2, 3, 4; Plin. 4, 5, 6.—Hence,
    B.
    In gen. (cf. the Homeric Achaioi), for Greece, opposite to Troja:

    et quot Troja tulit, vetus et quot Achaia formas,

    Prop. 2, 21, 53; cf. Ov. M. 8, 268; id. Her. 17, 209 al.—
    II.
    After the destruction of Corinth by Mummius, B. C. 146, Greece proper became a Rom. prov. under the name of Achaia. — Hence, Ăchāĭăs, ădis, adj., An Achaean or Greek woman, Ov. H. 3, 71.— Ăchāĭ-cus, a, um, adj., Achaean, Grecian.
    I.
    Poet., opp. to Trojan:

    manus,

    Verg. A. 5, 623:

    ignis,

    Hor. C. 1, 15, 35.—
    II.
    Belonging to the Roman province Achaia:

    homines,

    Cic. Att. 1, 13, 1:

    negotium,

    id. Fam. 4, 4, 2:

    concilium,

    Liv. 43, 17, 4.—Hence L. Mummius obtained, for the destruction of Corinth and the complete subjugation of Greece, the honorary title of Achaïcus. Vell. 1, 13, 2; Plin. 35, 4, 8, § 24;

    and so as surname of one of his descendants: Mummia Achaica,

    Suet. Galb. 3.— Ăchāĭs, ĭdis, adj., f.
    I.
    Achaean, Grecian:

    urbes,

    Ov. M. 5, 306.—
    II.
    Subst., = Achaia, Achaia, Greece, Ov. M. 5, 577; 7, 504.— Ăchāĭus, a, um, adj.: Achaean, Grecian ( poet. for Achaïcus and Achaeus):

    castra,

    Verg. A. 2, 462; so Sil. 14, 5; 15, 306.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Achaia

  • 4 Achaias

    Ăchāia or (in poets) Ăchāĭa (quadrisyl.), ae, f. [Achaia].
    I.
    The province of Achaia, in the northern part of the Peloponnesus, on the Gulf of Corinth, earlier called Aegialea (maritime country), Mel. 2, 3, 4; Plin. 4, 5, 6.—Hence,
    B.
    In gen. (cf. the Homeric Achaioi), for Greece, opposite to Troja:

    et quot Troja tulit, vetus et quot Achaia formas,

    Prop. 2, 21, 53; cf. Ov. M. 8, 268; id. Her. 17, 209 al.—
    II.
    After the destruction of Corinth by Mummius, B. C. 146, Greece proper became a Rom. prov. under the name of Achaia. — Hence, Ăchāĭăs, ădis, adj., An Achaean or Greek woman, Ov. H. 3, 71.— Ăchāĭ-cus, a, um, adj., Achaean, Grecian.
    I.
    Poet., opp. to Trojan:

    manus,

    Verg. A. 5, 623:

    ignis,

    Hor. C. 1, 15, 35.—
    II.
    Belonging to the Roman province Achaia:

    homines,

    Cic. Att. 1, 13, 1:

    negotium,

    id. Fam. 4, 4, 2:

    concilium,

    Liv. 43, 17, 4.—Hence L. Mummius obtained, for the destruction of Corinth and the complete subjugation of Greece, the honorary title of Achaïcus. Vell. 1, 13, 2; Plin. 35, 4, 8, § 24;

    and so as surname of one of his descendants: Mummia Achaica,

    Suet. Galb. 3.— Ăchāĭs, ĭdis, adj., f.
    I.
    Achaean, Grecian:

    urbes,

    Ov. M. 5, 306.—
    II.
    Subst., = Achaia, Achaia, Greece, Ov. M. 5, 577; 7, 504.— Ăchāĭus, a, um, adj.: Achaean, Grecian ( poet. for Achaïcus and Achaeus):

    castra,

    Verg. A. 2, 462; so Sil. 14, 5; 15, 306.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Achaias

  • 5 Achaicus

    Ăchāia or (in poets) Ăchāĭa (quadrisyl.), ae, f. [Achaia].
    I.
    The province of Achaia, in the northern part of the Peloponnesus, on the Gulf of Corinth, earlier called Aegialea (maritime country), Mel. 2, 3, 4; Plin. 4, 5, 6.—Hence,
    B.
    In gen. (cf. the Homeric Achaioi), for Greece, opposite to Troja:

    et quot Troja tulit, vetus et quot Achaia formas,

    Prop. 2, 21, 53; cf. Ov. M. 8, 268; id. Her. 17, 209 al.—
    II.
    After the destruction of Corinth by Mummius, B. C. 146, Greece proper became a Rom. prov. under the name of Achaia. — Hence, Ăchāĭăs, ădis, adj., An Achaean or Greek woman, Ov. H. 3, 71.— Ăchāĭ-cus, a, um, adj., Achaean, Grecian.
    I.
    Poet., opp. to Trojan:

    manus,

    Verg. A. 5, 623:

    ignis,

    Hor. C. 1, 15, 35.—
    II.
    Belonging to the Roman province Achaia:

    homines,

    Cic. Att. 1, 13, 1:

    negotium,

    id. Fam. 4, 4, 2:

    concilium,

    Liv. 43, 17, 4.—Hence L. Mummius obtained, for the destruction of Corinth and the complete subjugation of Greece, the honorary title of Achaïcus. Vell. 1, 13, 2; Plin. 35, 4, 8, § 24;

    and so as surname of one of his descendants: Mummia Achaica,

    Suet. Galb. 3.— Ăchāĭs, ĭdis, adj., f.
    I.
    Achaean, Grecian:

    urbes,

    Ov. M. 5, 306.—
    II.
    Subst., = Achaia, Achaia, Greece, Ov. M. 5, 577; 7, 504.— Ăchāĭus, a, um, adj.: Achaean, Grecian ( poet. for Achaïcus and Achaeus):

    castra,

    Verg. A. 2, 462; so Sil. 14, 5; 15, 306.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Achaicus

  • 6 Achais

    Ăchāia or (in poets) Ăchāĭa (quadrisyl.), ae, f. [Achaia].
    I.
    The province of Achaia, in the northern part of the Peloponnesus, on the Gulf of Corinth, earlier called Aegialea (maritime country), Mel. 2, 3, 4; Plin. 4, 5, 6.—Hence,
    B.
    In gen. (cf. the Homeric Achaioi), for Greece, opposite to Troja:

    et quot Troja tulit, vetus et quot Achaia formas,

    Prop. 2, 21, 53; cf. Ov. M. 8, 268; id. Her. 17, 209 al.—
    II.
    After the destruction of Corinth by Mummius, B. C. 146, Greece proper became a Rom. prov. under the name of Achaia. — Hence, Ăchāĭăs, ădis, adj., An Achaean or Greek woman, Ov. H. 3, 71.— Ăchāĭ-cus, a, um, adj., Achaean, Grecian.
    I.
    Poet., opp. to Trojan:

    manus,

    Verg. A. 5, 623:

    ignis,

    Hor. C. 1, 15, 35.—
    II.
    Belonging to the Roman province Achaia:

    homines,

    Cic. Att. 1, 13, 1:

    negotium,

    id. Fam. 4, 4, 2:

    concilium,

    Liv. 43, 17, 4.—Hence L. Mummius obtained, for the destruction of Corinth and the complete subjugation of Greece, the honorary title of Achaïcus. Vell. 1, 13, 2; Plin. 35, 4, 8, § 24;

    and so as surname of one of his descendants: Mummia Achaica,

    Suet. Galb. 3.— Ăchāĭs, ĭdis, adj., f.
    I.
    Achaean, Grecian:

    urbes,

    Ov. M. 5, 306.—
    II.
    Subst., = Achaia, Achaia, Greece, Ov. M. 5, 577; 7, 504.— Ăchāĭus, a, um, adj.: Achaean, Grecian ( poet. for Achaïcus and Achaeus):

    castra,

    Verg. A. 2, 462; so Sil. 14, 5; 15, 306.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Achais

  • 7 Achaius

    Ăchāia or (in poets) Ăchāĭa (quadrisyl.), ae, f. [Achaia].
    I.
    The province of Achaia, in the northern part of the Peloponnesus, on the Gulf of Corinth, earlier called Aegialea (maritime country), Mel. 2, 3, 4; Plin. 4, 5, 6.—Hence,
    B.
    In gen. (cf. the Homeric Achaioi), for Greece, opposite to Troja:

    et quot Troja tulit, vetus et quot Achaia formas,

    Prop. 2, 21, 53; cf. Ov. M. 8, 268; id. Her. 17, 209 al.—
    II.
    After the destruction of Corinth by Mummius, B. C. 146, Greece proper became a Rom. prov. under the name of Achaia. — Hence, Ăchāĭăs, ădis, adj., An Achaean or Greek woman, Ov. H. 3, 71.— Ăchāĭ-cus, a, um, adj., Achaean, Grecian.
    I.
    Poet., opp. to Trojan:

    manus,

    Verg. A. 5, 623:

    ignis,

    Hor. C. 1, 15, 35.—
    II.
    Belonging to the Roman province Achaia:

    homines,

    Cic. Att. 1, 13, 1:

    negotium,

    id. Fam. 4, 4, 2:

    concilium,

    Liv. 43, 17, 4.—Hence L. Mummius obtained, for the destruction of Corinth and the complete subjugation of Greece, the honorary title of Achaïcus. Vell. 1, 13, 2; Plin. 35, 4, 8, § 24;

    and so as surname of one of his descendants: Mummia Achaica,

    Suet. Galb. 3.— Ăchāĭs, ĭdis, adj., f.
    I.
    Achaean, Grecian:

    urbes,

    Ov. M. 5, 306.—
    II.
    Subst., = Achaia, Achaia, Greece, Ov. M. 5, 577; 7, 504.— Ăchāĭus, a, um, adj.: Achaean, Grecian ( poet. for Achaïcus and Achaeus):

    castra,

    Verg. A. 2, 462; so Sil. 14, 5; 15, 306.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Achaius

  • 8 ager

    ăger, gri, m. [agros; Germ. Acker, Eng. acre, Sanscr. agras = surface, floor; Grimm conjectured that it was connected with ago, agô, a pecore agendo, and this was the ancient view; cf. Varr. L. L. 5, § 34 Müll., and Don. ad Ter. Ad. 3, 3, 47; so the Germ. Trift = pasture, from treiben, to drive].
    I.
    In an extended sense, territory, district, domain, the whole of the soil belonging to a community (syn.: terra, tellus, arvum, solum, rus, humus; opp. terra, which includes [p. 70] many such possessions taken together; cf.

    Nieb. Röm. Gesch. 2, 694 sq.): Ager Tusculanus,... non terra,

    Varr. L. L. 7, 2, 84:

    praedā atque agro adfecit familiares suos,

    Plaut. Am. 1, 1, 38:

    abituros agro Achivos,

    id. ib. 1, 53, 71:

    ut melior fundus Hirpinus sit, sive ager Hirpinus (totum enim possidet), quam, etc.,

    Cic. Agr. 3, 2: fundum habet in agro Thurino, id. Fragm. ap. Quint. 4, 2, 131 (pro Tull. 14):

    Rhenus, qui agrum Helvetium a Germanis dividit,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 2 Herz.:

    ager Noricus,

    id. ib. 1, 5:

    in agro Troade,

    Nep. Paus. 3:

    in agro Aretino,

    Sall. C. 36, 1:

    his civitas data agerque,

    Liv. 2, 16:

    in agro urbis Jericho,

    Vulg. Josue, 5, 13.—In the Roman polity: ager Romanus, the Roman possessions in land (distinguished from ager peregrinus, foreign territory) was divided into ager publicus, public property, domains, and ager privatus, private estates; v. Smith's Dict. Antiq., and Nieb. Röm. Gesch. 2, 695 and 696; cf. with 153 sq.—
    II.
    In a more restricted sense.
    A.
    Improdued or productive land, a field, whether pasture, arable, nursery ground, or any thing of the kind; cf. Doed. Syn. 3, 7 sq.; 1, 71; Hab. Syn. 68, and Herz. ad Caes. B. G. 7, 13:

    agrum hunc mercatus sum: hic me exerceo,

    Ter. Heaut. 1, 1, 94:

    agrum de nostro patre colendum habebat,

    id. Phorm. 2, 3, 17:

    ut ager quamvis fertilis, sine culturā fructuosus esse non potest,

    Cic. Tusc. 2, 5; id. Fl. 29:

    agrum colere,

    id. Rosc. Am. 18:

    conserere,

    Verg. E. 1, 73:

    agrum tuum non seres,

    Vulg. Lev. 19, 19:

    (homo) seminavit bonum semen in agro suo,

    ib. Matt. 13, 24; ib. Luc. 12, 16. —
    * Of a piece of ground where vines or trees are planted, a nursery:

    ut ager mundus purusque flat, ejus arbor atque vitis fecundior,

    Gell.
    19, 12, 8.—Of a place of habitation in the country, estate, villa:

    in tuosne agros confugiam,

    Cic. Att. 3, 15 (so agros, Hom. Od. 24, 205).—
    B.
    The fields, the open country, the country (as in Gr. agros or agroi), like rus, in opp. to the town, urbs (in prose writers generally only in the plur.), Ter. Eun. 5, 5, 2:

    homines ex agris concurrunt,

    Cic. Verr. 2, 4, 44:

    non solum ex urbe, sed etiam ex agris,

    id. Cat. 2, 4, 8:

    annus pestilens urbi agrisque,

    Liv. 3, 6; id. 3, 32:

    in civitatem et in agros,

    Vulg. Marc. 5, 14.—And even in opp. to a village or hamlet, the open field:

    sanum hominem modo ruri esse oportet, modo in urbe, saepiusque in agro,

    Cels. 1, 1.—
    C.
    Poet., in opp. to mountains, plain, valley, champaign:

    ignotos montes agrosque salutat,

    Ov. M. 3, 25.—
    D.
    As a measure of length (opp. frons, breadth):

    mille pedes in fronte, trecentos cippus in agrum Hic dabat,

    in depth, Hor. S. 1, 8, 12.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > ager

  • 9 alienum

    ălĭēnus, a, um [2. alius].
    I.
    Adj.
    A.
    In gen., that belongs to another person, place, object, etc., not one's own, another's, of another, foreign, alien (opp. suus): NEVE. ALIENAM. SEGETEM. PELLEXERIS., Fragm. XII. Tab. ap. Plin. 28, 2, and Serv. ad Verg. E. 8, 99: plus ex alieno jecore sapiunt quam ex suo, Pac. ap. Cic. Div. 1, 57; Plaut. Mil. 2, 2, 111; cf. id. ib. 2, 2, 88, and Lind. ib. 2, 3, 3: quom sciet alienum puerum ( the child of another) tolli pro suo, Ter. Hec. 4, 1, 61:

    in aedīs inruit Alienas,

    id. Ad. 1, 2, 9; id. And. 1, 1, 125:

    alienae partes anni,

    Lucr. 1, 182; so Verg. G. 2, 149:

    pecuniis alienis locupletari,

    Cic. Rosc. Am. 47, 137:

    cura rerum alienarum,

    id. Off. 1, 9, 30; 2, 23, 83:

    alienos mores ad suos referre,

    Nep. Epam. 1, 1:

    in altissimo gradu alienis opibus poni,

    Cic. Sest. 20:

    semper regibus aliena virtus formidolosa est,

    Sall. C. 7, 2:

    amissis bonis alienas opes exspectare,

    id. ib. 58. 10 Herz.:

    aliena mulier,

    another man's wife, Cic. Cael. 37:

    mulier alieni viri sermonibus assuefacta,

    of another woman's husband, Liv. 1, 46:

    virtutem et bonum alienum oderunt,

    id. 35, 43:

    alienis pedibus ambulamus, alienis oculis agnoscimus, alienā memoriā salutamus, alienā operā vivimus,

    Plin. 29, 1, 8, § 19:

    oportet enim omnia aut ad alienum arbitrium aut ad suum facere,

    Plin. Ep. 6, 14; so Suet. Claud. 2:

    alienum cursum alienumque rectorem, velut captā nave, sequi,

    Plin. Pan. 82, 3; Tac. A. 15, 1 fin.:

    pudicitiae neque suae neque alienae pepercit,

    Suet. Calig. 36:

    epistolas orationesque et edicta alieno formabat ingenio,

    i. e. caused to be written by another, id. Dom. 20:

    te conjux aliena capit,

    Hor. S. 2, 7, 46; 1, 1, 110; so id. ib. 1, 3, 116:

    vulnus,

    intended for another, Verg. A. 10, 781: aliena [p. 85] cornua, of Actæon transformed into a stag, Ov. M. 3, 139:

    alieno Marte pugnabant, sc. equites,

    i. e. without horses, as footmen, Liv. 3, 62: aes alienum, lit. another's money; hence, in reference to him who has it, a debt; cf. aes. So also:

    aliena nomina,

    debts in others' names, debts contracted by others, Sall. C. 35, 3.—
    B.
    Esp.
    1.
    In reference to relationship or friendship, not belonging to one, alien from, not related or allied, not friendly, inimical, strange, Plaut. Capt. 1, 2, 43:

    alienus est ab nostrā familiā,

    Ter. Ad. 3, 2, 28; id. Heaut. 5, 4, 6 Ruhnk.:

    multi ex finibus suis egressi se suaque omnia alienissimis crediderunt,

    to utter strangers, Caes. B. G. 6, 31:

    non alienus sanguine regibus,

    Liv. 29, 29; Vell. 2, 76.—

    Hence alienus and propinquus are antith.,

    Cic. Lael. 5, 19:

    ut neque amicis neque etiam alienioribus desim,

    id. Fam. 1, 9 Manut.:

    ut tuum factum alieni hominis, meum vero conjunctissimi et amicissimi esse videatur,

    id. ib. 3, 6.—
    2.
    Trop.: alienum esse in or ab aliquā re, to be a stranger to a thing, i. e. not to be versed in or familiar with, not to understand:

    in physicis Epicurus totus est alienus,

    Cic. Fin. 1, 6, 17:

    homo non alienus a litteris,

    not a stranger to, not unversed in, id. Verr. 2, 2, 26.—
    3.
    Foreign to a thing, i. e. not suited to it, unsuitable, incongruous, inadequate, inconsistent, unseasonable, inapposite, different from (opp. aptus); constr. with gen., dat., abl., and ab; cf. Burm. ad Ov. F. 1, 4; Manut. ad Cic. Fam. 9, 14, 5; Spald. ad Quint. 6, 3, 33; Zumpt, Gr. § 384.
    (α).
    With gen.:

    pacis (deorum),

    Lucr. 6, 69:

    salutis,

    id. 3, 832:

    aliarum rerum,

    id. 6, 1064:

    dignitatis alicujus,

    Cic. Fin. 1, 4, 11:

    neque aliena consili (sc. domus D. Bruti),

    convenient for consultation, Sall. C. 40, 5 Kritz al.—
    (β).
    With dat.:

    quod illi causae maxime est alienum,

    Cic. Caecin. 9, 24: arti oratoriae, Quint. prooem. 5; 4, 2, 62; Sen. Q. N. 4 praef.—
    (γ).
    With abl.:

    neque hoc dii alienum ducunt majestate suā,

    Cic. Div. 1, 38, 83:

    homine alienissimum,

    id. Off. 1, 13, 41:

    dignitate imperii,

    id. Prov. Cons. 8, 18:

    amicitiā,

    id. Fam. 11, 27:

    existimatione meā,

    id. Att. 6, 1:

    domus magis his aliena malis,

    farther from, Hor. S. 1, 9, 50:

    loco, tempore,

    Quint. 6, 3, 33.—
    (δ).
    With ab:

    alienum a vitā meā,

    Ter. Ad. 5, 8, 21: a dignitate rei publicae, Tib. Gracch. ap. Gell. 7, 19, 7:

    a sapiente,

    Cic. Ac. 2, 43, 132:

    a dignitate,

    id. Fam. 4, 7:

    navigationis labor alienus non ab aetate solum nostrā, verum etiam a dignitate,

    id. Att. 16, 3.—
    (ε).
    With inf. or clause as subject:

    nec aptius est quidquam ad opes tuendas quam diligi, nec alienius quam timeri,

    Cic. Off. 2, 7, 23:

    non alienum videtur, quale praemium Miltiadi sit tributum, docere,

    Nep. Milt. 6, 1.—
    4.
    Averse, hostile, unfriendly, unfavorable to:

    illum alieno animo a nobis esse res ipsa indicat,

    Ter. Ad. 3, 2, 40; Cic. Deiot. 9, 24:

    a Pyrrho non nimis alienos animos habemus,

    id. Lael. 8 fin.:

    sin a me est alienior,

    id. Fam. 2, 17:

    ex alienissimis amicissimos reddere,

    id. ib. 15, 4 al.:

    Muciani animus nec Vespasiano alienus,

    Tac. H. 2, 74.—Rar. transf. to things; as in the histt., alienus locus, a place or ground unfavorable for an engagement, disadvantageous (opp. suus or opportunus; cf.

    Gron. Obs. 4, 17, 275): alieno loco proelium committunt,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 15:

    alienissimo sibi loco contra opportunissimo hostibus conflixit,

    Nep. Them. 4, 5 Brem.—So of time unfitting, inconvenient, unfavorable, Varr. R. R. 3, 16:

    ad judicium corrumpendum tempus alienum,

    Cic. Verr. 1, 5; id. Caecin. 67:

    vir egregius alienissimo rei publicae tempore exstinctus,

    id. Brut. 1; id. Fam. 15, 14.—Of other things: alienum ( dangerous, perilous, hurtful) suis rationibus, Sall. C. 56, 5; Cels. 4, 5.—
    5.
    In medic. lang.
    a.
    Of the body, dead, corrupted, paralyzed (cf. alieno, II. B. 2.), Scrib. Comp. 201.—
    b.
    Of the mind, insane, mad (cf. alieno and alienatio):

    Neque solum illis aliena mens erat, qui conscii conjurationis fuerant,

    Sall. C. 37, 1 Herz.—
    II.
    Subst.
    1.
    ălĭēnus, i, m., a stranger.
    a.
    One not belonging to one's house, family, or country:

    apud me cenant alieni novem,

    Plaut. Stich. 3, 2, 21:

    ut non ejectus ad alienos, sed invitatus ad tuos īsse videaris,

    Cic. Cat. 1, 9, 23:

    quas copias proximis suppeditari aequius est, eas transferunt ad alienos,

    id. Off. 1, 14: cives potiores quam peregrini, propinqui quam alieni, id. Am. 5, 19:

    quasi ad alienos durius loquebatur,

    Vulg. Gen. 42, 7:

    a filiis suis an ab alienis?

    ib. Matt. 17, 24:

    cives potiores quam peregrini, propinqui quam alieni,

    Cic. Lael. 5:

    quod alieno testimonium redderem, in eo non fraudabo avum meum,

    Vell. 2, 76.—
    b.
    One not related to a person or thing:

    in longinquos, in propinquos, in alienos, in suos irruebat,

    Cic. Mil. 28, 76:

    vel alienissimus rusticae vitae, naturae benignitatem miretur,

    Col. 3, 21, 3.—
    2.
    ălĭēnum, i, n., the property of a stranger:

    Haec erunt vilici officia: alieno manum abstineant, etc.,

    Cato, R. R. 5, 1:

    alieno abstinuit,

    Suet. Tit. 7:

    ex alieno largiri,

    Cic. Fam. 3, 8, 8; so,

    de alieno largiri,

    Just. 36, 3, 9:

    alieni appetens, sui profugus,

    Sall. C. 5; Liv. 5, 5:

    in aliena aedificium exstruere,

    Cic. Mil. 27, 74 (cf.:

    in alieno solo aedificare,

    Dig. 41, 1, 7).— Plur.,
    a.
    The property of a stranger:

    quid est aliud aliis sua eripere, aliis dare aliena?

    Cic. Off. 2, 23; Liv. 30, 30: aliena pervadere, a foreign (in opp. to the Roman) province, Amm. 23, 1.—
    b.
    The affairs or interests of strangers: Men. Chreme, tantumue ab re tuast oti tibi, aliena ut cures, ea, quae nihil ad te attinent. Chrem. Homo sum;

    humani nihil a me alienum puto,

    Ter. Heaut. 1, 1, 23:

    aliena ut melius videant quam sua,

    id. ib. 3, 1, 95.—
    c.
    Things strange, foreign, not belonging to the matter in hand:

    Quod si hominibus bonarum rerum tanta cura esset, quanto studio aliena ac nihil profutura multumque etiam periculosa petunt, etc.,

    Sall. J. 1, 5; hence, aliena loqui, to talk strangely, wildly, like a crazy person:

    Quin etiam, sic me dicunt aliena locutum, Ut foret amenti nomen in ore tuum,

    Ov. Tr. 3, 19:

    interdum in accessione aegros desipere et aliena loqui,

    Cels. 3, 18 (v. alieniloquium).
    Comp. rare, but sup. very freq.; no adv. in use.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > alienum

  • 10 alienus

    ălĭēnus, a, um [2. alius].
    I.
    Adj.
    A.
    In gen., that belongs to another person, place, object, etc., not one's own, another's, of another, foreign, alien (opp. suus): NEVE. ALIENAM. SEGETEM. PELLEXERIS., Fragm. XII. Tab. ap. Plin. 28, 2, and Serv. ad Verg. E. 8, 99: plus ex alieno jecore sapiunt quam ex suo, Pac. ap. Cic. Div. 1, 57; Plaut. Mil. 2, 2, 111; cf. id. ib. 2, 2, 88, and Lind. ib. 2, 3, 3: quom sciet alienum puerum ( the child of another) tolli pro suo, Ter. Hec. 4, 1, 61:

    in aedīs inruit Alienas,

    id. Ad. 1, 2, 9; id. And. 1, 1, 125:

    alienae partes anni,

    Lucr. 1, 182; so Verg. G. 2, 149:

    pecuniis alienis locupletari,

    Cic. Rosc. Am. 47, 137:

    cura rerum alienarum,

    id. Off. 1, 9, 30; 2, 23, 83:

    alienos mores ad suos referre,

    Nep. Epam. 1, 1:

    in altissimo gradu alienis opibus poni,

    Cic. Sest. 20:

    semper regibus aliena virtus formidolosa est,

    Sall. C. 7, 2:

    amissis bonis alienas opes exspectare,

    id. ib. 58. 10 Herz.:

    aliena mulier,

    another man's wife, Cic. Cael. 37:

    mulier alieni viri sermonibus assuefacta,

    of another woman's husband, Liv. 1, 46:

    virtutem et bonum alienum oderunt,

    id. 35, 43:

    alienis pedibus ambulamus, alienis oculis agnoscimus, alienā memoriā salutamus, alienā operā vivimus,

    Plin. 29, 1, 8, § 19:

    oportet enim omnia aut ad alienum arbitrium aut ad suum facere,

    Plin. Ep. 6, 14; so Suet. Claud. 2:

    alienum cursum alienumque rectorem, velut captā nave, sequi,

    Plin. Pan. 82, 3; Tac. A. 15, 1 fin.:

    pudicitiae neque suae neque alienae pepercit,

    Suet. Calig. 36:

    epistolas orationesque et edicta alieno formabat ingenio,

    i. e. caused to be written by another, id. Dom. 20:

    te conjux aliena capit,

    Hor. S. 2, 7, 46; 1, 1, 110; so id. ib. 1, 3, 116:

    vulnus,

    intended for another, Verg. A. 10, 781: aliena [p. 85] cornua, of Actæon transformed into a stag, Ov. M. 3, 139:

    alieno Marte pugnabant, sc. equites,

    i. e. without horses, as footmen, Liv. 3, 62: aes alienum, lit. another's money; hence, in reference to him who has it, a debt; cf. aes. So also:

    aliena nomina,

    debts in others' names, debts contracted by others, Sall. C. 35, 3.—
    B.
    Esp.
    1.
    In reference to relationship or friendship, not belonging to one, alien from, not related or allied, not friendly, inimical, strange, Plaut. Capt. 1, 2, 43:

    alienus est ab nostrā familiā,

    Ter. Ad. 3, 2, 28; id. Heaut. 5, 4, 6 Ruhnk.:

    multi ex finibus suis egressi se suaque omnia alienissimis crediderunt,

    to utter strangers, Caes. B. G. 6, 31:

    non alienus sanguine regibus,

    Liv. 29, 29; Vell. 2, 76.—

    Hence alienus and propinquus are antith.,

    Cic. Lael. 5, 19:

    ut neque amicis neque etiam alienioribus desim,

    id. Fam. 1, 9 Manut.:

    ut tuum factum alieni hominis, meum vero conjunctissimi et amicissimi esse videatur,

    id. ib. 3, 6.—
    2.
    Trop.: alienum esse in or ab aliquā re, to be a stranger to a thing, i. e. not to be versed in or familiar with, not to understand:

    in physicis Epicurus totus est alienus,

    Cic. Fin. 1, 6, 17:

    homo non alienus a litteris,

    not a stranger to, not unversed in, id. Verr. 2, 2, 26.—
    3.
    Foreign to a thing, i. e. not suited to it, unsuitable, incongruous, inadequate, inconsistent, unseasonable, inapposite, different from (opp. aptus); constr. with gen., dat., abl., and ab; cf. Burm. ad Ov. F. 1, 4; Manut. ad Cic. Fam. 9, 14, 5; Spald. ad Quint. 6, 3, 33; Zumpt, Gr. § 384.
    (α).
    With gen.:

    pacis (deorum),

    Lucr. 6, 69:

    salutis,

    id. 3, 832:

    aliarum rerum,

    id. 6, 1064:

    dignitatis alicujus,

    Cic. Fin. 1, 4, 11:

    neque aliena consili (sc. domus D. Bruti),

    convenient for consultation, Sall. C. 40, 5 Kritz al.—
    (β).
    With dat.:

    quod illi causae maxime est alienum,

    Cic. Caecin. 9, 24: arti oratoriae, Quint. prooem. 5; 4, 2, 62; Sen. Q. N. 4 praef.—
    (γ).
    With abl.:

    neque hoc dii alienum ducunt majestate suā,

    Cic. Div. 1, 38, 83:

    homine alienissimum,

    id. Off. 1, 13, 41:

    dignitate imperii,

    id. Prov. Cons. 8, 18:

    amicitiā,

    id. Fam. 11, 27:

    existimatione meā,

    id. Att. 6, 1:

    domus magis his aliena malis,

    farther from, Hor. S. 1, 9, 50:

    loco, tempore,

    Quint. 6, 3, 33.—
    (δ).
    With ab:

    alienum a vitā meā,

    Ter. Ad. 5, 8, 21: a dignitate rei publicae, Tib. Gracch. ap. Gell. 7, 19, 7:

    a sapiente,

    Cic. Ac. 2, 43, 132:

    a dignitate,

    id. Fam. 4, 7:

    navigationis labor alienus non ab aetate solum nostrā, verum etiam a dignitate,

    id. Att. 16, 3.—
    (ε).
    With inf. or clause as subject:

    nec aptius est quidquam ad opes tuendas quam diligi, nec alienius quam timeri,

    Cic. Off. 2, 7, 23:

    non alienum videtur, quale praemium Miltiadi sit tributum, docere,

    Nep. Milt. 6, 1.—
    4.
    Averse, hostile, unfriendly, unfavorable to:

    illum alieno animo a nobis esse res ipsa indicat,

    Ter. Ad. 3, 2, 40; Cic. Deiot. 9, 24:

    a Pyrrho non nimis alienos animos habemus,

    id. Lael. 8 fin.:

    sin a me est alienior,

    id. Fam. 2, 17:

    ex alienissimis amicissimos reddere,

    id. ib. 15, 4 al.:

    Muciani animus nec Vespasiano alienus,

    Tac. H. 2, 74.—Rar. transf. to things; as in the histt., alienus locus, a place or ground unfavorable for an engagement, disadvantageous (opp. suus or opportunus; cf.

    Gron. Obs. 4, 17, 275): alieno loco proelium committunt,

    Caes. B. G. 1, 15:

    alienissimo sibi loco contra opportunissimo hostibus conflixit,

    Nep. Them. 4, 5 Brem.—So of time unfitting, inconvenient, unfavorable, Varr. R. R. 3, 16:

    ad judicium corrumpendum tempus alienum,

    Cic. Verr. 1, 5; id. Caecin. 67:

    vir egregius alienissimo rei publicae tempore exstinctus,

    id. Brut. 1; id. Fam. 15, 14.—Of other things: alienum ( dangerous, perilous, hurtful) suis rationibus, Sall. C. 56, 5; Cels. 4, 5.—
    5.
    In medic. lang.
    a.
    Of the body, dead, corrupted, paralyzed (cf. alieno, II. B. 2.), Scrib. Comp. 201.—
    b.
    Of the mind, insane, mad (cf. alieno and alienatio):

    Neque solum illis aliena mens erat, qui conscii conjurationis fuerant,

    Sall. C. 37, 1 Herz.—
    II.
    Subst.
    1.
    ălĭēnus, i, m., a stranger.
    a.
    One not belonging to one's house, family, or country:

    apud me cenant alieni novem,

    Plaut. Stich. 3, 2, 21:

    ut non ejectus ad alienos, sed invitatus ad tuos īsse videaris,

    Cic. Cat. 1, 9, 23:

    quas copias proximis suppeditari aequius est, eas transferunt ad alienos,

    id. Off. 1, 14: cives potiores quam peregrini, propinqui quam alieni, id. Am. 5, 19:

    quasi ad alienos durius loquebatur,

    Vulg. Gen. 42, 7:

    a filiis suis an ab alienis?

    ib. Matt. 17, 24:

    cives potiores quam peregrini, propinqui quam alieni,

    Cic. Lael. 5:

    quod alieno testimonium redderem, in eo non fraudabo avum meum,

    Vell. 2, 76.—
    b.
    One not related to a person or thing:

    in longinquos, in propinquos, in alienos, in suos irruebat,

    Cic. Mil. 28, 76:

    vel alienissimus rusticae vitae, naturae benignitatem miretur,

    Col. 3, 21, 3.—
    2.
    ălĭēnum, i, n., the property of a stranger:

    Haec erunt vilici officia: alieno manum abstineant, etc.,

    Cato, R. R. 5, 1:

    alieno abstinuit,

    Suet. Tit. 7:

    ex alieno largiri,

    Cic. Fam. 3, 8, 8; so,

    de alieno largiri,

    Just. 36, 3, 9:

    alieni appetens, sui profugus,

    Sall. C. 5; Liv. 5, 5:

    in aliena aedificium exstruere,

    Cic. Mil. 27, 74 (cf.:

    in alieno solo aedificare,

    Dig. 41, 1, 7).— Plur.,
    a.
    The property of a stranger:

    quid est aliud aliis sua eripere, aliis dare aliena?

    Cic. Off. 2, 23; Liv. 30, 30: aliena pervadere, a foreign (in opp. to the Roman) province, Amm. 23, 1.—
    b.
    The affairs or interests of strangers: Men. Chreme, tantumue ab re tuast oti tibi, aliena ut cures, ea, quae nihil ad te attinent. Chrem. Homo sum;

    humani nihil a me alienum puto,

    Ter. Heaut. 1, 1, 23:

    aliena ut melius videant quam sua,

    id. ib. 3, 1, 95.—
    c.
    Things strange, foreign, not belonging to the matter in hand:

    Quod si hominibus bonarum rerum tanta cura esset, quanto studio aliena ac nihil profutura multumque etiam periculosa petunt, etc.,

    Sall. J. 1, 5; hence, aliena loqui, to talk strangely, wildly, like a crazy person:

    Quin etiam, sic me dicunt aliena locutum, Ut foret amenti nomen in ore tuum,

    Ov. Tr. 3, 19:

    interdum in accessione aegros desipere et aliena loqui,

    Cels. 3, 18 (v. alieniloquium).
    Comp. rare, but sup. very freq.; no adv. in use.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > alienus

  • 11 Amiternini

    Ămĭternum, i, n. [acc. to Varr. L. L. 5, 5, 12, from am- = amb- and Aternus], = Amiternon, a very ancient town built by the Aborigines, in the Sabine country, now San Vettorino; cf. Mann. Ital. 1, 509; the birthplace of the historian Sallust.—Derivv.
    A.
    Ămĭternīnus, a, um, adj., belonging to Amiternum, Col. 10, 422.— Ămĭ-ternīni, ōrum, m. subst., its inhabitants, Varr. L. L. 5, 28, p. 11 Müll.; Liv. 28, 45, 19; Plin. 3, 12, 17, § 107.—
    B.
    Ămĭternus, a, um, adj., poet. for Amiterninus:

    cohors,

    Verg. A. 7, 710:

    ager,

    Mart. 13, 20.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Amiternini

  • 12 Amiterninus

    Ămĭternum, i, n. [acc. to Varr. L. L. 5, 5, 12, from am- = amb- and Aternus], = Amiternon, a very ancient town built by the Aborigines, in the Sabine country, now San Vettorino; cf. Mann. Ital. 1, 509; the birthplace of the historian Sallust.—Derivv.
    A.
    Ămĭternīnus, a, um, adj., belonging to Amiternum, Col. 10, 422.— Ămĭ-ternīni, ōrum, m. subst., its inhabitants, Varr. L. L. 5, 28, p. 11 Müll.; Liv. 28, 45, 19; Plin. 3, 12, 17, § 107.—
    B.
    Ămĭternus, a, um, adj., poet. for Amiterninus:

    cohors,

    Verg. A. 7, 710:

    ager,

    Mart. 13, 20.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Amiterninus

  • 13 Amiternum

    Ămĭternum, i, n. [acc. to Varr. L. L. 5, 5, 12, from am- = amb- and Aternus], = Amiternon, a very ancient town built by the Aborigines, in the Sabine country, now San Vettorino; cf. Mann. Ital. 1, 509; the birthplace of the historian Sallust.—Derivv.
    A.
    Ămĭternīnus, a, um, adj., belonging to Amiternum, Col. 10, 422.— Ămĭ-ternīni, ōrum, m. subst., its inhabitants, Varr. L. L. 5, 28, p. 11 Müll.; Liv. 28, 45, 19; Plin. 3, 12, 17, § 107.—
    B.
    Ămĭternus, a, um, adj., poet. for Amiterninus:

    cohors,

    Verg. A. 7, 710:

    ager,

    Mart. 13, 20.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Amiternum

  • 14 Amiternus

    Ămĭternum, i, n. [acc. to Varr. L. L. 5, 5, 12, from am- = amb- and Aternus], = Amiternon, a very ancient town built by the Aborigines, in the Sabine country, now San Vettorino; cf. Mann. Ital. 1, 509; the birthplace of the historian Sallust.—Derivv.
    A.
    Ămĭternīnus, a, um, adj., belonging to Amiternum, Col. 10, 422.— Ămĭ-ternīni, ōrum, m. subst., its inhabitants, Varr. L. L. 5, 28, p. 11 Müll.; Liv. 28, 45, 19; Plin. 3, 12, 17, § 107.—
    B.
    Ămĭternus, a, um, adj., poet. for Amiterninus:

    cohors,

    Verg. A. 7, 710:

    ager,

    Mart. 13, 20.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Amiternus

  • 15 Caere

    Caere, n. indecl. ( gen. Caerĭtis. f., Verg. A. 8, 597; abl. Caerēte, id. ib. 10, 183), = Kairê Steph., Kairea Strab., a very ancient city of Etruria, one of the twelve; previously called Agylla, now Cervetri, Plin. 3, 5, 8, § 51; Serv. ad Verg. A. 8, 597; 10, 183; Liv 1, 60, 2.—
    II.
    Derivv.
    A.
    Caeres, ĭtis and ētis, adj., of or pertaining to Cœre, Cœritic:

    populus,

    Liv. 7, 19, 6:

    aquae,

    Val. Max. 1, 6, 9; cf. Liv. 22, 1, 10.—In plur.: Caerĭtes ( Caerētes), um, m., the inhabitants of Cœre, Liv. 7, 19, 8 and 10; 7, 20, 1; 5, 50, 3. In consequence of assisting the Romans in the Gallic war, they received the privilege of Roman citizenship, but without the jus suffragii. Hence the catalogues of such quasi-citizens were called tabulae Caerites or Caeritum, and Roman citizens, in consequence of disfranchisement inflicted by the censor, were enrolled in these, being deprived of the right of voting;

    hence the odious access. idea of the expression in tabulas Caerites (um) referri,

    to be degraded. Ascon. Cic. Div. in Caecil. 3, 8; Gell. 16, 13, 7 sq.—Hence:

    Caerite cerā ( = tabulā) digni,

    Hor. Ep 1, 6, 62 (notā infamiae et omni ignominiā digni sumus, Schol. Crucq.).—
    B.
    Caerētā-nus, a, um, adj., of or belonging to Cœre:

    amnis,

    Plin. 3, 5, 8, § 51.—Subst.
    1.
    Cae-rētānum, i, n., a country-seat near Cœre, Col. 3, 3, 3.—
    2.
    Caerētāna, ōrum, n. (sc. vina), wine from Cœre, Mart. 13, 124.—
    3.
    Caerētāni, ōrum, m., the inhabitants of Cœre, Val. Max. 1, 1, 1.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Caere

  • 16 Caeres

    Caere, n. indecl. ( gen. Caerĭtis. f., Verg. A. 8, 597; abl. Caerēte, id. ib. 10, 183), = Kairê Steph., Kairea Strab., a very ancient city of Etruria, one of the twelve; previously called Agylla, now Cervetri, Plin. 3, 5, 8, § 51; Serv. ad Verg. A. 8, 597; 10, 183; Liv 1, 60, 2.—
    II.
    Derivv.
    A.
    Caeres, ĭtis and ētis, adj., of or pertaining to Cœre, Cœritic:

    populus,

    Liv. 7, 19, 6:

    aquae,

    Val. Max. 1, 6, 9; cf. Liv. 22, 1, 10.—In plur.: Caerĭtes ( Caerētes), um, m., the inhabitants of Cœre, Liv. 7, 19, 8 and 10; 7, 20, 1; 5, 50, 3. In consequence of assisting the Romans in the Gallic war, they received the privilege of Roman citizenship, but without the jus suffragii. Hence the catalogues of such quasi-citizens were called tabulae Caerites or Caeritum, and Roman citizens, in consequence of disfranchisement inflicted by the censor, were enrolled in these, being deprived of the right of voting;

    hence the odious access. idea of the expression in tabulas Caerites (um) referri,

    to be degraded. Ascon. Cic. Div. in Caecil. 3, 8; Gell. 16, 13, 7 sq.—Hence:

    Caerite cerā ( = tabulā) digni,

    Hor. Ep 1, 6, 62 (notā infamiae et omni ignominiā digni sumus, Schol. Crucq.).—
    B.
    Caerētā-nus, a, um, adj., of or belonging to Cœre:

    amnis,

    Plin. 3, 5, 8, § 51.—Subst.
    1.
    Cae-rētānum, i, n., a country-seat near Cœre, Col. 3, 3, 3.—
    2.
    Caerētāna, ōrum, n. (sc. vina), wine from Cœre, Mart. 13, 124.—
    3.
    Caerētāni, ōrum, m., the inhabitants of Cœre, Val. Max. 1, 1, 1.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Caeres

  • 17 Caeretana

    Caere, n. indecl. ( gen. Caerĭtis. f., Verg. A. 8, 597; abl. Caerēte, id. ib. 10, 183), = Kairê Steph., Kairea Strab., a very ancient city of Etruria, one of the twelve; previously called Agylla, now Cervetri, Plin. 3, 5, 8, § 51; Serv. ad Verg. A. 8, 597; 10, 183; Liv 1, 60, 2.—
    II.
    Derivv.
    A.
    Caeres, ĭtis and ētis, adj., of or pertaining to Cœre, Cœritic:

    populus,

    Liv. 7, 19, 6:

    aquae,

    Val. Max. 1, 6, 9; cf. Liv. 22, 1, 10.—In plur.: Caerĭtes ( Caerētes), um, m., the inhabitants of Cœre, Liv. 7, 19, 8 and 10; 7, 20, 1; 5, 50, 3. In consequence of assisting the Romans in the Gallic war, they received the privilege of Roman citizenship, but without the jus suffragii. Hence the catalogues of such quasi-citizens were called tabulae Caerites or Caeritum, and Roman citizens, in consequence of disfranchisement inflicted by the censor, were enrolled in these, being deprived of the right of voting;

    hence the odious access. idea of the expression in tabulas Caerites (um) referri,

    to be degraded. Ascon. Cic. Div. in Caecil. 3, 8; Gell. 16, 13, 7 sq.—Hence:

    Caerite cerā ( = tabulā) digni,

    Hor. Ep 1, 6, 62 (notā infamiae et omni ignominiā digni sumus, Schol. Crucq.).—
    B.
    Caerētā-nus, a, um, adj., of or belonging to Cœre:

    amnis,

    Plin. 3, 5, 8, § 51.—Subst.
    1.
    Cae-rētānum, i, n., a country-seat near Cœre, Col. 3, 3, 3.—
    2.
    Caerētāna, ōrum, n. (sc. vina), wine from Cœre, Mart. 13, 124.—
    3.
    Caerētāni, ōrum, m., the inhabitants of Cœre, Val. Max. 1, 1, 1.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Caeretana

  • 18 Caeretani

    Caere, n. indecl. ( gen. Caerĭtis. f., Verg. A. 8, 597; abl. Caerēte, id. ib. 10, 183), = Kairê Steph., Kairea Strab., a very ancient city of Etruria, one of the twelve; previously called Agylla, now Cervetri, Plin. 3, 5, 8, § 51; Serv. ad Verg. A. 8, 597; 10, 183; Liv 1, 60, 2.—
    II.
    Derivv.
    A.
    Caeres, ĭtis and ētis, adj., of or pertaining to Cœre, Cœritic:

    populus,

    Liv. 7, 19, 6:

    aquae,

    Val. Max. 1, 6, 9; cf. Liv. 22, 1, 10.—In plur.: Caerĭtes ( Caerētes), um, m., the inhabitants of Cœre, Liv. 7, 19, 8 and 10; 7, 20, 1; 5, 50, 3. In consequence of assisting the Romans in the Gallic war, they received the privilege of Roman citizenship, but without the jus suffragii. Hence the catalogues of such quasi-citizens were called tabulae Caerites or Caeritum, and Roman citizens, in consequence of disfranchisement inflicted by the censor, were enrolled in these, being deprived of the right of voting;

    hence the odious access. idea of the expression in tabulas Caerites (um) referri,

    to be degraded. Ascon. Cic. Div. in Caecil. 3, 8; Gell. 16, 13, 7 sq.—Hence:

    Caerite cerā ( = tabulā) digni,

    Hor. Ep 1, 6, 62 (notā infamiae et omni ignominiā digni sumus, Schol. Crucq.).—
    B.
    Caerētā-nus, a, um, adj., of or belonging to Cœre:

    amnis,

    Plin. 3, 5, 8, § 51.—Subst.
    1.
    Cae-rētānum, i, n., a country-seat near Cœre, Col. 3, 3, 3.—
    2.
    Caerētāna, ōrum, n. (sc. vina), wine from Cœre, Mart. 13, 124.—
    3.
    Caerētāni, ōrum, m., the inhabitants of Cœre, Val. Max. 1, 1, 1.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Caeretani

  • 19 Caeretanum

    Caere, n. indecl. ( gen. Caerĭtis. f., Verg. A. 8, 597; abl. Caerēte, id. ib. 10, 183), = Kairê Steph., Kairea Strab., a very ancient city of Etruria, one of the twelve; previously called Agylla, now Cervetri, Plin. 3, 5, 8, § 51; Serv. ad Verg. A. 8, 597; 10, 183; Liv 1, 60, 2.—
    II.
    Derivv.
    A.
    Caeres, ĭtis and ētis, adj., of or pertaining to Cœre, Cœritic:

    populus,

    Liv. 7, 19, 6:

    aquae,

    Val. Max. 1, 6, 9; cf. Liv. 22, 1, 10.—In plur.: Caerĭtes ( Caerētes), um, m., the inhabitants of Cœre, Liv. 7, 19, 8 and 10; 7, 20, 1; 5, 50, 3. In consequence of assisting the Romans in the Gallic war, they received the privilege of Roman citizenship, but without the jus suffragii. Hence the catalogues of such quasi-citizens were called tabulae Caerites or Caeritum, and Roman citizens, in consequence of disfranchisement inflicted by the censor, were enrolled in these, being deprived of the right of voting;

    hence the odious access. idea of the expression in tabulas Caerites (um) referri,

    to be degraded. Ascon. Cic. Div. in Caecil. 3, 8; Gell. 16, 13, 7 sq.—Hence:

    Caerite cerā ( = tabulā) digni,

    Hor. Ep 1, 6, 62 (notā infamiae et omni ignominiā digni sumus, Schol. Crucq.).—
    B.
    Caerētā-nus, a, um, adj., of or belonging to Cœre:

    amnis,

    Plin. 3, 5, 8, § 51.—Subst.
    1.
    Cae-rētānum, i, n., a country-seat near Cœre, Col. 3, 3, 3.—
    2.
    Caerētāna, ōrum, n. (sc. vina), wine from Cœre, Mart. 13, 124.—
    3.
    Caerētāni, ōrum, m., the inhabitants of Cœre, Val. Max. 1, 1, 1.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Caeretanum

  • 20 Caeretanus

    Caere, n. indecl. ( gen. Caerĭtis. f., Verg. A. 8, 597; abl. Caerēte, id. ib. 10, 183), = Kairê Steph., Kairea Strab., a very ancient city of Etruria, one of the twelve; previously called Agylla, now Cervetri, Plin. 3, 5, 8, § 51; Serv. ad Verg. A. 8, 597; 10, 183; Liv 1, 60, 2.—
    II.
    Derivv.
    A.
    Caeres, ĭtis and ētis, adj., of or pertaining to Cœre, Cœritic:

    populus,

    Liv. 7, 19, 6:

    aquae,

    Val. Max. 1, 6, 9; cf. Liv. 22, 1, 10.—In plur.: Caerĭtes ( Caerētes), um, m., the inhabitants of Cœre, Liv. 7, 19, 8 and 10; 7, 20, 1; 5, 50, 3. In consequence of assisting the Romans in the Gallic war, they received the privilege of Roman citizenship, but without the jus suffragii. Hence the catalogues of such quasi-citizens were called tabulae Caerites or Caeritum, and Roman citizens, in consequence of disfranchisement inflicted by the censor, were enrolled in these, being deprived of the right of voting;

    hence the odious access. idea of the expression in tabulas Caerites (um) referri,

    to be degraded. Ascon. Cic. Div. in Caecil. 3, 8; Gell. 16, 13, 7 sq.—Hence:

    Caerite cerā ( = tabulā) digni,

    Hor. Ep 1, 6, 62 (notā infamiae et omni ignominiā digni sumus, Schol. Crucq.).—
    B.
    Caerētā-nus, a, um, adj., of or belonging to Cœre:

    amnis,

    Plin. 3, 5, 8, § 51.—Subst.
    1.
    Cae-rētānum, i, n., a country-seat near Cœre, Col. 3, 3, 3.—
    2.
    Caerētāna, ōrum, n. (sc. vina), wine from Cœre, Mart. 13, 124.—
    3.
    Caerētāni, ōrum, m., the inhabitants of Cœre, Val. Max. 1, 1, 1.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Caeretanus

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