Translation: from latin

author of the

  • 281 festum

    1.
    festus, a, um, adj. [Sanscr. bhas, shine; lengthened from bha-; Gr. pha-, phainô, v. for; cf. feriae (fes-iae)], orig., of or belonging to the holidays (in opp. to the working-days), solemn, festive, festal, joyful, merry.
    I.
    Lit.
    A.
    Adj. (syn.: sollennis, fastus).
    1.
    With expressions of time:

    festo die si quid prodegeris, profesto egere liceat,

    Plaut. Aul. 2, 8, 10:

    die festo celebri nobilique,

    id. Poen. 3, 5, 13:

    qui (dies) quasi deorum immortalium festi atque sollennes, apud omnes sunt celebrati,

    Cic. Pis. 22, 51:

    Syracusani festos dies anniversarios agunt,

    id. Verr. 2, 4, 48, § 107; id. Q. Fr. 2, 1, 1:

    dies festus ludorum celeberrimus et sanctissimus,

    id. Verr. 2, 4, 67, § 151; id. Fin. 5, 24, 70:

    lux,

    Ov. Tr. 5, 5, 42; Hor. C. 4, 6, 42:

    tempus,

    id. Ep. 2, 1, 140; Juv. 15, 38:

    observare festa sabbata,

    id. 6, 159.—Hence,
    2.
    Transf., of everything relating to holidays:

    chori,

    Ov. Tr. 5, 12, 8:

    clamores,

    Plin. Ep. 2, 17, 24:

    corona,

    Ov. M. 10, 598; cf.

    fronde,

    Verg. A. 4, 459:

    dapes,

    Hor. Epod. 9, 1:

    mensae,

    Sil. 7, 198; Val. Fl. 3, 159:

    lusus,

    Mart. 1, 1:

    pagus,

    Hor. C. 3, 18, 11:

    urbs,

    gay, merry, Sil. 11, 272; 12, 752:

    theatra,

    Ov. M. 3, 111:

    Lares,

    Mart. 3, 58, 23:

    licentiae,

    of the holidays, Quint. 6, 3, 17:

    pax,

    Ov. M. 2, 795; Plin. 14, 1, 1, § 23:

    plebs,

    Tac. A. 2, 69:

    domus ornatu,

    id. ib. 3, 9:

    ritus,

    id. H. 5, 5:

    omina,

    id. A. 5, 4:

    cespes,

    Juv. 12, 2:

    janua,

    id. 12, 91.—As a term of endearment:

    mi animule, mea vita, mea festivitas, meus dies festus, etc.,

    my holiday, Plaut. Cas. 1, 49.—
    B.
    Subst.: festum, i, n., a holiday, festival; a festal banquet, feast ( poet. and late Lat. for dies festus):

    cur igitur Veneris festum Vinalia dicant, Quaeritis?

    Ov. F. 4, 877; 1, 190; id. M. 4, 390:

    forte Jovi festum Phoebus sollenne parabat,

    feast, id. F. 2, 247:

    cum dii omnes ad festum magnae matris convenissent,

    Lact. 1, 21, 25.—In plur.:

    Idaeae festa parentis erunt,

    Ov. F. 4, 182:

    festa venatione absumi,

    Plin. 6, 22, 24, § 91; Ov. M. 4, 33; 10, 431; Hor. Epod. 2, 59; id. Ep. 2, 2, 197; Vulg. Exod. 23, 14 al.; Greg. Mag. Homil. in Evang. 2, 26, 10; Lact. 1, 22, 24.—
    II.
    Meton., public, solemn, festal, festive, joyous (post-Aug. and rare):

    dolor,

    Stat. S. 2, 7, 134:

    festior annus,

    Claud. III. Cons. Hon. 3:

    festissimi dies,

    Vop. Tac. 11:

    aures,

    i. e. gladdened, Claud. B. G. 206 (but in Stat. S. 2, 7, 90 the right read. is fata).
    2.
    Festus, i, m., a Roman surname.
    I.
    Sex. Pompeius Festus, a Roman grammarian of the fourth century A. D., author of a lexicographical work, De verborum significatione, in twenty books, of which only the last nine, in a very imperfect form, remain to us; with an abstract of the whole compiled by Paulus Diaconus in the eighth century. (Edited by Ottfr. Müller.)—
    II.
    Portius Festus, Governor of the Roman Province of Judea, Vulg. Acts, 25, 32 al.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > festum

  • 282 Festus

    1.
    festus, a, um, adj. [Sanscr. bhas, shine; lengthened from bha-; Gr. pha-, phainô, v. for; cf. feriae (fes-iae)], orig., of or belonging to the holidays (in opp. to the working-days), solemn, festive, festal, joyful, merry.
    I.
    Lit.
    A.
    Adj. (syn.: sollennis, fastus).
    1.
    With expressions of time:

    festo die si quid prodegeris, profesto egere liceat,

    Plaut. Aul. 2, 8, 10:

    die festo celebri nobilique,

    id. Poen. 3, 5, 13:

    qui (dies) quasi deorum immortalium festi atque sollennes, apud omnes sunt celebrati,

    Cic. Pis. 22, 51:

    Syracusani festos dies anniversarios agunt,

    id. Verr. 2, 4, 48, § 107; id. Q. Fr. 2, 1, 1:

    dies festus ludorum celeberrimus et sanctissimus,

    id. Verr. 2, 4, 67, § 151; id. Fin. 5, 24, 70:

    lux,

    Ov. Tr. 5, 5, 42; Hor. C. 4, 6, 42:

    tempus,

    id. Ep. 2, 1, 140; Juv. 15, 38:

    observare festa sabbata,

    id. 6, 159.—Hence,
    2.
    Transf., of everything relating to holidays:

    chori,

    Ov. Tr. 5, 12, 8:

    clamores,

    Plin. Ep. 2, 17, 24:

    corona,

    Ov. M. 10, 598; cf.

    fronde,

    Verg. A. 4, 459:

    dapes,

    Hor. Epod. 9, 1:

    mensae,

    Sil. 7, 198; Val. Fl. 3, 159:

    lusus,

    Mart. 1, 1:

    pagus,

    Hor. C. 3, 18, 11:

    urbs,

    gay, merry, Sil. 11, 272; 12, 752:

    theatra,

    Ov. M. 3, 111:

    Lares,

    Mart. 3, 58, 23:

    licentiae,

    of the holidays, Quint. 6, 3, 17:

    pax,

    Ov. M. 2, 795; Plin. 14, 1, 1, § 23:

    plebs,

    Tac. A. 2, 69:

    domus ornatu,

    id. ib. 3, 9:

    ritus,

    id. H. 5, 5:

    omina,

    id. A. 5, 4:

    cespes,

    Juv. 12, 2:

    janua,

    id. 12, 91.—As a term of endearment:

    mi animule, mea vita, mea festivitas, meus dies festus, etc.,

    my holiday, Plaut. Cas. 1, 49.—
    B.
    Subst.: festum, i, n., a holiday, festival; a festal banquet, feast ( poet. and late Lat. for dies festus):

    cur igitur Veneris festum Vinalia dicant, Quaeritis?

    Ov. F. 4, 877; 1, 190; id. M. 4, 390:

    forte Jovi festum Phoebus sollenne parabat,

    feast, id. F. 2, 247:

    cum dii omnes ad festum magnae matris convenissent,

    Lact. 1, 21, 25.—In plur.:

    Idaeae festa parentis erunt,

    Ov. F. 4, 182:

    festa venatione absumi,

    Plin. 6, 22, 24, § 91; Ov. M. 4, 33; 10, 431; Hor. Epod. 2, 59; id. Ep. 2, 2, 197; Vulg. Exod. 23, 14 al.; Greg. Mag. Homil. in Evang. 2, 26, 10; Lact. 1, 22, 24.—
    II.
    Meton., public, solemn, festal, festive, joyous (post-Aug. and rare):

    dolor,

    Stat. S. 2, 7, 134:

    festior annus,

    Claud. III. Cons. Hon. 3:

    festissimi dies,

    Vop. Tac. 11:

    aures,

    i. e. gladdened, Claud. B. G. 206 (but in Stat. S. 2, 7, 90 the right read. is fata).
    2.
    Festus, i, m., a Roman surname.
    I.
    Sex. Pompeius Festus, a Roman grammarian of the fourth century A. D., author of a lexicographical work, De verborum significatione, in twenty books, of which only the last nine, in a very imperfect form, remain to us; with an abstract of the whole compiled by Paulus Diaconus in the eighth century. (Edited by Ottfr. Müller.)—
    II.
    Portius Festus, Governor of the Roman Province of Judea, Vulg. Acts, 25, 32 al.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Festus

  • 283 Firmicus

    Firmĭcus, i, m., Julius F. Maternus, a Roman mathematician in the time of Constantine the Great, author of a work entitled Matheseos libri octo; cf. Bernhardy, Rom. Lit. pp. 645, 648.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Firmicus

  • 284 Frontinus

    Frontīnus, i, m., a Roman surname. So esp., Sex. Julius Frontinus, superintendent of the Roman aqueducts under Nerva, in the latter half of the first century of the Christian era; author of the works De Aquis Urbis Romae, Strategetica, De Agrorum Qualitate, and De Limitibus Agrorum, Tac. H. 4, 39; id. Agr. 17; Mart. 10, 48, 20; Plin. Ep. 4, 8, 3; 5, 1, 5; 9, 19, 1; v. Teuffel, Röm. Lit. § 322.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Frontinus

  • 285 Gaia

    Gāĭus (less correctly Cāĭus;

    trisyl.,

    Cat. 10, 30; Mart. 9, 22, 12; 11, 36, 8); gen. Gāi (voc. Gāi, Mart. 10, 16, 1), m., and Gāĭa, ae, f. [for Gavius; from gaudeo], a Roman prœnomen, usu. written C.; v. the letter G. Gaia was written O, Quint. 1, 7, 28; Vel. Long. p. 2218; P. prol. p. 1502.— At marriage festivals it was customary to call the bridegroom and bride Gaius and Gaia, Fest. s. v. Gaia, p. 71; Quint. l. l.; Cic. Mur. 12 fin.
    II.
    In partic.
    A.
    An eminent jurist who lived about A.D. 110-180, author of the Institutionum Commentarii IV., which contain a systematic summary of the Roman law of family relations, of private property, and of actions; and which for generations was a standard educational work on the subject. This work was known, however, to modern scholars only by the fragments preserved in the Pandects, etc., until in 1816 Niebuhr discovered in the Chapter House of Verona a nearly complete MS. of the original work of Gaius, over which works of St. Jerome had been written. Teuffel, Gesch. d. Röm. Lit. p. 812 sqq.—
    B.
    In post-Aug. historians, esp., the emperor Gaius Caligula; hence, Gāiānus or Cāiānus, a, um, adj., of or belonging to Caligula:

    custodia,

    Sen. Tranq. 11:

    clades,

    id. ib. 14 fin.:

    expeditiones,

    Tac. 4, 15:

    nex,

    Suet. Tit. 1:

    as (because lowered in value by him),

    Stat. Sil. 4, 9, 22.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Gaia

  • 286 Gaianus

    Gāĭus (less correctly Cāĭus;

    trisyl.,

    Cat. 10, 30; Mart. 9, 22, 12; 11, 36, 8); gen. Gāi (voc. Gāi, Mart. 10, 16, 1), m., and Gāĭa, ae, f. [for Gavius; from gaudeo], a Roman prœnomen, usu. written C.; v. the letter G. Gaia was written O, Quint. 1, 7, 28; Vel. Long. p. 2218; P. prol. p. 1502.— At marriage festivals it was customary to call the bridegroom and bride Gaius and Gaia, Fest. s. v. Gaia, p. 71; Quint. l. l.; Cic. Mur. 12 fin.
    II.
    In partic.
    A.
    An eminent jurist who lived about A.D. 110-180, author of the Institutionum Commentarii IV., which contain a systematic summary of the Roman law of family relations, of private property, and of actions; and which for generations was a standard educational work on the subject. This work was known, however, to modern scholars only by the fragments preserved in the Pandects, etc., until in 1816 Niebuhr discovered in the Chapter House of Verona a nearly complete MS. of the original work of Gaius, over which works of St. Jerome had been written. Teuffel, Gesch. d. Röm. Lit. p. 812 sqq.—
    B.
    In post-Aug. historians, esp., the emperor Gaius Caligula; hence, Gāiānus or Cāiānus, a, um, adj., of or belonging to Caligula:

    custodia,

    Sen. Tranq. 11:

    clades,

    id. ib. 14 fin.:

    expeditiones,

    Tac. 4, 15:

    nex,

    Suet. Tit. 1:

    as (because lowered in value by him),

    Stat. Sil. 4, 9, 22.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Gaianus

  • 287 Gaius

    Gāĭus (less correctly Cāĭus;

    trisyl.,

    Cat. 10, 30; Mart. 9, 22, 12; 11, 36, 8); gen. Gāi (voc. Gāi, Mart. 10, 16, 1), m., and Gāĭa, ae, f. [for Gavius; from gaudeo], a Roman prœnomen, usu. written C.; v. the letter G. Gaia was written O, Quint. 1, 7, 28; Vel. Long. p. 2218; P. prol. p. 1502.— At marriage festivals it was customary to call the bridegroom and bride Gaius and Gaia, Fest. s. v. Gaia, p. 71; Quint. l. l.; Cic. Mur. 12 fin.
    II.
    In partic.
    A.
    An eminent jurist who lived about A.D. 110-180, author of the Institutionum Commentarii IV., which contain a systematic summary of the Roman law of family relations, of private property, and of actions; and which for generations was a standard educational work on the subject. This work was known, however, to modern scholars only by the fragments preserved in the Pandects, etc., until in 1816 Niebuhr discovered in the Chapter House of Verona a nearly complete MS. of the original work of Gaius, over which works of St. Jerome had been written. Teuffel, Gesch. d. Röm. Lit. p. 812 sqq.—
    B.
    In post-Aug. historians, esp., the emperor Gaius Caligula; hence, Gāiānus or Cāiānus, a, um, adj., of or belonging to Caligula:

    custodia,

    Sen. Tranq. 11:

    clades,

    id. ib. 14 fin.:

    expeditiones,

    Tac. 4, 15:

    nex,

    Suet. Tit. 1:

    as (because lowered in value by him),

    Stat. Sil. 4, 9, 22.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Gaius

  • 288 Gargilianus

    1.
    Gargilius, a famous hunter, Hor. Ep. 1, 6, 58.—
    2.
    Gargilius Martialis, a Roman author of the third century of our era.
    II.
    Deriv.: Gargĭlĭānus, a, um, adj., of or belonging to a Gargilius, Gargilian:

    fundus,

    Dig. 32, 1, 41, § 3.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Gargilianus

  • 289 Gargilius

    1.
    Gargilius, a famous hunter, Hor. Ep. 1, 6, 58.—
    2.
    Gargilius Martialis, a Roman author of the third century of our era.
    II.
    Deriv.: Gargĭlĭānus, a, um, adj., of or belonging to a Gargilius, Gargilian:

    fundus,

    Dig. 32, 1, 41, § 3.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Gargilius

  • 290 Gellianus

    Gellĭus, a, name of a Roman gens;

    so the historians, Gelii,

    Cic. Div. 1, 26, 55; id. Leg. 1, 2, 6:

    L. Gellius,

    a friend of Cicero, id. ib. 1, 20, 53; id. Balb. 8, 19; 14, 33; and esp.: Aulus Gellius (on account of the abbreviation A. Gellius, formerly falsely called Agellius), a grammarian of the first half of the second century of the Christian era, author of the Noctes Atticae: vir elegantissimi eloquii et multae ac facundae scientiae (Gellius), Aug. Civ. Dei, 9, 4.—
    II.
    Deriv.: Gellĭānus, i, m., a slave of one Gellius, Labeo ap. Gell. 13, 12, 4.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Gellianus

  • 291 Gellius

    Gellĭus, a, name of a Roman gens;

    so the historians, Gelii,

    Cic. Div. 1, 26, 55; id. Leg. 1, 2, 6:

    L. Gellius,

    a friend of Cicero, id. ib. 1, 20, 53; id. Balb. 8, 19; 14, 33; and esp.: Aulus Gellius (on account of the abbreviation A. Gellius, formerly falsely called Agellius), a grammarian of the first half of the second century of the Christian era, author of the Noctes Atticae: vir elegantissimi eloquii et multae ac facundae scientiae (Gellius), Aug. Civ. Dei, 9, 4.—
    II.
    Deriv.: Gellĭānus, i, m., a slave of one Gellius, Labeo ap. Gell. 13, 12, 4.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Gellius

  • 292 genealogus

    gĕnĕālŏgus, i, m., = genealogos, a genealogist:

    qui (dii) genealogis antiquis sic nominantur,

    Cic. N. D. 3, 17, 44. So of Moses, as the author of Genesis:

    illud ait genealogus idem,

    Prud. Apoth. 315.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > genealogus

  • 293 Gorgias

    Gorgĭas, ae, m., = Gorgias.
    I.
    A famous Greek sophist of Leontini, a contemporary of Socrates, Cic. Inv. 1, 5, 7; id. Fin. 2, 1, 1; id. de Or. 1, 22, 103; id. Brut. 8, 30; id. Or. 12, 39 et saep.—
    II. III.
    A sculptor of Sparta, Plin. 34, 8, 19, § 49.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Gorgias

  • 294 Gratius

    1.
    Gratius, ii, m., the opponent of the poet Archias, Cic. Arch. 4, 8; 6, 12.—
    2.
    Gratius Faliscus, a contemporary of Ovid, author of a poem on hunting, Cynegeticon, Ov. P. 4, 16, 34.—
    II.
    Deriv.: Grātĭānus, a, um, adj., of or belonging to a Gratius, Gratian:

    vasa ex argento,

    Plin. 33, 11, 49, § 139.— Subst.: Grātiānus, i, m., son and co-regent of the emperor Valentinian I., from 367 to 383 A. D.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Gratius

  • 295 hallucinatio

    ālūcĭnātĭo ( all- or hall-), ōnis, f. [alucinor], a wandering of mind, dreaminess, revery (acc. to Non. 121, 20, used even by the old writers (veteres);

    but, except in the passage quoted by him from an author not named, it is found only in the foll. exs.),

    Sen. Vit. Beat. 26; Arn. 4, p. 152, and 6, p. 194.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > hallucinatio

  • 296 Hirtius

    Hirtĭus, a, name of a Roman gens.; in partic., A. Hirtius, consul A. U. C. 711, and author of the eighth book of Cœsar's Commentaries on the Gallic war: he fell before Mutina, Cic. Att. 7, 4, 2; Q. Cic. ap. Cic. Fam. 16, 27, 1.— Hirtīnus, a, um, of Hirtius: proelium, the battle in which Hirtius met his death, Asin. Pollio ap. Cic. Fam. 10, 33, 4.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Hirtius

  • 297 historice

    1.
    histŏrĭcē, adv., v. historicus fin.
    2.
    histŏrĭcē, ēs, f., = historikê, explanation, interpretation of an author: finitae quidem sunt partes duae, quas haec professio pollicetur, id est ratio loquendi et enarratio auctorum:

    quarum illam methodicen, hanc historicen vocant,

    Quint. 1, 9, 1.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > historice

  • 298 humile

    hŭmĭlis, e, adj. [humus; like chamalos from chamai, on the ground, i. e.], low, lowly, small, slight (class.; esp. freq. in the trop. signif.).
    I.
    Lit.:

    arbores et vites et ea quae sunt humiliora neque se tollere a terra altius possunt,

    Cic. Tusc. 5, 13, 37; cf.:

    turrim humilem parvamque fecerant,

    Caes. B. C. 2, 8, 1 sq.:

    humilior munitio,

    id. ib. 3, 63, 2:

    (naves) humiliores quam quibus in nostro mari uti consuevimus,

    id. B. G. 5, 1, 2:

    humiles habitare casas,

    Verg. E. 2, 29:

    domus,

    Hor. C. 3, 1, 22:

    postes,

    Ov. M. 8, 639:

    arcus,

    id. ib. 3, 30:

    arae,

    Val. Fl. 3, 426:

    virgas humilis mordere salicti,

    Juv. 11, 67:

    Forentum,

    low, situated in the plain, Hor. C. 3, 4, 16; so,

    Myconos,

    Ov. M. 7, 463:

    Italia,

    Verg. A. 3, 522:

    humillimo solo aqua diutissime immorata,

    Just. 2, 1 med.:

    avi similis, quae circum litora, circum Piscosos scopulos humilis volat aequora juxta,

    flies low, Verg. A. 4, 255; cf.:

    decisis humilis pennis,

    Hor. Ep. 2, 2, 50:

    potest ex deformi humilique corpusculo exire formosus animus ac magnus,

    small, diminutive, Sen. Ep. 66:

    brevi atque humili corpore homines,

    Gell. 19, 13, 3; Curt. 7, 4:

    humiles Cleonae,

    little, petty, Ov. M. 6, 417 (in Ptolem. polis ou megalê):

    Troja,

    id. ib. 15, 424:

    ipse humili designat moenia fossa,

    i. e. slight, shallow, Verg. A. 7, 157; so,

    fossa,

    Tac. A. 1, 61; cf.

    radix,

    Plin. Ep. 8, 20, 5.
    II.
    Trop.
    A.
    As respects rank, birth, fortune, worth, consideration, etc., low, base, mean, humble, obscure, poor, needy, insignificant (cf.:

    supplex, summissus, demissus, abjectus): ut si parentibus nati sint humilibus,

    Cic. Lael. 17, 90:

    humiles nati (shortly after: trivio conceptus et educatus stercore),

    Phaedr. 1, 27, 2: humiles et obscuri homines, Cic. Div. 1, 40, 88; id. Quint. 31, 95:

    humillimus homo de plebe,

    Liv. 3, 19, 9; cf.:

    humilis in plebe et ideo ignobilis puerpera,

    Plin. 7, 36, 36, § 121:

    ne latos fines parare studeant potentioresque humiliores possessionibus expellant,

    Caes. B. G. 6, 22, 3:

    humiliores, opp. opulentiores,

    Hirt. B. G. 8, 51 fin.:

    hos Suevi vectigales sibi fecerunt ac multo humiliores infirmioresque redegerunt,

    Caes. B. G. 4, 3 fin.: homines humiles, opp. amplissimi viri, Balb. et Opp. ap. Cic. Att. 9, 8, A, 1:

    satis superque humilis est, qui, etc.,

    Liv. 3, 53, 9:

    junge tuis humiles, ambitiose, manus,

    of the servants, Ov. A. A. 2, 254:

    civitas ignobilis atque humilis,

    Caes. B. G. 5, 28, 1:

    humilem sane relinquunt et minime generosum, ut ita dicam, ortum amicitiae,

    Cic. Lael. 9, 29:

    Viridomarus, quem Caesar ex humili loco ad summam dignitatem perduxerat,

    Caes. B. G. 7, 39, 1:

    qui cogitationes suas abjecerunt in rem tam humilem atque contemptam,

    Cic. Lael. 9, 32; cf.:

    nihil abjectum, nihil humile cogitant,

    id. Fin. 5, 20, 57:

    aut nulla aut humili aliqua arte praediti,

    id. Arch. 5, 10:

    humiles et sordidae curae,

    Plin. Ep. 1, 3, 3:

    rei pictor,

    Plin. 35, 10, 37, § 120 (dub.;

    Jan. floridissimus): humilis atque obsoletus vestitus,

    Nep. Ages. 8:

    agna,

    poor, humble, Hor. C. 2, 17, 32:

    fortuna,

    Juv. 6, 287:

    domus,

    id. 11, 171.—Hence, subst.: hŭmĭle, is, n., that which is humble or base, a low station:

    ex humili potens,

    Hor. C. 3, 30, 12:

    quales ex humili magna ad vestigia rerum extollit Fortuna,

    Juv. 3, 39.—

    Prov.: Humiles laborant ubi potentes dissident,

    Phaedr. 1, 30, 1.—
    2.
    Of low, mean language: iambus frequentissimus est in iis, quae demisso atque humili sermone dicuntur. Cic. Or. 58, 196:

    sermo,

    Hor. A. P. 229; cf.:

    neque humilem et abjectam orationem nec nimis altam et exaggeratam probat,

    Cic. Or. 57, 192:

    verbum,

    id. Brut. 79, 274:

    humilia et vulgaria verba,

    Quint. 10, 1, 9:

    translatio,

    id. 8, 6, 5:

    si quis sublimia humilibus misceat,

    id. 8, 3, 60:

    quae humilia circa res magnas, apta circa minores videntur,

    id. 8, 3, 18:

    humile et quotidianum sermonis genus,

    id. 11, 1, 6:

    of the author himself: Macer... humilis,

    i. e. commonplace, id. 10, 1, 87:

    nil parvum aut humili modo, Nil mortale loquar,

    Hor. C. 3, 25, 17.—
    B.
    Of mind or character, low, mean, base, abject:

    qui umquam apparitor tam humilis? tam abjectus?

    Cic. Phil. 2, 32, 82:

    ut ille tum humilis, ut demissus erat!

    id. Att. 2, 21, 3:

    humillimus assentator,

    Vell. 2, 83, 1:

    neque nos simus tam humiles, ut quae laudamus inutilia credamus,

    Quint. 11, 1, 13:

    privata deduci superbo Non humilis mulier triumpho,

    Hor. C. 1, 37, 32:

    succumbere doloribus eosque humili animo imbecilloque ferre miserum est,

    Cic. Fin. 1, 15, 49:

    animi,

    Lucr. 6, 52:

    si prece et obsecratione humili ac supplici utemur,

    Cic. Inv. 1, 16, 22; 1, 56 init.; cf.:

    fracto animo, atque humili aliquem supplicare,

    id. Planc. 20, 50:

    humillimae preces, Suet. Vit. Luc.: pavor,

    Verg. G. 1, 331; cf.

    metus,

    Val. Fl. 3, 394.—Hence, adv.: hŭmĭlĭter, low, deeply.
    1.
    Lit. (so post-Aug. and very rare):

    in loco clivoso humilius rami arborum servandisunt, in plano altius,

    Pall. 3, 13, 3:

    eadem facta claritate vel obscuritate facientium vel tolluntur altissime vel humillime deprimuntur,

    very deeply, Plin. Ep. 6, 24, 1. —
    2.
    Trop. (acc. to II. B.), basely, meanly, abjectly, humbly (class.):

    non est ausus elate et ample loqui, cum humiliter demisseque sentiret,

    Cic. Tusc. 5, 9, 24:

    aut servit humiliter, aut superbe dominatur,

    Liv. 24, 25, 8:

    servire alicui,

    id. 45, 32, 5:

    audacter territas, humiliter placas,

    Auct. Her. 4, 20, 28:

    animose paupertatem ferre, humiliter infamiam,

    Sen. Ep. 120 med.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > humile

  • 299 humilis

    hŭmĭlis, e, adj. [humus; like chamalos from chamai, on the ground, i. e.], low, lowly, small, slight (class.; esp. freq. in the trop. signif.).
    I.
    Lit.:

    arbores et vites et ea quae sunt humiliora neque se tollere a terra altius possunt,

    Cic. Tusc. 5, 13, 37; cf.:

    turrim humilem parvamque fecerant,

    Caes. B. C. 2, 8, 1 sq.:

    humilior munitio,

    id. ib. 3, 63, 2:

    (naves) humiliores quam quibus in nostro mari uti consuevimus,

    id. B. G. 5, 1, 2:

    humiles habitare casas,

    Verg. E. 2, 29:

    domus,

    Hor. C. 3, 1, 22:

    postes,

    Ov. M. 8, 639:

    arcus,

    id. ib. 3, 30:

    arae,

    Val. Fl. 3, 426:

    virgas humilis mordere salicti,

    Juv. 11, 67:

    Forentum,

    low, situated in the plain, Hor. C. 3, 4, 16; so,

    Myconos,

    Ov. M. 7, 463:

    Italia,

    Verg. A. 3, 522:

    humillimo solo aqua diutissime immorata,

    Just. 2, 1 med.:

    avi similis, quae circum litora, circum Piscosos scopulos humilis volat aequora juxta,

    flies low, Verg. A. 4, 255; cf.:

    decisis humilis pennis,

    Hor. Ep. 2, 2, 50:

    potest ex deformi humilique corpusculo exire formosus animus ac magnus,

    small, diminutive, Sen. Ep. 66:

    brevi atque humili corpore homines,

    Gell. 19, 13, 3; Curt. 7, 4:

    humiles Cleonae,

    little, petty, Ov. M. 6, 417 (in Ptolem. polis ou megalê):

    Troja,

    id. ib. 15, 424:

    ipse humili designat moenia fossa,

    i. e. slight, shallow, Verg. A. 7, 157; so,

    fossa,

    Tac. A. 1, 61; cf.

    radix,

    Plin. Ep. 8, 20, 5.
    II.
    Trop.
    A.
    As respects rank, birth, fortune, worth, consideration, etc., low, base, mean, humble, obscure, poor, needy, insignificant (cf.:

    supplex, summissus, demissus, abjectus): ut si parentibus nati sint humilibus,

    Cic. Lael. 17, 90:

    humiles nati (shortly after: trivio conceptus et educatus stercore),

    Phaedr. 1, 27, 2: humiles et obscuri homines, Cic. Div. 1, 40, 88; id. Quint. 31, 95:

    humillimus homo de plebe,

    Liv. 3, 19, 9; cf.:

    humilis in plebe et ideo ignobilis puerpera,

    Plin. 7, 36, 36, § 121:

    ne latos fines parare studeant potentioresque humiliores possessionibus expellant,

    Caes. B. G. 6, 22, 3:

    humiliores, opp. opulentiores,

    Hirt. B. G. 8, 51 fin.:

    hos Suevi vectigales sibi fecerunt ac multo humiliores infirmioresque redegerunt,

    Caes. B. G. 4, 3 fin.: homines humiles, opp. amplissimi viri, Balb. et Opp. ap. Cic. Att. 9, 8, A, 1:

    satis superque humilis est, qui, etc.,

    Liv. 3, 53, 9:

    junge tuis humiles, ambitiose, manus,

    of the servants, Ov. A. A. 2, 254:

    civitas ignobilis atque humilis,

    Caes. B. G. 5, 28, 1:

    humilem sane relinquunt et minime generosum, ut ita dicam, ortum amicitiae,

    Cic. Lael. 9, 29:

    Viridomarus, quem Caesar ex humili loco ad summam dignitatem perduxerat,

    Caes. B. G. 7, 39, 1:

    qui cogitationes suas abjecerunt in rem tam humilem atque contemptam,

    Cic. Lael. 9, 32; cf.:

    nihil abjectum, nihil humile cogitant,

    id. Fin. 5, 20, 57:

    aut nulla aut humili aliqua arte praediti,

    id. Arch. 5, 10:

    humiles et sordidae curae,

    Plin. Ep. 1, 3, 3:

    rei pictor,

    Plin. 35, 10, 37, § 120 (dub.;

    Jan. floridissimus): humilis atque obsoletus vestitus,

    Nep. Ages. 8:

    agna,

    poor, humble, Hor. C. 2, 17, 32:

    fortuna,

    Juv. 6, 287:

    domus,

    id. 11, 171.—Hence, subst.: hŭmĭle, is, n., that which is humble or base, a low station:

    ex humili potens,

    Hor. C. 3, 30, 12:

    quales ex humili magna ad vestigia rerum extollit Fortuna,

    Juv. 3, 39.—

    Prov.: Humiles laborant ubi potentes dissident,

    Phaedr. 1, 30, 1.—
    2.
    Of low, mean language: iambus frequentissimus est in iis, quae demisso atque humili sermone dicuntur. Cic. Or. 58, 196:

    sermo,

    Hor. A. P. 229; cf.:

    neque humilem et abjectam orationem nec nimis altam et exaggeratam probat,

    Cic. Or. 57, 192:

    verbum,

    id. Brut. 79, 274:

    humilia et vulgaria verba,

    Quint. 10, 1, 9:

    translatio,

    id. 8, 6, 5:

    si quis sublimia humilibus misceat,

    id. 8, 3, 60:

    quae humilia circa res magnas, apta circa minores videntur,

    id. 8, 3, 18:

    humile et quotidianum sermonis genus,

    id. 11, 1, 6:

    of the author himself: Macer... humilis,

    i. e. commonplace, id. 10, 1, 87:

    nil parvum aut humili modo, Nil mortale loquar,

    Hor. C. 3, 25, 17.—
    B.
    Of mind or character, low, mean, base, abject:

    qui umquam apparitor tam humilis? tam abjectus?

    Cic. Phil. 2, 32, 82:

    ut ille tum humilis, ut demissus erat!

    id. Att. 2, 21, 3:

    humillimus assentator,

    Vell. 2, 83, 1:

    neque nos simus tam humiles, ut quae laudamus inutilia credamus,

    Quint. 11, 1, 13:

    privata deduci superbo Non humilis mulier triumpho,

    Hor. C. 1, 37, 32:

    succumbere doloribus eosque humili animo imbecilloque ferre miserum est,

    Cic. Fin. 1, 15, 49:

    animi,

    Lucr. 6, 52:

    si prece et obsecratione humili ac supplici utemur,

    Cic. Inv. 1, 16, 22; 1, 56 init.; cf.:

    fracto animo, atque humili aliquem supplicare,

    id. Planc. 20, 50:

    humillimae preces, Suet. Vit. Luc.: pavor,

    Verg. G. 1, 331; cf.

    metus,

    Val. Fl. 3, 394.—Hence, adv.: hŭmĭlĭter, low, deeply.
    1.
    Lit. (so post-Aug. and very rare):

    in loco clivoso humilius rami arborum servandisunt, in plano altius,

    Pall. 3, 13, 3:

    eadem facta claritate vel obscuritate facientium vel tolluntur altissime vel humillime deprimuntur,

    very deeply, Plin. Ep. 6, 24, 1. —
    2.
    Trop. (acc. to II. B.), basely, meanly, abjectly, humbly (class.):

    non est ausus elate et ample loqui, cum humiliter demisseque sentiret,

    Cic. Tusc. 5, 9, 24:

    aut servit humiliter, aut superbe dominatur,

    Liv. 24, 25, 8:

    servire alicui,

    id. 45, 32, 5:

    audacter territas, humiliter placas,

    Auct. Her. 4, 20, 28:

    animose paupertatem ferre, humiliter infamiam,

    Sen. Ep. 120 med.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > humilis

  • 300 Hyginus

    Hygīnus (Higinus, Gell. 1, 14, 1; 1, 21, 2; 5, 8, 1 et saep.), i, m., surname of two Roman authors.
    I.
    C. Julius Hyginus, author of a collection of fables and of a treatise on astronomy, Suet. Gramm. 20; Gell. 1, 14.—
    II.
    The author of a treatise De limitibus constituendis.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Hyginus

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