Translation: from latin to english

from english to latin

apple

  • 41 Melo

    1.
    Mēlo, ōnis, m., old Latin name for the Nile: Melo nomine alio Nilus vocatur, Paul. ex Fest. p. 124 Müll.; cf. id. p. 7 and p. 18; Serv. Verg. G. 4, 291:

    Melonis alba filia,

    i. e. the paper-reed growing in the Nile, Aus. Epist. 4, 75.
    2.
    mēlo, ōnis, m., = mêlon, an apple-shaped melon, for melopepo, Pall. 4, 9, 6; Vop. Carin. 17.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Melo

  • 42 melopepo

    mēlŏpĕpo, ōnis, m., = mêlopepôn, an apple-shaped melon, cucumber-melon, not eaten till fully ripe, Plin. 19, 5, 23, § 67.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > melopepo

  • 43 ocellus

    ŏcellus, i, m. dim. [oculus], a little eye, eyelet (mostly poet.).
    I.
    Lit.:

    blanda quies furtim vietis obrepsit ocellis,

    Ov. F. 3, 19:

    ut in ocellis hilaritudo est!

    Plaut. Rud. 2, 4, 8:

    turgiduli,

    Cat. 3, 17:

    ebrii,

    id. 43, 11:

    irati,

    Ov. Am. 2, 8, 15:

    acre malum semper stillantis ocelli,

    Juv. 6, 109:

    si prurit frictus ocelli angulus,

    id. 6, 578.—As a term of endearment:

    ocelle mi!

    my little eye! my darling! Plaut. Trin. 2, 1, 18:

    aureus,

    id. As. 3, 3, 101: jucundissimus meus, Aug. ap. Gell. 15, 7, 3:

    cave despuas, ocelle,

    Cat. 50, 19.—So of things, like our apple of the eye:

    cur ocellos Italiae, villulas meas, non vides?

    Cic. Att. 16, 6, 2:

    insularum,

    Cat. 31, 1.—
    II.
    Transf., a bulb or knob on the roots of the reed (called also oculus), Plin. 21, 4, 10, § 20.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > ocellus

  • 44 oculus

    ŏcŭlus (sync. oclus, Prud. steph. 10, 592 dub.), i, m. [kindr. with Sanscr. akshi and aksha, from the root ītsh, videre; Gr. ossomai, osse; Goth. augō; Germ. Auge; Engl. eye], an eye.
    I.
    Lit.:

    quae (natura) primum oculos membranis tenuissimis vestivit et saepsit... sed lubricos oculos fecit et mobiles,

    Cic. N. D. 2, 57, 142; cf. Cels. 7, 7, 13; Plin. 11, 37, 52, § 139 sq.; Cic. de Or. 3, 59, 221:

    venusti,

    id. Tusc. 5, 16, 46:

    eminentes,

    prominent, id. Vatin. 2, 4:

    oculi tanquam speculatores,

    id. N. D. 2, 57, 140:

    acuti,

    id. Planc. 27, 69:

    maligni,

    Verg. A. 5, 654:

    minaces,

    Luc. 2, 26: oculos conicere in aliquem, to cast or fix one's eyes upon, Cic. Clu. 19, 54:

    oculos conjecit in hostem,

    Verg. A. 12, 483: adicere alicui rei, to cast one's eyes upon, glance at:

    ad eorum ne quem oculos adiciat suos,

    Plaut. As. 4, 1, 24; to covet, Cic. Verr. 2, 2, 15, § 37:

    adicere ad rem aliquam,

    id. Agr. 2, 10, 25:

    de aliquo nusquam deicere,

    to never turn one's eyes away from, to regard with fixed attention, id. Verr. 2, 4, 15, § 33:

    deicere ab aliquā re,

    to turn away, id. Phil. 1, 1, 1:

    in terram figere,

    to fix one's eyes upon the ground, Tac. H. 4, 72:

    deicere in terram,

    to cast down to, Quint. 1, 11, 9:

    demittere,

    Ov. M. 15, 612:

    erigere,

    id. ib. 4, 146: attollere. Verg. A. 4, 688; Ov. M. 2, 448:

    circumferre,

    id. ib. 6, 169:

    premere,

    Verg. A. 9, 487: deponere, to fix, Hor C. 1, 36, 18:

    distorquere,

    id. S. 1, 9, 65:

    spargere,

    to direct hither and thither, Pers. 5, 33:

    oculis cernere,

    to see with one's own eyes, Nep. Timol. 2, 2:

    oculos auferre spectanti,

    to blind the eyes of an observer, to cheat him before his eyes, Liv. 6, 15 fin.: ponere sibi aliquid ante oculos. i. e. to imagine to one's self any thing, Cic. Agr. 2, 20, 53:

    proponere oculis suis aliquid,

    id. Sest. 7, 17:

    esse ante oculos,

    to be before one's eyes, id. Lael. 11, 38: res posita in oculis, and ante oculos, that lies before one's eyes, is apparent, evident:

    de rebus ante oculos positis,

    id. Ac. 1, 2, 5:

    omnia sunt enim posita ante oculos,

    id. de Or. 1, 43, 192:

    inque meis oculis candida Delos erat,

    before my eyes, Ov. H. 21, 82: vivere in oculis, habitare in oculis, to live in the sight of, in the presence of, in intercourse with:

    in maximā celebritate atque in oculis civium quondam viximus,

    Cic. Off. 3, 1, 3:

    habitavi in oculis,

    id. Planc. 27, 66; cf.:

    in foro palam Syracusis in ore atque in oculis provinciae,

    id. Verr. 2, 2, 33, § 81; Liv. 22, 12; 35, 10; Tac. H. 4, 77:

    habere in oculis,

    to keep in sight, to watch, observe, Plaut. Ps. 3, 2, 66:

    in oculis omnium submergi,

    Curt. 9, 4, 11:

    se ante oculos suos trucidari sinerent,

    Liv. 2, 6, 2; 4, 14, 5; Auct. Her. 4, 36, 48: ab oculis alicujus abire (ire), to leave one's presence:

    Abin' hinc ab oculis?

    Plaut. Trin. 4, 2, 147; id. Truc. 2, 5, 24; Sen. Ep. 36, 10; cf.:

    ab oculis recedere,

    Plin. Ep. 2, 1, 11:

    ab oculis concedere,

    Cic. Cat. 1, 7, 17:

    (angues) conspecti repente ex oculis abierunt,

    out of sight, Liv. 25, 16, 2:

    prodigii species ex oculis elapsa,

    id. 26, 19, 7:

    (avem) ablatam ex oculis,

    Tac. H. 2, 50:

    facesserent propere ex urbe ab ore atque oculis populi Romani,

    Liv. 6, 17, 8:

    sub oculis alicujus,

    before a person's eyes, in his presence, Caes. B. C. 1, 71; Vell. 2, 79, 4:

    sub oculis domini esse,

    Col. 9, 5, 2:

    quos honores sub oculis tuis gessit,

    Plin. Ep. 10, 11, 2:

    sub avi oculis necari,

    Just. 1, 4, 5; Flor. 4, 7, 8:

    hostes sub oculis erant,

    Liv. 22, 14, 3; 26, 38, 9:

    sub oculis Caesaris,

    Tac. A. 2, 35: hunc oculis suis nostrarum numquam quisquam vidit, with his own eyes, i. e. actually, in person, Ter. Eun. 4, 4, 10:

    numquam ante hunc diem meis oculis eam videram,

    id. Hec. 5, 4, 23: ad oculum, for display, to be seen:

    non ad oculum servientes,

    Vulg. Eph. 1, 18; id. Col. 3, 22.—As a term of endearment, the apple of my eye, my darling:

    ubi isti sunt quibus vos oculi estis, quibus vitae estis, quibus deliciae?

    Plaut. Ps. 1, 2, 46:

    bene vale, ocule mi!

    id. Curc. 1, 3, 47 —Hence, in a double sense:

    par oculorum in amicitiā M. Antonii triumviri,

    Suet. Rhet. 5.—The ancients swore by their eyes:

    si voltis per oculos jurare, nihilo magis facietis,

    Plaut. Men. 5, 9, 1.—
    B.
    Transf.
    1.
    The power of seeing, sight, vision: ut eum quoque oculum, quo bene videret, amitteret, lost, i. e. became blind, Cic. Div. 1, 24, 48:

    oculos perdere,

    id. Har. Resp. 18, 37:

    restituere alicui,

    Suet. Vesp. 7; cf.:

    oculis usurpare rem,

    i. e. see, Lucr. 1, 301.—
    2.
    A luminary, said of the sun and stars ( poet. and in post-Aug. prose): mundi oculus. i. e. the sun, Ov. M. 4, 228:

    stellarum oculi,

    Plin. 2, 5, 4, § 10.—
    3.
    A spot resembling an eye, as on a panther's hide, a peacock's tail, etc., Plin. 8, 17, 23, § 62:

    pavonum caudae,

    id. 13, 15, 30, § 96. —So arch. t. t.:

    oculus volutae,

    Vitr. 3, 5. —
    4.
    Of plants.
    a.
    An eye, bud, bourgeon: oculos imponere, i. e. to bud, inoculate, Verg. G. 2, 73:

    gemmans,

    Col. 4, 24, 16.—
    b.
    A bulb or knob on many roots, on the reed, etc.:

    harundinis,

    Cato, R. R. 6, 3; Varr. R. R. 1, 24, 3:

    seritur harundo bulbo radicis, quem alii oculum vocant,

    Plin. 17, 20, 33, § 144.—
    c.
    A plant, called also aizoum majus, Plin. 25, 13, 102, § 160. —
    II.
    Trop.
    A.
    A principal ornament: hi duo illos oculos orae maritimae effoderunt ( Corinth and Carthage), Cic. N. D. 3, 38, 91:

    ex duobus Graeciae oculis,

    i. e. Athens and Sparta, Just. 5, 8, 4.—
    B.
    The eye of the soul, the mind's eye:

    eloquentiam quam nullis nisi mentis oculis videre possumus,

    Cic. Or. 29, 101:

    acrioribus mentis oculis intueri,

    Col. 3, 8, 1:

    oculos pascere re aliquā,

    to feast one's eyes on any thing, Cic. Verr. 2, 5, 26, § 65; cf.:

    concupiscentia oculorum,

    Vulg. 1 Joh. 2, 16: fructum oculis (dat.) capere ex aliquā re, Nep. Eum. 11, 2: oculi dolent, the eyes ache, i. e. one is afflicted by something seen, Ter. Ph. 5, 8, 64; Cael. ap. Cic. Fam. 8, 14, 1; cf.:

    pietas, pater, oculis dolorem prohibet,

    i. e. forbids me to take offence, Plaut. As. 5, 1, 4: in oculis, in the eye, i. e. in view, hoped or expected:

    frumenti spes, quae in oculis fuerat, utrosque frustrata pariter,

    Liv. 26, 39, 23:

    acies et arma in oculis erant,

    Curt. 3, 6, 3:

    Philotae supplicium in oculis erat,

    id. 8, 6, 21:

    esse in oculis,

    to be beloved, esteemed, Cic. Att. 6, 2, 5:

    esse in oculis multitudinis,

    id. Tusc. 2, 26, 63: ferre, gestare in oculis, to love, esteem, value:

    oderat tum, cum, etc....jam fert in oculis,

    id. Phil. 6, 4, 11:

    rex te ergo in oculis,

    Ter. Eun. 3, 1, 11: aequis oculis videre, i. e. contentedly, with satisfaction (like aequo animo), Curt. 8, 2, 9: ante oculos, in mind, in view:

    mors ante oculos debet esse,

    Sen. Ep. 12, 6; Plin. Ep. 3, 16, 6; also plain, obvious:

    simul est illud ante oculos,

    Cic. de Or. 2, 85, 349:

    sit ante oculos Nero,

    i. e. set him before you, consider him, Tac. H. 1, 16: ante oculos habere, to keep in mind (post-class.):

    habe ante oculos hanc esse terram,

    Plin. Ep. 8, 24, 4:

    mortalitatem,

    id. ib. 2, 10, 4; Just. 5, 6, 1; for which (late Lat.) prae oculis: prae oculis habere terrorem futuri judicii, Greg. M. Ep. 2, 48;

    3, 27 al.: nec jam fas ullum prae oculis habent,

    Amm. 30, 4, 18: ob oculos versari, to be before the mind, etc.:

    mors (ei) ob oculos versatur,

    Cic. Rab. Post. 14, 39; Liv. 28, 19, 14; cf.:

    usu versatur ante oculos vobis Glaucia,

    Cic. Rosc. Am. 35, 98; id. Fin. 2, 22, 75; 5, 1, 3; id. Dom. 55, 141; Liv. 34, 36, 6: ponere aliquid ante oculos, to call up in mind, imagine, etc.:

    eā (translatione) utimur rei ante oculos ponendae causā,

    Auct. Her. 4, 34, 45:

    ora eorum ponite vobis ante oculos,

    Cic. Phil. 13, 2, 4:

    calamitatem Cottae sibi ante oculos ponunt,

    Caes. B. G. 6, 37:

    exsilium Cn. Marci sibi proponunt ante oculos,

    Liv. 2, 54, 6:

    conjurationem ante oculos ponere,

    id. 24, 24, 8:

    studia eorum vobis ante oculos proponere,

    Auct. Her. 4, 36, 48;

    rarely: constituere sibi aliquid ante oculos,

    Cic. Cael. 32, 79; Aug. Serm. 233, 3: ante oculos ponere (proponere), with ellips. of dat. of person, Cic. Marc. 2, 5; id. Deiot. 7, 20; id. Phil. 2, 45, 115; 11, 3, 7; id. N. D. 1, 41, 114:

    nec a re publicā deiciebam oculos,

    id. Phil. 1, 1, 1.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > oculus

  • 45 orbiculatus

    orbĭcŭlātus, a, um, adj. [id.], circleshaped, rounded, circular, orbiculate (class.): mala, round apples, an excellent kind of apple, Varr. R. R. 1, 59; Col. 5, 10, 19; 12, 45, 5; Pall. Febr. 25, 18; Macr. S. 3, 19, 2.— Hence, transf.: malis orbiculatis pasti, i. e. well-fed, Cael. ap. Cic. Fam. 8, 15, 1:

    capita caulium,

    Plin. 27, 13, 109, § 133:

    ambitus foliorum,

    id. 24, 15, 87, § 137.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > orbiculatus

  • 46 orthomastius

    orthŏmastĭus, a, um (= orthomastios, from orthos, mastos), high-breasted:

    mammarum effigie orthomastia mala,

    a kind of large apple, Plin. 15, 14, 15, § 51.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > orthomastius

  • 47 Petisius

    Petisĭus, a, am, adj., Petisian:

    mala,

    a small sort of apple, paradise-apples, Plin. 15, 14, 15, § 50.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Petisius

  • 48 peto

    pĕto, īvi and ĭi, ītum, 3 ( perf. petīt, Verg. A. 9, 9;

    Ov F. 1, 109: petisti,

    Cic. Cat. 1, 5, 11; Verg. A. 4, 100; 12, 359:

    petistis,

    Auct. Her. 4, 15, 22:

    petissem,

    Cic. Verr. 1, 55, 145; Ov. M. 5, 26; Liv. 30, 25, 2:

    petisse,

    Cic. Quint. 11, 37; id. Verr. 2, 4, 63, § 140; Ov. [p. 1365] M. 9, 623; cf. Neue, Formenl. 2, 516 sq.), v. a. [Sanscr. root pat-, to fall upon, fly, find; Gr. pet- in piptô (pi-petô), to fall; cf. Lat. impetus and in petomai, to fly; cf. Lat. penna, acci-pit-er, etc.; the root of piptô, and therefore orig. to fall, fall upon; hence, to endeavor to reach or attain any thing].
    I.
    To fall upon any thing.
    A.
    Lit.
    1.
    In a hostile sense, to rush at, attack, assault, assail; to let fly at, aim a blow at, thrust at, etc. (class.; cf.:

    invado, aggredior): gladiatores et vitando caute, et petendo vehementer,

    Cic. Or. 68, 228:

    cujus latus mucro ille petebat,

    id. Lig. 3, 9:

    non latus aut ventrem, sed caput et collum petere,

    to thrust at, id. Mur. 26, 52:

    aliquem spiculo infeste,

    Liv. 2, 20:

    aliquem mālo,

    to throw an apple at any one, Verg. E. 3, 64:

    alicui ungue genas,

    Ov. A. A. 2, 452:

    aliquem saxis, id. de Nuce, 2: aprum jaculis,

    Suet. Tib. 72:

    aëra disco,

    Hor. S. 2, 2, 13:

    bello Penatìs,

    Verg. A. 3, 603:

    armis patriam,

    Vell. 2, 68, 3.—
    2.
    Without the notion of hostility: petere collum alicujus amplexu, to fall upon one's neck, to embrace one, M. Cael. ap. Quint. 4, 2, 124.—Esp. freq., to seek, to direct one's course to, to go or repair to, to make for, travel to a place:

    grues loca calidiora petentes,

    Cic. N. D. 2, 49, 125:

    Cyzicum,

    id. Fam. 14, 4, 3:

    Dyrrhachium,

    id. Planc. 41, 97:

    naves,

    to seek, take refuge in their ships, Nep. Milt. 5, 5:

    caelum pennis,

    to fly, Ov. F. 3, 457:

    Graiis Phasi petite viris,

    visited by the Greeks, id. P. 4, 10, 52:

    Metellus Postumium ad bellum gerendum Africam petentem,... urbem egredi passus non est,

    attempting to go, starting, Val. Max. 1, 1, 2.— Transf., of things, to proceed or go towards:

    campum petit amnis,

    Verg. G. 3, 522:

    mons petit astra,

    towers toward the stars, Ov. M. 1, 316: aliquem, to seek, go to a person:

    reginam,

    Verg. A. 1, 717:

    ut te supplex peterem, et tua limina adirem,

    id. ib. 6, 115: aliquid in locum or ad aliquem, to go to a place or person for something, to go in quest of, go to fetch:

    visum est tanti in extremam Italiam petere Brundisium ostreas,

    to go to Brundisium for oysters, Plin. 9, 54, 79, § 169:

    myrrham ad Troglodytas,

    id. 12, 15, 33, § 66:

    harena ad Aethiopas usque petitur,

    id. 36, 6, 9, § 51:

    collis, in quem vimina petebantur,

    id. 16, 10, 15, § 37:

    quaeque trans maria petimus,

    fetch, id. 19, 4, 19, §§ 58, 52.—
    II.
    Trop.
    A.
    To attack, assail one with any thing (class.):

    aiiquem epistulā,

    Cic. Att. 2, 2, 2:

    aliquem fraude et insidiis,

    Liv. 40, 55:

    aliquem falsis criminibus,

    Tac. A. 4, 31.—
    B.
    To demand, seek, require (cf. posco).
    1.
    In gen.:

    ita petit asparagus,

    Varr. R. R. 1, 23:

    ex iis tantum, quantum res petet, hauriemus,

    Cic. de Or. 3, 31, 123:

    aliquem in vincula,

    Quint. 7, 1, 55:

    aliquem ad supplicium,

    id. 7, 6, 6: poenas ab aliquo, to seek satisfaction from or revenge one's self on any one. ut poenas ab optimo quoque peteret sui doloris, Cic. Att. 1, 16, 7:

    ut merito ab eā poenas liberi sui petere debuerint,

    Quint. 3, 11, 12.—
    2.
    In partic.
    a.
    To demand or claim at law, to bring an action to recover, to sue for any thing (syn.:

    postulo): causam dicere Prius unde petitur... Quam ille qui petit,

    Ter. Eun. prol. 11:

    qui per se litem contestatur, sibi soli petit,

    Cic. Rosc Com. 18, 53: aliquando cum servis Habiti furti egit;

    nuper ab ipso Habito petere coepit,

    id. Clu. 59, 163:

    qui non calumniā litium alienos fundos, sed castris, exercitu, signis inferendis petebat,

    id. Mil. 27, 74.—
    b.
    To beg, beseech, ask, request, desire, entreat (syn.: rogo, flagito, obsecro); constr with ab and abl. of pers. (cf. infra); ante- and postclass., with acc. of pers.:

    vos volo, vos peto atque obsecro,

    Plaut. Curc. 1, 2, 60; freq. with ut:

    a te etiam atque etiam peto atque contendo, ut, etc.,

    Cic. Fam. 13, 1, 5:

    peto quaesoque, ut, etc.,

    id. ib. 5, 4, 2:

    peto igitur a te, vel, si pateris, oro, ut,

    id. ib. 9, 13, 3:

    petere in beneficii loco et gratiae, ut,

    id. Verr 2, 3, 82, § 189:

    petere precibus per litteras ab aliquo, ut,

    id. Sull. 19, 55:

    pacem ab aliquo,

    Caes. B. G. 2, 13:

    opem ab aliquo,

    Cic. Tusc. 5, 2, 5:

    vitam nocenti,

    Tac. A. 2, 31:

    petito, ut intrare urbem liceret,

    Just. 43, 5, 6.—Also, with id or illud, and ut, etc.: illud autem te peto, ut, etc., Dolab. ap. Cic. Fam. 9, 9, 2.—With obj.-clause (mostly poet.):

    arma umeris arcumque animosa petebat Ferre,

    Stat. Achill. 1, 352; cf.: cum peteret (solum) donari quasi proprio suo deo, Suet. Aug. 5: petit aes sibi dari eis artous, Gell. 9, 2, 1.—De aliquo (for ab aliquo), to beg or request of one (post-class.):

    si de me petisses, ut, etc.,

    Dig. 13, 6, 5.—Ab aliquo aliquid alicui, to beg a thing of one person for another (class.):

    M. Curtio tribunatum a Caesare petivi,

    Cic. Q. Fr. 2, 15, 3: ab aliquo pro aliquo petere, to intercede for:

    in eorum studiis, qui a te pro Ligario petunt,

    Cic. Lig. 10, 31.—With ex and abl. pers. (v. infra d.):

    eum petit litteris, ut ad Britanniam proficisceretur,

    Capitol. Pertin. 3, 5; Eutr. 2, 24.—Hence, pĕtītum, i, n., a prayer, desire, request, entreaty, Cat. 68, 39.—
    (β).
    Polit. t. t., to apply or solicit for an office, to be a candidate for office (different from ambire, to go about among the people to collect their votes, to canvass, which took place after the petitio):

    nemo est ex iis, qui nunc petunt, qui, etc.,

    Cic. Att. 1, 1, 2:

    consulatum,

    id. Phil. 2, 30, 76:

    praeturam,

    id. Verr. 1, 8, 23; Liv. 1, 35.—
    c.
    To solicit a person, to seek to possess, to woo:

    libidine sic accensa (Sempronia) ut viros saepius peteret quam peteretur,

    Sall. C. 25, 3:

    cum te tam multi peterent, tu me una petisti,

    Prop. 3, 13, 27:

    formosam quisque petit,

    id. 3, 32, 4:

    multi illam petiere,

    Ov. M. 1, 478; cf.: quae tuus Vir petet, cave, ne neges;

    Ne petitum aliunde eat,

    Cat. 61, 151.—
    d.
    To endeavor to obtain or pursue, to seek, strive after any thing, Plaut. Ep. 1, 2, 40:

    fugā salutem petere,

    Nep. Hann. 11, 4:

    praedam pedibus,

    Ov. M. 1, 534:

    gloriam,

    Sall. C. 54, 5:

    eloquentiae principatum,

    Cic. Or. 17, 56:

    sanguinis profusio vel fortuita vel petita,

    intentional, designed, produced by artificial means, Cels. 2, 8.—With inf.:

    bene vivere,

    Hor. Ep. 1, 11, 29:

    victricemque petunt dextrae conjungere dextram,

    Ov. M. 8, 421; 14, 571:

    conubiis natam sociare Latinis,

    Verg. A. 7, 96:

    aliquem transfigere ferro,

    Mart. 5, 51, 3.—With ex and abl., over, in the case of:

    ex hostibus victoriam petere,

    Liv. 8, 33, 13:

    supplicium ex se, non victoriam peti,

    id. 28, 19, 11:

    imperium ex victis hostibus populum Romanum petere,

    id. 30, 16, 7.—
    e.
    To fetch any thing:

    qui argentum petit,

    Plaut. Ep. 1, 1, 53:

    cibum e flammā,

    Ter. Eun, 3, 2, 38:

    altius initium rei demonstrandae,

    Cic. Caecin. 4, 10:

    aliquid a Graecis,

    id. Ac. 1, 2, 8:

    a litteris exiguam doloris oblivionem,

    to obtain, id. Fam. 5, 15, 4:

    suspirium alte,

    to fetch a deep sigh, Plaut. Cist. 1, 1, 57; cf.:

    latere petitus imo spiritus,

    Hor. Epod. 11, 10; and:

    gemitus alto de corde petiti,

    Ov. M. 2, 622:

    haec ex veteri memoriā petita,

    Tac. H. 3, 5, 1.—
    f.
    To take, betake one's self to any thing:

    iter a Vibone Brundisium terrā petere contendi,

    Cic. Planc. 40, 96:

    diversas vias,

    Val. Fl. 1, 91:

    alium cursum,

    to take another route, Cic. Att. 3, 8, 2:

    aliam in partem petebant fugam,

    betook themselves to flight, fled, Caes. B. G. 2, 24.—
    g.
    To refer to, relate to ( poet.):

    Trojanos haec monstra petunt,

    Verg. A. 9, 128.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > peto

  • 49 pomulum

    pōmŭlum, i, n. [pomum], a little apple, Jul. ap. Aug. c. Sec. Resp. Jul. 6, 20.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > pomulum

  • 50 Quiriniana

    Quĭrīnĭāna and Quĭrĭāna māla, a kind of apple, Cato, R. R. 7; Varr. R. R. 1, 59; Plin. 15, 14, 15, § 50; Macr. S. 2, 15, 2.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Quiriniana

  • 51 sorbum

    sorbum, i, n. [sorbus], the fruit of the sorbus, a sorb - apple, sorb, service - berry, Plin. 15, 21, 23, § 85; Cato, R. R. 7, 5; Varr. R. R. 1, 59, 3; Col. 12, 16, 4; Verg. G. 3, 380.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > sorbum

  • 52 tuber

    1.
    tūber, ĕris, n. [from root tum, tumeo], a hump, bump, swelling, tumor, protuberance on animal bodies, whether natural or caused by disease.
    I.
    Lit.:

    cameli,

    Plin. 8, 18, 26, § 67:

    boum,

    id. 8, 45, 70, § 179:

    tubera... anserino adipe curantur,

    tumors, id. 30, 12, 33, § 107; so id. 22, 24, 50, § 107; 26, 14, 87, § 139 al.; cf.: colaphis tuber est totum caput, is one boil, i. e. is full of boils, Ter. Ad. 2, 2, 37.—Prov.:

    ubi uber, ibi tuber,

    there are no roses without thorns, App. Flor. p. 359, 29: qui ne tuberibus propriis offendat amicum Postulat, ignoscet verrucis illius, boils... warts, for great and slight faults, Hor. S. 1, 3, 73. —
    II.
    Transf., of plants.
    A.
    A knob, hard excrescence on wood:

    tuber utrumque arboris ejus,

    Plin. 16, 16, 27, § 68; 16, 43. 84, § 231; 25, 8, 54, § 95.—
    B.
    A kind of mushroom, a truffle, moril, a favorite article of food among the Romans, Plin. 19, 2, 11, § 33:

    tenerrima verno esse,

    id. 19, 3, 13, § 37 sq.; Juv. 5, 116; 5, 119; 14, 7; Mart. 13, 50, 2.—
    C.
    Tuber terrae.
    1.
    Mole-hill, as a term of abuse, Petr. 58.—
    2.
    Another name for the cyclaminon, Plin. 25, 9, 67, § 115.
    2.
    tŭber, ĕris, m. and f.
    I.
    Fem., a kind of apple-tree, Plin. 16, 25, 42, § 103; Col. 11, 2, 11; Pall. Jan. 15, 20; id. Sept. 14, 1.—
    II.
    Masc., the fruit of this tree, Plin. 15, 14, 14, § 47; Mart. 13, 42, 1; 13, 43, 2; Suet. Dom. 16.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > tuber

  • 53 volubilis

    I.
    Lit.:

    buxum,

    i. e. a top, Verg. A. 7, 382:

    caelum,

    Cic. Univ. 6 fin.:

    sol,

    Prud. Cath. 3 praef.:

    nexus (anguis),

    Ov. M. 3, 41:

    volubilis et rotundus deus,

    Cic. N. D. 2, 17, 46:

    figurae aquae,

    Lucr. 3, 190:

    procursus,

    id. 2, 455:

    aquae,

    Hor. C. 4, 1, 40; cf.:

    labitur (sc. amnis), et labetur in omne volubilis aevum,

    id. Ep. 1, 2, 43:

    aurum,

    i. e. the golden apple, Ov. M. 10, 667; cf. id. H. 20, 209:

    electrum,

    Plin. 37, 3, 11, § 42:

    pila,

    App. M. 2, p. 116.—
    II.
    Trop.
    A.
    Of speech, rapid, fluent, voluble (the figure taken from rolling waters):

    vis volubilis orationis,

    Auct. Her. 3, 14, 25:

    oratio,

    Cic. Brut. 28, 108:

    rotunda volubilisque sententia,

    Gell. 11, 13, 4.— Transf., of the speaker:

    homo volubilis quādam praecipiti celeritate dicendi,

    Cic. Fl. 20, 48; id. Brut. 27, 105; id. Fragm. ap. Prisc. p. 617 P.—
    B.
    Of fate, changeable, mutable:

    vaga volubilisque fortuna,

    Cic. Mil. 26, 69; cf.:

    cum videamus tot varietates tam volubili orbe circumagi,

    Plin. Ep. 4, 24, 6:

    fortunae volubiles casus,

    Amm. 22, 1, 1:

    volubilium casuum diritas,

    id. 26, 1, 3.— Adv.: vŏlūbĭ-lĭter.
    1.
    Swiftly rolling, spinning, Amm. 20, 11, 26; cf. Non. p. 4, 1.—
    2.
    Trop., of speech, rapidly, fluently, volubly:

    funditur numerose et volubiliter oratio,

    Cic. Or. 62, 210.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > volubilis

  • 54 volubiliter

    I.
    Lit.:

    buxum,

    i. e. a top, Verg. A. 7, 382:

    caelum,

    Cic. Univ. 6 fin.:

    sol,

    Prud. Cath. 3 praef.:

    nexus (anguis),

    Ov. M. 3, 41:

    volubilis et rotundus deus,

    Cic. N. D. 2, 17, 46:

    figurae aquae,

    Lucr. 3, 190:

    procursus,

    id. 2, 455:

    aquae,

    Hor. C. 4, 1, 40; cf.:

    labitur (sc. amnis), et labetur in omne volubilis aevum,

    id. Ep. 1, 2, 43:

    aurum,

    i. e. the golden apple, Ov. M. 10, 667; cf. id. H. 20, 209:

    electrum,

    Plin. 37, 3, 11, § 42:

    pila,

    App. M. 2, p. 116.—
    II.
    Trop.
    A.
    Of speech, rapid, fluent, voluble (the figure taken from rolling waters):

    vis volubilis orationis,

    Auct. Her. 3, 14, 25:

    oratio,

    Cic. Brut. 28, 108:

    rotunda volubilisque sententia,

    Gell. 11, 13, 4.— Transf., of the speaker:

    homo volubilis quādam praecipiti celeritate dicendi,

    Cic. Fl. 20, 48; id. Brut. 27, 105; id. Fragm. ap. Prisc. p. 617 P.—
    B.
    Of fate, changeable, mutable:

    vaga volubilisque fortuna,

    Cic. Mil. 26, 69; cf.:

    cum videamus tot varietates tam volubili orbe circumagi,

    Plin. Ep. 4, 24, 6:

    fortunae volubiles casus,

    Amm. 22, 1, 1:

    volubilium casuum diritas,

    id. 26, 1, 3.— Adv.: vŏlūbĭ-lĭter.
    1.
    Swiftly rolling, spinning, Amm. 20, 11, 26; cf. Non. p. 4, 1.—
    2.
    Trop., of speech, rapidly, fluently, volubly:

    funditur numerose et volubiliter oratio,

    Cic. Or. 62, 210.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > volubiliter

  • 55 Anthonomus pomorum

    ENG apple blossom weevil
    NLD appelbloesemkever
    GER Apfelblutenstecher
    FRA anthonome du pommier

    Animal Names Latin to English > Anthonomus pomorum

  • 56 Biorhiza pallida

    ENG oak-apple gallfly
    NLD sponsgalwesp
    GER Eichen-Schwammgallwespe
    FRA biorhiza du chene

    Animal Names Latin to English > Biorhiza pallida

  • 57 Eriosoma lanigerum

    ENG woolly apple aphid
    NLD appelbloedluis
    GER Blutlaus
    FRA puceron laineux

    Animal Names Latin to English > Eriosoma lanigerum

  • 58 Hoplocampa testudinea

    ENG European apple sawfly
    NLD appelzaagwesp
    GER Apfelsagewespe
    FRA hoplocampe du pommier

    Animal Names Latin to English > Hoplocampa testudinea

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