Translation: from latin

a colony of the Milesians

  • 1 Milesia

    1.
    Mīlētus, i, m., = Milêtos, the father of Caunus and Byblis, Ov. M. 9, 443.— Hence, Mīlētis, ĭdis, f., the daughter of Miletus:

    moesta,

    Ov. M. 9, 634.
    2.
    Mīlētus ( - tos), i, f., = Milêtos, the city of Miletus, in Caria, the birthplace of Thales, Mel. 1, 17, 1; Plin. 5, 29, 31, § 112; Cic. Att. 9, 9, 2.—Esp., as a proverb for luxury and wantonness:

    paupertas Romana perit, hinc fluxit ad istos et Sybaris colles, hinc et Rhodos et Miletos,

    Juv. 6, 296. —Hence,
    A.
    Mīlēsĭus, a, um, adj., = Milêsios, of or belonging to the city of Miletus, Milesian:

    Milesia mulier,

    Cic. Clu. 11, 32:

    vellera,

    Verg. G. 3, 306:

    lana,

    Plin. 29, 2, 9, § 33:

    rosa,

    id. 21, 4, 10, § 16: deus, i. e. Apollo, who had a temple and oracle at Miletus, App. M. 4, p. 157, 19:

    Ceres,

    Val. Max. 1, 1, 5: carmina, v. in the foll.—
    B.
    Subst.
    1.
    Mīlēsĭa, ae, f., Miletus:

    propter Milesiae conditorem,

    App. M. 4, p. 157, 29.—
    2.
    Mīlēsii, ōrum, m., the inhabitants of Miletus, Milesians, famous for their luxury and wantonness, Liv. 38, 39. 9;

    hence, transf.: Milesia carmina,

    wanton, lascivious songs, Ov. Tr. 2, 413:

    sermo Milesius,

    obscent stories, App. M. 1 init.; for which, as subst., Mīlēsĭae, ārum, f. plur. (sc. fabulae), Sev. Aug. ap. Capitol. Albin. 12.—
    b.
    Mī-lētis, ĭdis, f. adj., of or belonging to Miletus, Milesian:

    Miletida ad urbem, i. e. Tomi,

    a colony of Milesians, Ov. Tr. 1, 10, 41.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Milesia

  • 2 Milesiae

    1.
    Mīlētus, i, m., = Milêtos, the father of Caunus and Byblis, Ov. M. 9, 443.— Hence, Mīlētis, ĭdis, f., the daughter of Miletus:

    moesta,

    Ov. M. 9, 634.
    2.
    Mīlētus ( - tos), i, f., = Milêtos, the city of Miletus, in Caria, the birthplace of Thales, Mel. 1, 17, 1; Plin. 5, 29, 31, § 112; Cic. Att. 9, 9, 2.—Esp., as a proverb for luxury and wantonness:

    paupertas Romana perit, hinc fluxit ad istos et Sybaris colles, hinc et Rhodos et Miletos,

    Juv. 6, 296. —Hence,
    A.
    Mīlēsĭus, a, um, adj., = Milêsios, of or belonging to the city of Miletus, Milesian:

    Milesia mulier,

    Cic. Clu. 11, 32:

    vellera,

    Verg. G. 3, 306:

    lana,

    Plin. 29, 2, 9, § 33:

    rosa,

    id. 21, 4, 10, § 16: deus, i. e. Apollo, who had a temple and oracle at Miletus, App. M. 4, p. 157, 19:

    Ceres,

    Val. Max. 1, 1, 5: carmina, v. in the foll.—
    B.
    Subst.
    1.
    Mīlēsĭa, ae, f., Miletus:

    propter Milesiae conditorem,

    App. M. 4, p. 157, 29.—
    2.
    Mīlēsii, ōrum, m., the inhabitants of Miletus, Milesians, famous for their luxury and wantonness, Liv. 38, 39. 9;

    hence, transf.: Milesia carmina,

    wanton, lascivious songs, Ov. Tr. 2, 413:

    sermo Milesius,

    obscent stories, App. M. 1 init.; for which, as subst., Mīlēsĭae, ārum, f. plur. (sc. fabulae), Sev. Aug. ap. Capitol. Albin. 12.—
    b.
    Mī-lētis, ĭdis, f. adj., of or belonging to Miletus, Milesian:

    Miletida ad urbem, i. e. Tomi,

    a colony of Milesians, Ov. Tr. 1, 10, 41.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Milesiae

  • 3 Milesii

    1.
    Mīlētus, i, m., = Milêtos, the father of Caunus and Byblis, Ov. M. 9, 443.— Hence, Mīlētis, ĭdis, f., the daughter of Miletus:

    moesta,

    Ov. M. 9, 634.
    2.
    Mīlētus ( - tos), i, f., = Milêtos, the city of Miletus, in Caria, the birthplace of Thales, Mel. 1, 17, 1; Plin. 5, 29, 31, § 112; Cic. Att. 9, 9, 2.—Esp., as a proverb for luxury and wantonness:

    paupertas Romana perit, hinc fluxit ad istos et Sybaris colles, hinc et Rhodos et Miletos,

    Juv. 6, 296. —Hence,
    A.
    Mīlēsĭus, a, um, adj., = Milêsios, of or belonging to the city of Miletus, Milesian:

    Milesia mulier,

    Cic. Clu. 11, 32:

    vellera,

    Verg. G. 3, 306:

    lana,

    Plin. 29, 2, 9, § 33:

    rosa,

    id. 21, 4, 10, § 16: deus, i. e. Apollo, who had a temple and oracle at Miletus, App. M. 4, p. 157, 19:

    Ceres,

    Val. Max. 1, 1, 5: carmina, v. in the foll.—
    B.
    Subst.
    1.
    Mīlēsĭa, ae, f., Miletus:

    propter Milesiae conditorem,

    App. M. 4, p. 157, 29.—
    2.
    Mīlēsii, ōrum, m., the inhabitants of Miletus, Milesians, famous for their luxury and wantonness, Liv. 38, 39. 9;

    hence, transf.: Milesia carmina,

    wanton, lascivious songs, Ov. Tr. 2, 413:

    sermo Milesius,

    obscent stories, App. M. 1 init.; for which, as subst., Mīlēsĭae, ārum, f. plur. (sc. fabulae), Sev. Aug. ap. Capitol. Albin. 12.—
    b.
    Mī-lētis, ĭdis, f. adj., of or belonging to Miletus, Milesian:

    Miletida ad urbem, i. e. Tomi,

    a colony of Milesians, Ov. Tr. 1, 10, 41.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Milesii

  • 4 Miletos

    1.
    Mīlētus, i, m., = Milêtos, the father of Caunus and Byblis, Ov. M. 9, 443.— Hence, Mīlētis, ĭdis, f., the daughter of Miletus:

    moesta,

    Ov. M. 9, 634.
    2.
    Mīlētus ( - tos), i, f., = Milêtos, the city of Miletus, in Caria, the birthplace of Thales, Mel. 1, 17, 1; Plin. 5, 29, 31, § 112; Cic. Att. 9, 9, 2.—Esp., as a proverb for luxury and wantonness:

    paupertas Romana perit, hinc fluxit ad istos et Sybaris colles, hinc et Rhodos et Miletos,

    Juv. 6, 296. —Hence,
    A.
    Mīlēsĭus, a, um, adj., = Milêsios, of or belonging to the city of Miletus, Milesian:

    Milesia mulier,

    Cic. Clu. 11, 32:

    vellera,

    Verg. G. 3, 306:

    lana,

    Plin. 29, 2, 9, § 33:

    rosa,

    id. 21, 4, 10, § 16: deus, i. e. Apollo, who had a temple and oracle at Miletus, App. M. 4, p. 157, 19:

    Ceres,

    Val. Max. 1, 1, 5: carmina, v. in the foll.—
    B.
    Subst.
    1.
    Mīlēsĭa, ae, f., Miletus:

    propter Milesiae conditorem,

    App. M. 4, p. 157, 29.—
    2.
    Mīlēsii, ōrum, m., the inhabitants of Miletus, Milesians, famous for their luxury and wantonness, Liv. 38, 39. 9;

    hence, transf.: Milesia carmina,

    wanton, lascivious songs, Ov. Tr. 2, 413:

    sermo Milesius,

    obscent stories, App. M. 1 init.; for which, as subst., Mīlēsĭae, ārum, f. plur. (sc. fabulae), Sev. Aug. ap. Capitol. Albin. 12.—
    b.
    Mī-lētis, ĭdis, f. adj., of or belonging to Miletus, Milesian:

    Miletida ad urbem, i. e. Tomi,

    a colony of Milesians, Ov. Tr. 1, 10, 41.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Miletos

  • 5 Miletus

    1.
    Mīlētus, i, m., = Milêtos, the father of Caunus and Byblis, Ov. M. 9, 443.— Hence, Mīlētis, ĭdis, f., the daughter of Miletus:

    moesta,

    Ov. M. 9, 634.
    2.
    Mīlētus ( - tos), i, f., = Milêtos, the city of Miletus, in Caria, the birthplace of Thales, Mel. 1, 17, 1; Plin. 5, 29, 31, § 112; Cic. Att. 9, 9, 2.—Esp., as a proverb for luxury and wantonness:

    paupertas Romana perit, hinc fluxit ad istos et Sybaris colles, hinc et Rhodos et Miletos,

    Juv. 6, 296. —Hence,
    A.
    Mīlēsĭus, a, um, adj., = Milêsios, of or belonging to the city of Miletus, Milesian:

    Milesia mulier,

    Cic. Clu. 11, 32:

    vellera,

    Verg. G. 3, 306:

    lana,

    Plin. 29, 2, 9, § 33:

    rosa,

    id. 21, 4, 10, § 16: deus, i. e. Apollo, who had a temple and oracle at Miletus, App. M. 4, p. 157, 19:

    Ceres,

    Val. Max. 1, 1, 5: carmina, v. in the foll.—
    B.
    Subst.
    1.
    Mīlēsĭa, ae, f., Miletus:

    propter Milesiae conditorem,

    App. M. 4, p. 157, 29.—
    2.
    Mīlēsii, ōrum, m., the inhabitants of Miletus, Milesians, famous for their luxury and wantonness, Liv. 38, 39. 9;

    hence, transf.: Milesia carmina,

    wanton, lascivious songs, Ov. Tr. 2, 413:

    sermo Milesius,

    obscent stories, App. M. 1 init.; for which, as subst., Mīlēsĭae, ārum, f. plur. (sc. fabulae), Sev. Aug. ap. Capitol. Albin. 12.—
    b.
    Mī-lētis, ĭdis, f. adj., of or belonging to Miletus, Milesian:

    Miletida ad urbem, i. e. Tomi,

    a colony of Milesians, Ov. Tr. 1, 10, 41.

    Lewis & Short latin dictionary > Miletus

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