Translation: from spanish

(tener+orgasmo)

  • 501 tener presente

    v.
    1 to bear in mind, to keep in mind, to remember, to have at the back of one's mind.
    2 to bear in mind to, to remember to, to keep in mind to.
    * * *
    to bear in mind
    * * *
    (v.) = be mindful of/that, bear in + mind, consider (as), keep in + focus, keep in + mind, make + consideration, mind, make + provision for, have + regard for, be aware of
    Ex. She examines the features that make it attractive while also being mindful of its minor flaws.
    Ex. Editors should bear in mind problems of translation so that the revised edition can be rendered more easily into other languages.
    Ex. A book index is an alphabetically arranged list of words or terms leading the reader to the numbers of pages on which specific topics are considered, or on which specific names appear.
    Ex. We will not disserve readers by instructing them through our subject headings in nonbiased terminology; we will, in fact, be keeping all of our readers in focus.
    Ex. This fact should be kept in mind when deciding upon the sequence of materials types.
    Ex. There is, however, a further consideration that must be made, particularly if given the opportunity of planning a new building.
    Ex. They see people as marked by one particular attribute, cleverness, or kindness, or strictness, or being a good shot, and they mind whether things are right or wrong.
    Ex. We must of course make provision for those users who look for information under one of the other terms, and this is discussed below in the section on showing semantic relationships.
    Ex. The apparent success of the project suggests it can be used or adapted for other members of the beef industry, having regard for their particular circumstances = El aparente éxito del proyecto sugiere que se puede utilizar o adaptar para otros miembros de la industria del ganado bovino, teniendo en cuenta sus circunstancias particulares.
    Ex. Although this may seem an obvious statement, there are many instances when the searcher is not fully aware of what can or might be retrieved.
    * * *
    (v.) = be mindful of/that, bear in + mind, consider (as), keep in + focus, keep in + mind, make + consideration, mind, make + provision for, have + regard for, be aware of

    Ex: She examines the features that make it attractive while also being mindful of its minor flaws.

    Ex: Editors should bear in mind problems of translation so that the revised edition can be rendered more easily into other languages.
    Ex: A book index is an alphabetically arranged list of words or terms leading the reader to the numbers of pages on which specific topics are considered, or on which specific names appear.
    Ex: We will not disserve readers by instructing them through our subject headings in nonbiased terminology; we will, in fact, be keeping all of our readers in focus.
    Ex: This fact should be kept in mind when deciding upon the sequence of materials types.
    Ex: There is, however, a further consideration that must be made, particularly if given the opportunity of planning a new building.
    Ex: They see people as marked by one particular attribute, cleverness, or kindness, or strictness, or being a good shot, and they mind whether things are right or wrong.
    Ex: We must of course make provision for those users who look for information under one of the other terms, and this is discussed below in the section on showing semantic relationships.
    Ex: The apparent success of the project suggests it can be used or adapted for other members of the beef industry, having regard for their particular circumstances = El aparente éxito del proyecto sugiere que se puede utilizar o adaptar para otros miembros de la industria del ganado bovino, teniendo en cuenta sus circunstancias particulares.
    Ex: Although this may seem an obvious statement, there are many instances when the searcher is not fully aware of what can or might be retrieved.

    Spanish-English dictionary > tener presente

  • 502 tener prisa

    v.
    to be in a hurry, to be pressed for time, to be in a rush.
    * * *
    to be in a hurry
    * * *
    * * *
    Ex. Librarians too easily forget that many readers are in a hurry, and hardly any are under no time constraint at all.
    * * *

    Ex: Librarians too easily forget that many readers are in a hurry, and hardly any are under no time constraint at all.

    Spanish-English dictionary > tener prisa

  • 503 tener problemas con

    to have trouble with
    * * *
    (v.) = fall + foul of, run + afoul of problems, run + afoul of, fall + afoul of
    Ex. The author attempts to unravel the mystery of how Microsoft came to fall foul of the Department of Justice.
    Ex. While being a crusader against government spending, Congresswoman Marsha Blackburn has run afoul of problems in her personal finances.
    Ex. Unfortunately for them, this approach runs afoul of Iraqi tribal customs since they are, reportedly, endogamous with respect to tribe.
    Ex. As some of her prophecies came true, she fell afoul of the authorities and was arrested by the Holy Order.
    * * *
    (v.) = fall + foul of, run + afoul of problems, run + afoul of, fall + afoul of

    Ex: The author attempts to unravel the mystery of how Microsoft came to fall foul of the Department of Justice.

    Ex: While being a crusader against government spending, Congresswoman Marsha Blackburn has run afoul of problems in her personal finances.
    Ex: Unfortunately for them, this approach runs afoul of Iraqi tribal customs since they are, reportedly, endogamous with respect to tribe.
    Ex: As some of her prophecies came true, she fell afoul of the authorities and was arrested by the Holy Order.

    Spanish-English dictionary > tener problemas con

  • 504 tener que

    v.
    to have to, to be to, to have got to, to must.
    * * *
    1 (obligación) to have to, have got to, must
    * * *
    2) must
    * * *
    = have to, hafta [have to]
    Ex. Dexter Rundle went on: 'As I said I'm late for an appointment and have to go, but tell Ms. Lachaise that I'll be in touch with her'.
    Ex. This paper examines colloquial contractions (spelling variants such as 'kinda' and ' hafta') against a background of other variations in the English writing system.
    * * *
    = have to, hafta [have to]

    Ex: Dexter Rundle went on: 'As I said I'm late for an appointment and have to go, but tell Ms. Lachaise that I'll be in touch with her'.

    Ex: This paper examines colloquial contractions (spelling variants such as 'kinda' and ' hafta') against a background of other variations in the English writing system.

    Spanish-English dictionary > tener que

  • 505 tener razón

    v.
    to be right, to be in the right.
    * * *
    to be right
    * * *
    * * *
    (v.) = be correct, be right, be spot on, be in the right
    Ex. You are correct in your answer.
    Ex. Publishers are right to be concerned about uncontrolled republication.
    Ex. The program is spot on -- you can't fault it with the presentation and it's totally inoffensive and suitable for kids.
    Ex. She thinks she's always in the right and there is nothing wrong with how she's acting.
    * * *
    (v.) = be correct, be right, be spot on, be in the right

    Ex: You are correct in your answer.

    Ex: Publishers are right to be concerned about uncontrolled republication.
    Ex: The program is spot on -- you can't fault it with the presentation and it's totally inoffensive and suitable for kids.
    Ex: She thinks she's always in the right and there is nothing wrong with how she's acting.

    Spanish-English dictionary > tener razón

  • 506 tener sed

    v.
    to be thirsty, to thirst, to feel thirsty.
    * * *
    to be thirsty
    * * *
    * * *
    (v.) = be thirsty
    Ex. They soon complained about the heat and being thirsty and hungry, even though they had only been out in the field about an hour.
    * * *
    (v.) = be thirsty

    Ex: They soon complained about the heat and being thirsty and hungry, even though they had only been out in the field about an hour.

    Spanish-English dictionary > tener sed

  • 507 tener sentido

    v.
    1 to make sense, to add up, to be understandable, to stack up.
    Este chico tiene sentido This boy makes sense.
    Tiene sentido It makes sense.
    2 to make sense.
    Este chico tiene sentido This boy makes sense.
    * * *
    to make sense
    * * *
    (v.) = make + sense, be meaningful
    Ex. It makes sense in this case to establish two prediction patterns: one for the airmail subscription and one for the others.
    Ex. The choice of metal chairs with plastic seats, rather than wooden chairs with leather coverings, is meaningful.
    * * *
    (v.) = make + sense, be meaningful

    Ex: It makes sense in this case to establish two prediction patterns: one for the airmail subscription and one for the others.

    Ex: The choice of metal chairs with plastic seats, rather than wooden chairs with leather coverings, is meaningful.

    Spanish-English dictionary > tener sentido

  • 508 tener su origen en

    to originate in
    * * *
    (v.) = trace to, trace back to, have + Posesivo + roots in, originate (from)
    Ex. Many people have traced the function of the catalog as included in the Paris Principles to Cutter's objectives.
    Ex. The problem of inadequate citation of conference papers can usually be traced back to authors of papers or books who cite conference papers they have heard or read by somewhat laconic statements of the name of the author/presenter of the paper.
    Ex. Swedish public libraries have their roots in the idea of voluntary education.
    Ex. Funding for advice centres can originate from any one of four government departments: the Department of Trade, the Home Office, the Lord Chancellor's Office and the Department of the Environment.
    * * *
    (v.) = trace to, trace back to, have + Posesivo + roots in, originate (from)

    Ex: Many people have traced the function of the catalog as included in the Paris Principles to Cutter's objectives.

    Ex: The problem of inadequate citation of conference papers can usually be traced back to authors of papers or books who cite conference papers they have heard or read by somewhat laconic statements of the name of the author/presenter of the paper.
    Ex: Swedish public libraries have their roots in the idea of voluntary education.
    Ex: Funding for advice centres can originate from any one of four government departments: the Department of Trade, the Home Office, the Lord Chancellor's Office and the Department of the Environment.

    Spanish-English dictionary > tener su origen en

  • 509 tener suerte

    v.
    to be lucky, to have good luck, to have luck, to get lucky.
    * * *
    to be lucky
    * * *
    (v.) = be lucky, count + Posesivo + blessings, get + lucky, strike + gold, hit + the jackpot, strike + lucky, be in for a good thing, come in for + a good thing, be into a good thing, be in luck
    Ex. 'We were lucky you happened to be sitting in your dean's office when I called about the position, and that you could come over for an interview right away'.
    Ex. The article ' Count your blessings' evaluates the features and performance of 7 log-file analyzers designed to analyze the traffic using World Wide Web (WWW) Web sites.
    Ex. The article is entitled 'Sports get lucky with lotteries lolly'.
    Ex. That was a Gold Rush term: the money a miner needed for grub until he struck gold.
    Ex. Many gamblers dream about the day that they will hit the jackpot.
    Ex. It's a bit like a lottery -- sometimes you strike lucky and become rich and famous.
    Ex. The value of shares were steadily rising and we began to hope that we might be in for a good thing at last.
    Ex. They are the kind who complain of their hard luck when some one else happens to come in for a good thing.
    Ex. They are plainly and simply greedy people who are into a good thing.
    Ex. We were in luck in that the cheese was both in season and in stock andwe bought a huge wheel for 11 euros.
    * * *
    (v.) = be lucky, count + Posesivo + blessings, get + lucky, strike + gold, hit + the jackpot, strike + lucky, be in for a good thing, come in for + a good thing, be into a good thing, be in luck

    Ex: 'We were lucky you happened to be sitting in your dean's office when I called about the position, and that you could come over for an interview right away'.

    Ex: The article ' Count your blessings' evaluates the features and performance of 7 log-file analyzers designed to analyze the traffic using World Wide Web (WWW) Web sites.
    Ex: The article is entitled 'Sports get lucky with lotteries lolly'.
    Ex: That was a Gold Rush term: the money a miner needed for grub until he struck gold.
    Ex: Many gamblers dream about the day that they will hit the jackpot.
    Ex: It's a bit like a lottery -- sometimes you strike lucky and become rich and famous.
    Ex: The value of shares were steadily rising and we began to hope that we might be in for a good thing at last.
    Ex: They are the kind who complain of their hard luck when some one else happens to come in for a good thing.
    Ex: They are plainly and simply greedy people who are into a good thing.
    Ex: We were in luck in that the cheese was both in season and in stock and
    we bought a huge wheel for 11 euros
    .

    Spanish-English dictionary > tener suerte

  • 510 tener sueño

    v.
    to be sleepy, to feel sleepy.
    * * *
    to feel sleepy, be sleepy
    * * *
    (v.) = be sleepy, feel + sleepy
    Ex. The day was definitely ending and she was sleepy from work, hunger, lack of sleep and probably dehydration.
    Ex. If during the day, you feel sleepy then it can help tremendously if you wash your face with cold water.
    * * *
    (v.) = be sleepy, feel + sleepy

    Ex: The day was definitely ending and she was sleepy from work, hunger, lack of sleep and probably dehydration.

    Ex: If during the day, you feel sleepy then it can help tremendously if you wash your face with cold water.

    Spanish-English dictionary > tener sueño

  • 511 tener un corazón de oro

    to have a heart of gold
    * * *
    * * *
    (v.) = have + a heart of gold
    Ex. Though my old man's a dustman he's got a heart of gold.
    * * *
    (v.) = have + a heart of gold

    Ex: Though my old man's a dustman he's got a heart of gold.

    Spanish-English dictionary > tener un corazón de oro

  • 512 tener una cita

    to have an appointment, have an engagement
    * * *
    = date
    Ex. Blood hypothesized that girls were dated because they exhibit such personality characteristics as consideration, cheerfulness, being a good sport, & a sense of humor = Blood formuló la hipótesis de que las chicas tenían citas debido a las características de su personalidad como consideración, alegría, ser una tía apañada y tener sentido del humor.
    * * *

    Ex: Blood hypothesized that girls were dated because they exhibit such personality characteristics as consideration, cheerfulness, being a good sport, & a sense of humor = Blood formuló la hipótesis de que las chicas tenían citas debido a las características de su personalidad como consideración, alegría, ser una tía apañada y tener sentido del humor.

    Spanish-English dictionary > tener una cita

  • 513 tener éxito

    v.
    to have success, to be successful, to succeed, to be a hit.
    Ricardo acertó en su empresa Richard succeeded in his undertaking.
    * * *
    to be successful
    * * *
    * * *
    (v.) = achieve + success, be successful, get + anywhere, meet + success, prove + successful, succeed, attain + appeal, be a success, find + success, come up + trumps, prove + trumps, take off, meet with + success, hit + the big time, be popular, go + strong
    Ex. Some success was achieved in 1851 by boiling straw in caustic soda and mixing it with rag stock, but the resulting paper was still of poor quality and was little used by printers.
    Ex. For a scheme to be successful in the long term it is vital that there should be an organisational structure to support the scheme.
    Ex. The storyteller has in fact to be something of a showman, a performer, before he gets anywhere.
    Ex. Although the fifteenth edition met with some success, it was not generally popular.
    Ex. In Germany, Hitler's propaganda machine was proving alarmingly successful.
    Ex. Had this venture succeeded, the complete face of bibliographical control today would have been different.
    Ex. The good novelist is therefore an author with a wide appeal but this wide appeal is not attained, or even sought, through a dilution of quality; it is simply that this type of writer has a different sort of skill.
    Ex. The idea of having several indexes has not proved to be a success and has been dropped.
    Ex. During the 1980s, due to technology like cable and pay per view, wrestling increased its visibility and found some mainstream success.
    Ex. The article 'Clumps come up trumps' reviews four clump projects now at the end of their funding period = El artículo "Los catálogos colectivos virtuales triunfan' analiza cuatro proyectos sobre catálogos colectivos virtuales que se encuentran al final de su período de financiación.
    Ex. This new software will prove trumps for Microsoft = Este nuevo software será un éxito para Microsoft.
    Ex. But at some stage they are going to take off and public librarians will need to be ready to stake their claim to be the most appropriate people to collect and organize local community information.
    Ex. Consumers appear to complain largely when they believe their efforts were likely to meet with success.
    Ex. The word 'humongous' first darted onto the linguistic stage only about 1968 but hit the big time almost immediately and has been with us ever since.
    Ex. The arrangement of two rotors side by side was never very popular.
    Ex. At that time OCLC was already going strong, and we tried to find some backing from the State of New York and possibly from the federal government to marry those two systems.
    * * *
    (v.) = achieve + success, be successful, get + anywhere, meet + success, prove + successful, succeed, attain + appeal, be a success, find + success, come up + trumps, prove + trumps, take off, meet with + success, hit + the big time, be popular, go + strong

    Ex: Some success was achieved in 1851 by boiling straw in caustic soda and mixing it with rag stock, but the resulting paper was still of poor quality and was little used by printers.

    Ex: For a scheme to be successful in the long term it is vital that there should be an organisational structure to support the scheme.
    Ex: The storyteller has in fact to be something of a showman, a performer, before he gets anywhere.
    Ex: Although the fifteenth edition met with some success, it was not generally popular.
    Ex: In Germany, Hitler's propaganda machine was proving alarmingly successful.
    Ex: Had this venture succeeded, the complete face of bibliographical control today would have been different.
    Ex: The good novelist is therefore an author with a wide appeal but this wide appeal is not attained, or even sought, through a dilution of quality; it is simply that this type of writer has a different sort of skill.
    Ex: The idea of having several indexes has not proved to be a success and has been dropped.
    Ex: During the 1980s, due to technology like cable and pay per view, wrestling increased its visibility and found some mainstream success.
    Ex: The article 'Clumps come up trumps' reviews four clump projects now at the end of their funding period = El artículo "Los catálogos colectivos virtuales triunfan' analiza cuatro proyectos sobre catálogos colectivos virtuales que se encuentran al final de su período de financiación.
    Ex: This new software will prove trumps for Microsoft = Este nuevo software será un éxito para Microsoft.
    Ex: But at some stage they are going to take off and public librarians will need to be ready to stake their claim to be the most appropriate people to collect and organize local community information.
    Ex: Consumers appear to complain largely when they believe their efforts were likely to meet with success.
    Ex: The word 'humongous' first darted onto the linguistic stage only about 1968 but hit the big time almost immediately and has been with us ever since.
    Ex: The arrangement of two rotors side by side was never very popular.
    Ex: At that time OCLC was already going strong, and we tried to find some backing from the State of New York and possibly from the federal government to marry those two systems.

    Spanish-English dictionary > tener éxito

  • 514 no tener ni para pipas

    familiar to be broke, be skint
    * * *
    to be broke, be skint*

    Spanish-English dictionary > no tener ni para pipas

  • 515 no tener precio

    figurado to be priceless
    * * *

    Spanish-English dictionary > no tener precio

  • 516 no tener sangre en las venas

    figurado to be a cold fish, be unemotional
    * * *

    Spanish-English dictionary > no tener sangre en las venas

  • 517 tener algo en la punta de la lengua

    figurado to have something on the tip of one's tongue
    ————————
    to have something on the tip of one's tongue
    * * *

    Spanish-English dictionary > tener algo en la punta de la lengua

  • 518 tener buen diente

    familiar to have a good appetite
    * * *

    Spanish-English dictionary > tener buen diente

  • 519 tener el alma en un hilo

    to have one's heart in one's mouth, be worried sick
    * * *

    Spanish-English dictionary > tener el alma en un hilo

  • 520 tener la cabeza llena de pájaros

    Spanish-English dictionary > tener la cabeza llena de pájaros

Look at other dictionaries:

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  • Orgasmo expandido — Un orgasmo expandido es cualquier experiencia sexual más intensa y extensa de lo que se describe habitualmente como un orgasmo regular.[1] Incluye un rango de sensaciones que incluyen orgasmos de cuerpo entero, tales como los descritos por el… …   Wikipedia Español

  • acabar — 1. tener orgasmo; eyacular; cf. irse cortado, botar la piedra, desocuparse; nunca acabamos juntos, mi marido y yo , ya pues mi amor, acabe pronto que tenemos que llegar a tiempo a ese funeral , gordita ¿Si? Ya acabé ya 2. terminar; eliminar;… …   Diccionario de chileno actual

  • irse cortado — 1. eyacular; tener orgasmo; cf. echar cortado, mandar cortado, acabar, irse cortina; mi marido tiene problemas de eyaculación precoz... ¿Ella qué? Se va cortado muy rápido, huevona Ah , oye ¿ya te fuiste cortado ya? 2. no poder seguir; fracasar;… …   Diccionario de chileno actual

  • irse cortina — eyacular; tener orgasmo; cf. echar cortado, mandar cortado, acabar, irse cortado; papito, no se preocupe por mí; acuérdese que yo soy puta; váyase cortina solito no más …   Diccionario de chileno actual

  • Respuesta sexual humana — La respuesta sexual humana es el conjunto de cambios físicos y hormonales que poseen los seres humanos frente a las estimulaciones en sus zonas erógenas, estas respuestas tienen como objetivo facilitar la reproducción sexual humana. Fue estudiada …   Wikipedia Español

  • Multiorgasmo — es la obtención de múltiples orgasmos. Lo pueden llevar a cabo las mujeres, y en menor medida los hombres[1] que no tienden a presentar directamente periodo refractario, por lo que pueden experimentar un subsiguiente orgasmo, y quizás otros más.… …   Wikipedia Español

  • correr — (Del lat. currere.) ► verbo intransitivo 1 Andar muy deprisa y con impulso, de manera que entre cada paso los dos pies quedan en el aire: ■ corrieron tras el ladrón pero no lo alcanzaron. 2 Ir de un lugar a otro rápidamente. ANTÓNIMO [pararse] 3… …   Enciclopedia Universal

  • Eyaculación — Saltar a navegación, búsqueda La eyaculación es la expulsión o emisión de semen a través del pene, acompañada de sensaciones placenteras. Las primeras eyaculaciones se suelen producir mientras se tiene un sueño erótico. A esas primeras emisiones… …   Wikipedia Español

  • Pene — El pene (del latín penis, cola, pene ) o falo (del griego antiguo φαλλός, transliterado phallós) es el órgano copulador masculino, que interviene, además, en la excreción urinaria. Pene sin circuncidar en estado de flacidez …   Wikipedia Español


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